8

I want to write a small app that sits in my tray and that allows me to select an executable and prevent it from opening.

The UI of the app is easy to do using WinForms.

What I want to know is how to detect if a certain exe has been lauched and then how to stop it from running. I'm pretty sure I'll have to dig down into some Win32 stuff but I have no experience in that area, hence this post.

There is an existing app similar to this, but I can't for the life of me remember what it's called. It was written in VB6 and it's open source too.

Any help is much appreciated.

Thanks.

  • 2
    Why do you want to stop the application from opening? And wouldn't it be better to just restrict the user permissions so the application cannot be opened? – John Saunders Aug 16 '09 at 16:41
  • yeah I looked into setting the group policies but I found out that apps can still be launced from the CMD so I need to disable that too which I do not want to do. – Spidey Aug 16 '09 at 18:01
  • 1
    No, you can set the ACL on the files themselves so that they cannot be executed. – John Saunders Aug 16 '09 at 18:54

10 Answers 10

12

Rather than trying to kill the process when it runs, how about stopping it from running in the first place?

Changing what happens when the shell tries to launch an application is simple - add a new registry key to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Image File Execution Options

To test this I added a registry key called notepad.exe and within this the string value Debugger with the value calc.exe. Now whenever I try and run notepad calc opens. The following is the exported registry key.

REGEDIT4

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Image File Execution Options\notepad.exe]
"Debugger"="calc.exe"

Having made this change I've not yet managed to open notepad, not bad for a no code solution. If you need to be 100% certain that the application never runs you could always add a "kill" solution too as detailed by others.

  • This is a great method Stephen. I can add this to the app so now instead of polling every 10 seconds it just changes the registry once. Sweet. – Spidey Aug 16 '09 at 19:00
5

Just a small addition to Stephen Nutt's otherwise excellent answer:

If you want the program to go away for good, don't just pop up something else in its stead (calc.exe in Stephen's example). Specify the key: "Debugger" = "ntsd -c q"

This will invoke NT's ever-present command-line debugger ntsd for the program with the command line argument -c saying "execute the debugger command specified next"; the debugger command is q (meaning quit). This will stop the debugger, which as a side effect will kill the debuggee -- the program you want to prevent from running -- too.

Clean, nice and easy. The only side effect I observed is that sometimes a transient command window pops up briefly with a debugger prompt only to disappear again in a moment.

  • Thanks for that, I was wondering what to put instead of the calc.exe. – Spidey Aug 16 '09 at 22:19
1

A Windows hook should solve your problem. I haven't ever tried this...but you will have to do some pinvoke to Win32 APIs to achieve this. Google Win32 hook and see.

1

OK, I just found the app I was originally looking for.

It's called Temptation Blocker and it's available here

It will find all the executables and allow you to select what to block for however many hours.

It's not perfect, I wish it would auto start so I don't have to manually start it but apart from that it's pretty good

0

I remember some Win32 functionality which helps solving such scenarios. If you are using .Net anyway that would probably a pain to implement. I would use some of the cross-process synchronization objects (don't know out of my head which ones are cross-process) and would set some signal. At startup just let your app check whether the signal is already set. If yes, just close the app again.

0

One of the ideas, but not the best is to watch the running processes and kill the needed running process when found, this can be done with normal managed C# code.

  • yeah this is the method I'm using so far. This will close the app after it's been opened so it gets me about 90% there. private bool KillProcess(string name) { foreach (Process clsProcess in Process.GetProcesses()) { if (clsProcess.ProcessName.ToLower().StartsWith(name.ToLower())) { clsProcess.Kill(); return true; } } return false; } I'm just wondering if it's worth spending the time researching the windows hook (which i know nothing about) for the convenience of instant app blocking. – Spidey Aug 16 '09 at 18:05
  • ok, that code didn't format properly. – Spidey Aug 16 '09 at 18:06
0

instead of waiting for the executable to open, so you can close it again, you can also just cripple the executable.

just change a few of the bytes in the exe header and prevent it that way from ever starting.

Just do it in a way that the effect is reversible.

0
    private bool KillProcess(string name)
    {
        foreach (Process clsProcess in Process.GetProcesses())
        {
            if (clsProcess.ProcessName.ToLower().StartsWith(name.ToLower()))
            {
                clsProcess.Kill();
                return true;
            }
        }
       return false;
    }

yeah this is the method I'm using so far. This will close the app after it's been opened so it gets me about 90% there. I use a timer that checks every 10 seconds. I'm just wondering if it's worth spending the time researching the windows hook (which i know nothing about) for the convenience of instant app blocking. Those of you who know the Win32 api, is it worth the effort?

0
internal static class Program
{
    private static Mutex m;

    [STAThread]
    private static void Main()
    {
        bool flag;
        m = new Mutex(true, "ProgramName", out flag);
        if (!flag)
        {
            MessageBox.Show("Another instance is already running.");
        }
        else
        {
            //start program
        }
    }
}

I'm using this in a program, and it works perfectly, and it should be able to change this for your needs.

  • My code effectively does the same thing. i.e. Find a process and deal with it. – Spidey Aug 16 '09 at 18:57
  • yes it does, but those so evaluating ALL processes, with mine, you could simply have a list of Mutexes and check for it. Besides, my solution was for something else - preventing your OWN application from opening TWICE. I simply misunderstood the question itself, by reading over it too quickly :) – Femaref Aug 16 '09 at 23:24
0

You can write a global hook.

What will be hooked is less important than the fact it will be global, and therefore, implemented in a separate DLL. In that library you properly handle attaching to a new module. If you detect process duplicate — kill it.

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