6

I'm trying to create a stored procedure that allows parameters to be omitted, but ANDed if they are provided:

CREATE PROCEDURE 
    MyProcedure

    @LastName Varchar(30) = NULL,
    @FirstName Varchar(30) = NULL,
    @SSN INT = NULL
AS

SELECT LastName, FirstName, RIGHT(SSN,4) as SSN
FROM Employees
WHERE 
    (
        (LastName like '%' + ISNULL(@LastName, '') + '%')
            AND 
        (FirstName like '%' + ISNULL(@FirstName, '') + '%')
    )
AND
    (SSN = @SSN)

I only want to do the AND if there's an @SSN provided. Or is there some other way to do this?

If an SSN is provided, all records are returned by the LastName/FirstName part of the query. If just a lastname/firstname is provided, the AND makes it so no records are returned since the SSN won't validate.

Ideas?


Additional Clarification

Assume a basic recordset:

First          Last          SSN  
Mike           Smith         123456789  
Tom            Jones         987654321

IF we ALTER the Procedure above so it doesn't include this chunk:

AND
    (SSN = @SSN)

then everything works great, provided we're passed a FirstName or LastName. But I want to be able to include SSN, if one is provided.

If I change the AND to an OR, then I get a bad result set since the FirstName/LastName portion of the query evalute to:

WHERE (LastName like '%%' and FirstName like '%%')

(which will, of course, return all records)


If I can't conditionally abort the AND, I'm hoping for something like:

AND
    (SSN like ISNULL(@SSN, '%'))

:-)

0

5 Answers 5

16

Change:

AND (SSN = @SSN) 

to:

AND (SSN = @SSN or @SSN is null)

If SSN is never null, you could also do:

AND SSN = ISNULL(@SSN, SSN)
14
  • Wouldn't that return null SSNs when a value has been provided?
    – StevieG
    Commented Oct 11, 2012 at 17:32
  • wouldn't it be better to check "is null" first for short circuiting? Commented Oct 11, 2012 at 17:32
  • Actually wouldn't you want to do something like "AND ((SSN is not null AND SSN = @SSN) OR (@SSN is null))" Commented Oct 11, 2012 at 17:34
  • @Benjamin re: short-circuit, depends on which parameter signature is most common. I doubt there is any signficant difference in performance either way. Commented Oct 11, 2012 at 17:38
  • @Benjamin wouldn't you want to do something like... - why? Commented Oct 11, 2012 at 17:42
0

You can also try:

(ISNULL(SSN, @SSN) = @SSN)
1
  • Thanks for helping, diana... but the AND is my issue - not how to provide a missing value for SSN. Please see my added edits to the question. Commented Oct 11, 2012 at 17:54
0

You could put both versions of the statement in an if block.

 AS
 IF @SSN IS NULL
      /*regular statement*/
 ELSE
      /*Statement with @SSN*/

or

 AND
      SSN = ISNULL(@SSN, SSN)

I have never used the 2nd option but I know it exists.

4
  • Thanks for helping, Bmo... but the AND is my issue - not how to provide a missing value for SSN. Please see my added edits to the question. Commented Oct 11, 2012 at 17:53
  • Then the first option checks to see if an SSN got passed. If it does it runs the SELECT without the AND, if an SSN did get passed it would run the SELECT with the AND.
    – Bmo
    Commented Oct 11, 2012 at 17:57
  • So two completely seperate selects is the only way to do this? That seems like one way to do it - but it's very wordy when I actually have a few other potential parameters that could be passed. Commented Oct 11, 2012 at 18:10
  • I'm sure it's not the only way to do it. It's just all that I can think of. I'm fairly new to it.
    – Bmo
    Commented Oct 11, 2012 at 18:18
0

HERE's THE BIBLE on dynamic search parameters in SQL Server. You should write it like this

SELECT LastName, FirstName, RIGHT(SSN,4) as SSN
FROM Employees
WHERE (NULLIF(@LastName,'') IS NULL OR LastName LIKE '%' + @LastName + '%')
  AND (NULLIF(@FirstName,'') IS NULL OR FirstName LIKE '%' + @FirstName + '%')
  AND (@SSN is null or SSN = @SSN)
   -- or if not provided means blank, then
   -- (@SSN = '' or SSN = @SSN)
OPTION (RECOMPILE)

BTW, there's no such thing as a short circuit boolean in SQL Server. Yes it does stop at the first conclusion, but there's no guarantee the condition on the left is processed before the right. e.g. this code is NOT SAFE. I'm using 'ABC.123' but that could just as well be a column.

WHERE ISNUMERIC('ABC.123') = 1 OR CAST('ABC.123' AS INT) > 10

To illustrate on the AND (@SSN is null or SSN = @SSN) clause, for when @SSN is not provided, i.e. NULL

   AND (@SSN is null or SSN = NULL)
=> AND (NULL IS NULL or SSN = NULL)
=> AND (TRUE or SSN = NULL)
=> AND (TRUE)

-- In other words, this filter is "dissolved" and appears as if it never existed.
-- (in the scheme of a series of AND conditions)
1
  • Richard, thanks for helping. The note about no guarantee which side is processed first is very interesting, I don't think I've ever counted on it, but it's good to know that I shouldn't. Commented Oct 11, 2012 at 17:55
0
CREATE PROCEDURE 
    MyProcedure

    @LastName Varchar(30) = NULL,
    @FirstName Varchar(30) = NULL,
    @SSN INT = -1
AS

SELECT LastName, FirstName, RIGHT(SSN,4) as SSN
FROM Employees
WHERE 
    (
        (LastName like '%' + ISNULL(@LastName, '') + '%')
            AND 
        (FirstName like '%' + ISNULL(@FirstName, '') + '%')
    )
AND
    (SSN = @SSN or @SSN = -1)

Just give @SSN a default value and you can use the AND all the time and worry about it.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.