156

I knew boolean in mysql as tinyint (1).

Today I see a table with defined an integer like tinyint(2), and also others like int(4), int(6) ...

What does the size means in field of type integer and tinyint ?

  • 4
    Read about MySQL Integer data types here. – bodi0 Oct 11 '12 at 12:51
  • 1
    @AamirR's answer is the correct one – evilReiko Feb 15 '18 at 7:59
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    @evilReiko zerofill also doesn’t make a difference in how the value is stored, it’s really about presentation ... spaces or zeroes don’t really make a difference in the correctness of anyone’s answer imo – Ja͢ck Feb 27 '18 at 16:17
59

It means display width

Whether you use tinyint(1) or tinyint(2), it does not make any difference.

I always use tinyint(1) and int(11), I used several mysql clients (navicat, sequel pro).

It does not mean anything AT ALL! I ran a test, all above clients or even the command-line client seems to ignore this.

But, display width is most important if you are using ZEROFILL option, for example your table has following 2 columns:

A tinyint(2) zerofill

B tinyint(4) zerofill

both columns has the value of 1, output for column A would be 01 and 0001 for B, as seen in screenshot below :)

zerofill with displaywidth

  • 11
    Weirdly enought I just discovered that in the C# official MySQL connector tinyint(1) never returns values different from 0 and 1. This probably has to do with tinyint(1) automatically being recognized as a boolean. Just a heads up it sometimes matters. – Daniel Sharp Jun 11 '18 at 23:30
  • Isn't it better to use a integer type and length as small as possible? I was under the impression this saved memory in MySQL. – nclsvh Aug 14 '18 at 7:07
  • As @Daniel-Sharp points out it could seem to matter to connectors. Just had an issue with Hibernate using JDBC reporting it interpreted a TINYINT(1) as a BIT. – sfj Nov 21 '18 at 11:32
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    @DanielSharp that is probably due to the connection option tinyInt1isBit which defaults to true. See dev.mysql.com/doc/connector-j/8.0/en/… – Parisbre56 Jun 11 at 7:40
207

The (m) indicates the column display width; applications such as the MySQL client make use of this when showing the query results.

For example:

| v   | a   |  b  |   c |
+-----+-----+-----+-----+
| 1   | 1   |  1  |   1 |
| 10  | 10  | 10  |  10 |
| 100 | 100 | 100 | 100 |

Here a, b and c are using TINYINT(1), TINYINT(2) and TINYINT(3) respectively. As you can see, it pads the values on the left side using the display width.

It's important to note that it does not affect the accepted range of values for that particular type, i.e. TINYINT(1) still accepts [-128 .. 127].

  • 13
    what does it mean 'column width' ?? – realtebo Oct 12 '12 at 14:35
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    @realtebo it's mainly used by the mysql command line client for display purposes. – Ja͢ck Oct 12 '12 at 23:25
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    The number of "digits" shown by the interface. In other words, it will pad zeros at the left. This kind of feature made some sense in the early days of databases, but now it is just legacy. – Denilson Sá Maia Aug 28 '14 at 20:03
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    @Kailas If you're not using the mysql client? None at all. – Ja͢ck Sep 3 '14 at 8:58
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    @Kailas No! tinyint(1) doesn't accept only 0-9. It accepts the whole range of what tinyint can hold. – Ja͢ck Sep 3 '14 at 9:03
18
mysql> CREATE TABLE tin3(id int PRIMARY KEY,val TINYINT(10) ZEROFILL);
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.04 sec)

mysql> INSERT INTO tin3 VALUES(1,12),(2,7),(4,101);
Query OK, 3 rows affected (0.02 sec)
Records: 3  Duplicates: 0  Warnings: 0

mysql> SELECT * FROM tin3;
+----+------------+
| id | val        |
+----+------------+
|  1 | 0000000012 |
|  2 | 0000000007 |
|  4 | 0000000101 |
+----+------------+
3 rows in set (0.00 sec)

mysql>

mysql> SELECT LENGTH(val) FROM tin3 WHERE id=2;
+-------------+
| LENGTH(val) |
+-------------+
|          10 |
+-------------+
1 row in set (0.01 sec)


mysql> SELECT val+1 FROM tin3 WHERE id=2;
+-------+
| val+1 |
+-------+
|     8 |
+-------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)
  • 7
    Please edit your answer to include some explanation. Code-only answers do very little to educate future SO readers. Your answer is in the moderation queue for being low-quality. – mickmackusa Apr 22 '17 at 2:28
13

About the INT, TINYINT... These are different data types, INT is 4-byte number, TINYINT is 1-byte number. More information here - INTEGER, INT, SMALLINT, TINYINT, MEDIUMINT, BIGINT.

The syntax of TINYINT data type is TINYINT(M), where M indicates the maximum display width (used only if your MySQL client supports it).

Numeric Type Attributes.

  • 1
    what does it mean 'display width' !? – realtebo Oct 12 '12 at 14:35
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    From the reference - For example, INT(4) specifies an INT with a display width of four digits. This optional display width may be used by applications to display integer values having a width less than the width specified for the column by left-padding them with spaces. – Devart Oct 12 '12 at 14:38
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    But I have not seen applications or MySQL clients which use this feature. I always use INT(11) and use formatting functions to customize output. – Devart Oct 12 '12 at 14:44

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