11
d = {
    "local": {
        "count": 1,
        "health-beauty": {
            "count": 1,
            "tanning": {"count": 1}
        }
    },
    "nationwide": {"count": 9.0},
    "travel": {"count": 0}
}    

In this instance "nationwide" is the largest.

Code is below to make it easier to attach to scripts:

d = {'travel': {'count': 0}, 'local': {'count': 1, 'health-beauty': {'count': 1, 'tanning': {'count': 1}}}, 'nationwide': {'count': 9.0}}
11
>>> max(d, key=lambda x: d[x]['count'])
'nationwide'
  • 1
    Legend! Was almost there thanks for this – AlexZ Oct 10 '12 at 23:17
  • 2
    this wont work .. say if your internal dict is biggest(since it doesnt even consider the nested dictionaries) – Joran Beasley Oct 10 '12 at 23:20
  • 1
    Joran: count gets incremented for each child... – AlexZ Oct 10 '12 at 23:22
  • change d['local']['tanning']["count"] to 10 I will bet you that it doesnt return tanning ... – Joran Beasley Oct 10 '12 at 23:29
  • 1
    ahhh ... I just misunderstood the question I think then... – Joran Beasley Oct 10 '12 at 23:44
1

This should work for nested dictionary:

def find_max(d, name=None):
    return max((v, name) if k == "count" else find_max(v, k) for k, v in d.items())

>>> find_max(d)
(9.0, 'nationwide')
  • 1
    that wont work I dont think... local has a key count and more entries that each have their own count... – Joran Beasley Oct 10 '12 at 23:19
  • @JoranBeasley fixed – defuz Oct 10 '12 at 23:23
  • nice work :) ... – Joran Beasley Oct 10 '12 at 23:32

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