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I'm using Pandas data frames. I have a initial data frame, say D. I extract two data frames from it like this:

A = D[D.label == k]
B = D[D.label != k]

I want to combine A and B so I can have them as one DataFrame, something like a union operation. The order of the data is not important. However, when we sample A and B from D, they retain their indexes from D.

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186

I believe you can use the append method

bigdata = data1.append(data2, ignore_index=True)

to keep their indexes just dont use the ignore_index keyword ...

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  • 1
    This works. It creates a new DataFrame though. Is there a way to do it inline? That would be nice for when I'm loading huge amounts of data from a database in batches so I could iteratively update the DataFrame without creating a copy each time. – Andrew Nov 5 '13 at 17:36
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    Yes, that's possible, see: stackoverflow.com/a/46661368/5717580 – martin-martin Oct 10 '17 at 7:55
109

You can also use pd.concat, which is particularly helpful when you are joining more than two dataframes:

bigdata = pd.concat([data1, data2], ignore_index=True, sort=False)
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  • I want to use this, but I'm trying to concatenate two columns of the same name o_O – lifelonglearner Apr 1 '20 at 2:13
57

Thought to add this here in case someone finds it useful. @ostrokach already mentioned how you can merge the data frames across rows which is

df_row_merged = pd.concat([df_a, df_b], ignore_index=True)

To merge across columns, you can use the following syntax:

df_col_merged = pd.concat([df_a, df_b], axis=1)
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15

There's another solution for the case that you are working with big data and need to concatenate multiple datasets. Calling concat many times can get performance-intensive. If you don't want to create a new df each time, you can instead aggregate the changes and call concat only once:

frames = [ process_file(f) for f in dataset_files ]
result = pd.concat(frames)

(as pointed out here in the docs at the bottom of the section):

Note: It is worth noting however, that concat (and therefore append) makes a full copy of the data, and that constantly reusing this function can create a significant performance hit. If you need to use the operation over several datasets, use a list comprehension.

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    I think there should be pd.concat(frames) since pandas doesn't have append method. – My Work Jan 4 at 9:37
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    I don't fully undestand the list "comprehension" focus. What's important here is not calling append every time and hence gathering all the dataframes into a list first. Whether that list is established through a list comprehension or not is completely irrelevant. – MrR Apr 27 at 19:06
  • Thanks for the very relevant comments, I updated the answer to address them. – martin-martin May 14 at 7:55
4

If you want to update/replace the values of first dataframe df1 with the values of second dataframe df2. you can do it by following steps —

Step 1: Set index of the first dataframe (df1)

df1.set_index('id')

Step 2: Set index of the second dataframe (df2)

df2.set_index('id')

and finally update the dataframe using the following snippet —

df1.update(df2)

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