31

Is there any way to raise two errors at the same time by using try and except? For example, ValueError and KeyError.

How do I do that?

3
  • 3
    Why would you want to do that?
    – Kos
    Oct 10, 2012 at 18:51
  • 5
    Do you mean 'raise' or 'catch'?
    – user647772
    Oct 10, 2012 at 18:56
  • 1
    You can catch two exceptions at once as below, either handling them both the same or handling them each differently. That way you will be prepared no matter which exception is raised. But you cannot raise two errors at once, unless you make a subclass of two errors in which case that error will be caught by an except for either parent class. Oct 10, 2012 at 18:57

6 Answers 6

133

The question asks how to RAISE multiple errors not catch multiple errors.

Strictly speaking you can't raise multiple exceptions but you could raise an object that contains multiple exceptions.

raise Exception(
    [
        Exception("bad"),
        Exception("really bad"),
        Exception("really really bad"),
    ]
)

Question: Why would you ever want to do this?
Answer: In a loop when you want to raise an error but process the loop to completion.

For example when unit-testing with unittest2 you might want to raise an exception and keep processing then raise all of the errors at the end. This way you can see all of the errors at once.

def test_me(self):
    
    errors = []
    
    for modulation in self.modulations:
        logging.info('Testing modulation = {modulation}'.format(**locals()))

        self.digitalModulation().set('value', modulation)
        reply = self.getReply()
   
        try: 
            self._test_nodeValue(reply, self.digitalModulation())
        except Exception as e:
            errors.append(e)
            
    if errors:
        raise Exception(errors)

Python 3.11

Starting with 3.11 you can use ExceptionGroup to raise multiple exceptions.

raise ExceptionGroup("this was bad",
    [
        Exception("bad"),
        Exception("really bad"),
        Exception("really really bad"),
    ]
)
4
  • 9
    You seem to be the only person who read the question correctly. Feb 14, 2020 at 17:28
  • 1
    @prooffreader the question was originally asking something different before someone else edited it. As you can see, the downvoted question is the accepted one, so it was actually answering the question. Take a look at the history of the question.
    – soerface
    Jun 12, 2020 at 20:43
  • 2
    @soerface the history of the question doesn't support your claim... There is only one edit indeed of someone else which is only minor formatting and didn't change the meaning of the question. Unless there was an edit in the first 2 minutes of the question (that is not logged in the history)...
    – Tomerikoo
    Sep 16, 2020 at 17:15
  • Python 3.11 introduces exception groups. So the last line in the example would be: raise ExceptionGroup("test_me exceptions: ", errors)
    – majkelx
    Nov 1, 2022 at 17:58
6

You could raise an error which inherits from both ValueError and KeyError. It would get caught by a catch block for either.

class MyError(ValueError, KeyError):
    ...
4

Yes, you can handle more than one error, either using

try:
    # your code here
except (ValueError, KeyError) as e:
    # catch it, the exception is accessable via the variable e

Or, directly add two "ways" of handling different errors:

try:
    # your code here
except ValueError as e:
    # catch it, the exception is accessable via the variable e
except KeyError as e:
    # catch it, the exception is accessable via the variable e

You may also leave out the "e" variable.

Checkout the documentation: http://docs.python.org/tutorial/errors.html#handling-exceptions

1
  • 1
    For clarification: The question asked originally how to catch two errors, not how to raise them. That's why this answer exists and that's also why the downvoted question is the accepted one.
    – soerface
    Jun 12, 2020 at 20:34
0

The solution from @shrewmouse still requires to choose an exception class to wrap the caught exceptions.

  • Following solution uses Exception Chaining via finally to execute code after one exception occurs
  • We don't need to know beforehand, what exceptions occur
  • Note that only the first exception that occurs can be detected from the caller via except
    • if this is a problem, use @Collin's solution above to inherit from all collected exceptions
  • You'll see the exceptions separated by:
    "During handling of the above exception, another exception occurred:"
def raise_multiple(errors):
    if not errors:  # list emptied, recursion ends
        return
    try:
        raise errors.pop()  # pop removes list entries
    finally:
        raise_multiple(errors)  # recursion

If you have a task that needs to be done for each element of a list, you don't need to collect the Exceptions beforehand. Here's an example for multiple file deletion with multiple error reporting:

def delete_multiple(files):
    if not files:
        return
    try:
        os.remove(files.pop())
    finally:
        delete_multiple(files)

PS:
Tested with Python 3.8.5
To print full traceback per exception have a look at traceback.print_exc
The original question is answered since years. But as this page is the top search result for "python raise multiple" I share my approach to fill an (IMHO relevant) gap in the solution spectrum.

2
  • My solution does not require the try loop to know anything about the caught exception. The process raising the exception, is the one that deals with creating an object holding multiple exceptions.
    – shrewmouse
    Jan 11, 2021 at 16:29
  • Choosing "Exception" as the wrapping exception class is an unnecessary definition. In effect, your approach always throws this class, for example: Exception: [TypeError(...), TypeError(...)]. Nice and short, but the printed trace doesn't indicate paths of the errors that occurred, but instead, the line where "Exception(errors)" was defined. My solution does not define a wrapping class, so one can catch the (first/last) actually occurred exception from outside. This can be used to automatically take appropriate measures towards solving the problem. So I think it is a useful addition.
    – restart4tw
    Apr 7, 2021 at 13:19
-1
try :
    pass
except (ValueError,KeyError):
    pass

read more about Handling exceptions

2
  • 9
    For clarification: The question asked originally how to catch two errors, not how to raise them. That's why this answer is the accepted one.
    – soerface
    Jun 12, 2020 at 20:35
  • That's not what the page history says.
    – shrewmouse
    Nov 23, 2021 at 23:12
-1

You can Raise more than one exception like this:

try:
    i = 0
    j = 1 / i
except ZeroDivisionError:
    try:
        i = 'j'
        j = 4 + i
    except TypeError:
        raise ValueError

NOTE: it may be that only the ValueError is raised but this error message seems right:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<pyshell#9>", line 3, in <module>
    j = 1 / i
ZeroDivisionError: division by zero

During handling of the above exception, another exception occurred:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<pyshell#9>", line 7, in <module>
    j = 4 + i
TypeError: unsupported operand type(s) for +: 'int' and 'str'

During handling of the above exception, another exception occurred:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<pyshell#9>", line 9, in <module>
    raise ValueError
ValueError

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