653

I'm trying to create get and set method for a property:

private _name: string;

Name() {
    get:
    {
        return this._name;
    }
    set:
    {
        this._name = ???;
    }
}

What's the keyword to set a value?

  • 12
    The underscore and PascalCase conflicts with the Typescript coding guidlines: github.com/Microsoft/TypeScript/wiki/Coding-guidelines – Niels Steenbeek Jan 12 '17 at 8:48
  • 2
    Hi @NielsSteenbeek - following the TypeScript contributors guidelines with properties and backing fields you'd end up with a name conflict. What's the suggested approach? – Jordan May 18 '17 at 9:20
  • Perhaps: typescript private name: string; getName() { get: { return this.name; } set: { this.name = ???; } } – Jordan May 18 '17 at 9:22
  • 7
    Good thing those Typescript coding guidelines are pretty unattractive. I would only use them under coercion (e.g. I was paid to do so). – Thomas Eding Jun 30 '17 at 16:25
  • 14
    @NielsSteenbeek: did you read that document? "This is NOT a prescriptive guideline for the TypeScript community" – Jonathan Cast Apr 12 '18 at 1:22
1074

TypeScript uses getter/setter syntax that is like ActionScript3.

class foo {
    private _bar: boolean = false;
    get bar(): boolean {
        return this._bar;
    }
    set bar(value: boolean) {
        this._bar = value;
    }
}

That will produce this JavaScript, using the ECMAScript 5 Object.defineProperty() feature.

var foo = (function () {
    function foo() {
        this._bar = false;
    }
    Object.defineProperty(foo.prototype, "bar", {
        get: function () {
            return this._bar;
        },
        set: function (value) {
            this._bar = value;
        },
        enumerable: true,
        configurable: true
    });
    return foo;
})();

So to use it,

var myFoo = new foo();
if(myFoo.bar) {         // calls the getter
    myFoo.bar = false;  // calls the setter and passes false
}

However, in order to use it at all, you must make sure the TypeScript compiler targets ECMAScript5. If you are running the command line compiler, use --target flag like this;

tsc --target ES5

If you are using Visual Studio, you must edit your project file to add the flag to the configuration for the TypeScriptCompile build tool. You can see that here:

As @DanFromGermany suggests below, if your are simply reading and writing a local property like foo.bar = true, then having a setter and getter pair is overkill. You can always add them later if you need to do something, like logging, whenever the property is read or written.

| improve this answer | |
  • 59
    Nice answer. Also, note that, unlike in C#, properties are not currently virtualized in TypeScript (v0.9.5). When you implement "get bar()" in a derived class, you are replacing "get bar()" in the parent. Implications include not being able to call the base class accessor from the derived accessor. This is only true for properties - methods behave as you might expect. See answer by SteveFenton here: stackoverflow.com/questions/13121431/… – David Cuccia Jan 17 '14 at 19:29
  • 14
    I'm slightly confused about the underscore. Typescript convention says not to use underscores for private variables? But in this case, we have to use underscores - or we'll get a conflict between the private and public "bar" – Kokodoko Apr 7 '16 at 10:43
  • 4
    Use the the underscore is a personal preference for private properties. However, I believe you are right in that we want the property to have a different name than the getter/setter methods. – Ezward Apr 7 '16 at 16:24
  • 3
    Why do you use myFoo.bar = true instead of myFoo.bar(true); or myFoo.setBar(true); ?? – Daniel W. Feb 21 '17 at 10:30
  • 6
    @DanFromGermany A property is "syntactic sugar" for a pair of "get" and "set" methods. Microsoft originated the concept of a property with Visual Basic and carried it over to .NET languages such as C# and VB.NET. For example, see Properties (C# Programming Guide). Properties simplify accessing the state of an object and (in my opinion) eliminate the "noisiness" of having to deal with "get/set" method pairs. (Or sometimes only "get" methods where immutability is desired.) – DavidRR May 14 '17 at 14:53
109

Ezward has already provided a good answer, but I noticed that one of the comments asks how it is used. For people like me who stumble across this question, I thought it would be useful to have a link to the official documentation on getters and setters on the Typescript website as that explains it well, will hopefully always stay up-to-date as changes are made, and shows example usage:

http://www.typescriptlang.org/docs/handbook/classes.html

In particular, for those not familiar with it, note that you don't incorporate the word 'get' into a call to a getter (and similarly for setters):

var myBar = myFoo.getBar(); // wrong    
var myBar = myFoo.get('bar');  // wrong

You should simply do this:

var myBar = myFoo.bar;  // correct (get)
myFoo.bar = true;  // correct (set) (false is correct too obviously!)

given a class like:

class foo {
  private _bar:boolean = false;

  get bar():boolean {
    return this._bar;
  }
  set bar(theBar:boolean) {
    this._bar = theBar;
  }
}

then the 'bar' getter for the private '_bar' property will be called.

| improve this answer | |
  • If I was wanting to replace a public class-level var with a property, is it a straight drop-in replacement that I can put in place and not worry about it? In other words, if I regression test one accessor and one setter, can I deem it a success? Or are there cases where it won't work exactly the same as a var and i need to test all 100 places that use this var/prop? – Adam Plocher Nov 19 '18 at 11:51
  • I was wondering if there was a workaround for for using underscores to distinguish the property name from the getter or setter methods. In one course I was doing they said underscores were not preferred but didn't give an alternative. – cham May 19 '19 at 2:53
  • 1
    @cham You don't have to use underscores here... You can call the private variable notbar if you want. – Robert McKee Nov 4 '19 at 22:47
57

Here's a working example that should point you in the right direction:

class Foo {
    _name;

    get Name() {
        return this._name;
    }

    set Name(val) {
        this._name = val;
    }
}

Getters and setters in JavaScript are just normal functions. The setter is a function that takes a parameter whose value is the value being set.

| improve this answer | |
  • 30
    To be clear, there's no need for the property, getter and setter to be static. – Drew Noakes Oct 17 '13 at 12:01
  • 1
    the variable references are still static though. Foo._name should be replaced with this._name – Johannes Oct 10 '17 at 21:22
6

You can write this

class Human {
    private firstName : string;
    private lastName : string;

    constructor (
        public FirstName?:string, 
        public LastName?:string) {

    }

    get FirstName() : string {
        console.log("Get FirstName : ", this.firstName);
        return this.firstName;
    }
    set FirstName(value : string) {
        console.log("Set FirstName : ", value);
        this.firstName = value;
    } 

    get LastName() : string {
        console.log("Get LastName : ", this.lastName);
        return this.lastName;
    }
    set LastName(value : string) {
        console.log("Set LastName : ", value);
        this.lastName = value;
    } 

}
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    Why the public in constructor? – MuriloKunze Oct 11 '12 at 18:33
  • 16
    Yes, can't have public in constructor in this code. public here defines duplicate members. – orad Jul 27 '13 at 15:51
  • 2
    You can write it but it wont compile – Justin Jun 3 '16 at 21:43
1

It is very similar to creating common methods, simply put the keyword reserved get or set at the beginning.

class Name{
    private _name: string;

    getMethod(): string{
        return this._name;
    }

    setMethod(value: string){
        this._name = value
    }

    get getMethod1(): string{
        return this._name;
    }

    set setMethod1(value: string){
        this._name = value
    }
}

class HelloWorld {

    public static main(){

        let test = new Name();

        test.setMethod('test.getMethod() --- need ()');
            console.log(test.getMethod());

        test.setMethod1 = 'test.getMethod1 --- no need (), and used = for set ';
            console.log(test.getMethod1);
    }
}
HelloWorld.main();

In this case you can skip return type in get getMethod1() {

    get getMethod1() {
        return this._name;
    }
| improve this answer | |
1

I think I probably get why is it so confusing. In your example, we wanted getters and setters for _name. But we achieve that by creating getters and setters for an unrelated class variable Name.

Consider this:

class Car{
    private tiresCount = 4;
    get yourCarTiresCount(){
        return this.tiresCount ;
    }
    set yourCarTiresCount(count) {
        alert('You shouldn't change car tire count')
    }
}

Above code does following:

  1. get and set create getter and setter for yourCarTiresCount (not for tiresCount).

The getter is :

function() {
    return this.tiresCount ;
}

and the setter is :

function(count) {
    alert('You shouldn't change car tire count');
}

Meaning, every time we do new Car().yourCarTiresCount, getter runs. And for every new Car().yourCarTiresCount('7') setter runs.

  1. Indirectly create getter, but not the setter, for private tireCount.
| improve this answer | |
1

TS offers getters and setters which allow object properties to have more control of how they are accessed (getter) or updated (setter) outside of the object. Instead of directly accessing or updating the property a proxy function is called.

Example:

class Person {
    constructor(name: string) {
        this._name = name;
    }

    private _name: string;

    get name() {
        return this._name;
    }

    // first checks the length of the name and then updates the name.
    set name(name: string) {
        if (name.length > 10) {
            throw new Error("Name has a max length of 10");
        }

        this._name = name;  
    }

    doStuff () {
        this._name = 'foofooooooofoooo';
    }


}

const person = new Person('Willem');

// doesn't throw error, setter function not called within the object method when this._name is changed
person.doStuff();  

// throws error because setter is called and name is longer than 10 characters
person.name = 'barbarbarbarbarbar';  
| improve this answer | |
-6

If you are working with TypeScript modules and are trying to add a getter that is exported, you can do something like this:

// dataStore.ts
export const myData: string = undefined;  // just for typing support
let _myData: string;  // for memoizing the getter results

Object.defineProperty(this, "myData", {
    get: (): string => {
        if (_myData === undefined) {
            _myData = "my data";  // pretend this took a long time
        }

        return _myData;
    },
});

Then, in another file you have:

import * as dataStore from "./dataStore"
console.log(dataStore.myData); // "my data"
| improve this answer | |
  • 8
    That's terrible advice. In particular, this must be undefined at the top level scope of a module. You could use exports instead but you should not do it at all as it is practically guaranteed to cause compatibility problems – Aluan Haddad Jan 12 '18 at 10:13

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