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SELECT BINARY_CHECKSUM('Clifton House, Thornaby Place, Teesdale South, Stockton-On-Tees, Cleveland, TS17 6SD')
SELECT BINARY_CHECKSUM('Clifton House, Teesdale South, Thornaby Place, Stockton-On-Tees, Cleveland, TS17 6SD')

SELECT BINARY_CHECKSUM('Glenfield Hospital, Groby Road, , Leicester, Leicestershire, LE3 9DZ')
SELECT BINARY_CHECKSUM('Glenfield Hospital, Groby Road, , Leicester, Leicestershire, LE3 9EJ')

Have a look at the above. The 2 pairs of addresses will generate the same checksum value even though there are differences in the text. It is my understanding that, whilst you cannot guarantee that CHECKSUM and BINARY_CHECKSUM will be different for any random content that they should be good for determining relatively small changes in a given row.

Interestingly these pairs of values demonstrate precisely the opposite. They are generating equal checksum values for very similar data values. These are in fact the only duplicate checksum values in a largish (680,000 record) table of addresses.

I am a little concerned that I have misunderstood the value of checksum in generating UPDATEs? Do I have to resort to a brute force field by field comparison to be absolutely certain of picking up a change in a row of data?

The original data for these examples was in 6 separate columns. I have reduced the code sample to a minimal state for clarity.

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    You can use CHECKSUM to determine that two values are definitely different, but to determine if they are the same, you should always perform a full comparison if the CHECKSUMs match. Oct 11, 2012 at 14:38
  • I think you may not have understood my example - the checksum is NOT allowing the separation of 2 values that are definitely different. Oct 11, 2012 at 14:59
  • No, the point I was making is that, if you get two CHECKSUM results and they are different values, then you know that the inputs to those CHECKSUMs were definitely different. If you get two CHECKSUM results (or any form of hashing) that have the same value, then that's not the end of the inquiry - you know that either they are the same value, or that they have the same hash - but to know which, you should always perform a full comparison. Oct 11, 2012 at 16:02

3 Answers 3

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Checksums are never completely foolproof. For a totally-always-correct-no-matter-what-solution brute force is the way. There are some less intense methods that can work though.

A checksum is pretty much a really simple hash. Try using hashbytes instead. then you can make use of a more chaotic algorithm like md5.

eg:

SELECT HASHBYTES('MD5', 'Glenfield Hospital, Groby Road, , Leicester, Leicestershire, LE3 9DZ')
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    Based on some information from another post I have carried out the comparison on the strings when reversed. This does create different checksums for the 2 pairs. So - it would appear that CHECKSUM(value1) = CHECKSUM(value2) AND CHECKSUM(REVERSE(value1)) = CHECKSUM(REVERSE(value2)) would be a more reliable comparison although this still does not leave me with a warm comfortable feeling. Oct 11, 2012 at 15:02
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try using HASHBYTES() with MD5 or SHA1 instead of BINARY_CHECKSUM. read the help for HASHBYTES() first...

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You might be able to use hashbytes:

SELECT HASHBYTES('MD5', 'Glenfield Hospital, Groby Road, , Leicester, Leicestershire, LE3 9DZ')

SELECT HASHBYTES('MD5', 'Glenfield Hospital, Groby Road, , Leicester, Leicestershire, LE3 9EJ')

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