8

I am interested in iterating through (re: find and replace purposes), say:

List<String> someList = new ArrayList<String>();

where someList is already populated in an earlier method, and consists of, say just a couple elements, in the fashion of, call it [a:bX, b:Xc],

where the find-and-replace String(s) of interest are, say:

String someString = "X";
String otherString = "Y";
String contentsTBD = "";

Now, ideally I thought I could've iterated over someList like so:

public void readAndReplace() {
    for (int i = 0; i < someList.size(); i++) {
        if (someList.get(i).contains(someString)) {
            someList.get(i).replace(someString, otherString);
        } else {
            ++i;
        }
    }
    System.out.print(someList);
}

wherein the printout should read:

[a:bY, b:Yc]  

Then, I thought this might work:

public void readAndReplace() {
    for (String s : someList) {
        contentsTBD += s;
    }
    for (int i = 0; i < contentsTBD.length(); i++) {
        if (contentsTBD.contains(someString)) {
            contentsTBD.replaceAll(someString, otherString);
        } else {
            ++i;
        }
    }
    System.out.print(contentsTBD);
}

but then quickly realized that this was nonsensical since my reference to i was lost. Any advice would be really helpful. Thank you.

  • 1
    I don't understand what's the problem with your first attempt. – Luiggi Mendoza Oct 12 '12 at 5:37
  • replace doesnot modify the existing String. You need to re-assign the new string. Plus it will also not modify the list. You need to create a new list. – Rohit Jain Oct 12 '12 at 5:43
9
  • First, you are not storing your Replaced String anywhere. It is gone with the wind.

  • Second, your replace will not modify the existing list. You would need to set the new string into the existing location, since you are using traditional for-loop. Or, you can have a new list, and add modified values to that list.

  • Remember, since String in Java is immutable, so all the methods of String class return a new string. They do not modify the existing one. So, you need to re-assign the returned String into a new one.

Try out this code: -

 public void readAndReplace()
    {
      // You can also create a new list out of the existing list.
      // That way, you won't need to modify the existing one.
      List<String> newList = new ArrayList<String>();
      for(int i = 0; i < someList .size(); i++)
      {
          if(someList.get(i).contains(someString))
          {
              newList.add(someList.get(i).replace(someString, otherString));
             //someList.set(i, someList.get(i).replace(someString, otherString));
          } else {

              // If it not contains `someString`, add it as it is to newList
              newList.add(someList.get(i));
          }

       }
       System.out.println(someList);  // Original
       System.out.println(newList);   // New List

    }
  • +1 I liked the use two lists as an example, but you have updated the code, none-the-less, nice. – MadProgrammer Oct 12 '12 at 5:50
  • @MadProgrammer. I'll add it again.. I though we can set it into the existing list itself. So. – Rohit Jain Oct 12 '12 at 5:51
  • I just like the idea that your example provide a comparison between the lists, thought it was neat :) – MadProgrammer Oct 12 '12 at 5:53
7

Edited added explanation,after the suggestion of MadProgrammer,

Point 1: String is Immutable, and you are trying to modify the string with someList.get(i).replace(someString, otherString); that will work, but not get reflected inside your someList, to reflect your someList you have to call the someList.set(i)

Point 2: Your else block is useless as you already incrementing the i inside the for loop

try this.

  String oldStr="";
    for (int i = 0; i < someList.size(); i++) {
        if (someList.get(i).contains(someString)) {
            oldStr = someList.get(i).replace(someString, otherString);
            someList.set(i, oldStr);
        } 
    }
    System.out.print(someList);

see how Immutable work in java immutable

  • Not that you answer is wrong (it's not), but why is it right?? ;) – MadProgrammer Oct 12 '12 at 5:57
  • @ MadProgrammer, String is Immutable, so it not get reflected with t changes made at someList.get(i).replace(someString, otherString); line. I also added a link of immutable – subodh Oct 12 '12 at 6:01
  • Add the explanation to you answer and I will give you an up-vote ;) – MadProgrammer Oct 12 '12 at 6:05
  • @MadProgrammer, thanks a lot for suggestion to add the explanation. – subodh Oct 12 '12 at 6:25
  • Much better :D - personally, better try and teach some one to fish – MadProgrammer Oct 12 '12 at 6:27
5

I know this question is pretty old, but I was just looking for the same thing and figured I'd add what I found for the sake of others.

The easiest way I found to do this is with the ListIterator class which is a sub interface of Iterator that is meant for working specifically with Lists. It makes this kind of operation pretty simple:

public void replace(List<String> list) {
    ListIterator<String> it = list.listIterator();
    while(it.hasNext()) {
        it.set(it.next().replace("old_text","new_text"));
    }
}

It obviates the need to work with indices which is nice.

2

The problem is that String is immutable, so it's not modified in-place in your List and you need to update it:

someList.set(i, someList.get(i).replace(someString, otherString);

You also don't need the else block, or you'll skip one more element.

2

I think your problem relates to the fact that strings are immutable (that is, there contents can't be changed).

This statement in your first example doesn't actually do anything...

someList.get(i).replace(someString, otherString);

I would probably do something like

for(int i = 0; i < someList .size(); i++)
{
    String value = someList.get(i);
    if(value.contains(someString))
    {

      value = value.replace(someString, otherString);

      someList.set(i, value);

    }
}

Also, I don't know why you are incrementing i in the else condition

  • Really, I gotta do more maths :P – MadProgrammer Oct 12 '12 at 5:59
0

What is the problem with first approach?
It should have worked if you remove the else block ('i' will already be incremented by for-loop).

Also, your second approach doesn't make sense, you are not using i inside the inner for loop, except to increment it, which should not be required(is it?)

  • The first approach will fail because strings are immutable and he's not replacing the values within in the list – MadProgrammer Oct 12 '12 at 5:55
  • oh yes, you are right! It will be required to put(replace) the new string back in list. – Aditya Jain Oct 12 '12 at 6:19
0

You can try something like this :

  1. Store the values within ArrayList first.
  2. Use Iterator as you are using Generics.

    List<String> somelist = new ArrayList<String>();
    
    someList.add("Y");
    someList.add("X");
    someList.add("Z");
    
    Iterator itr = someList.iterator();
    while(itr.hasNext){
    String a = itr.next();
    String b = "Y";
    
    if(a.contains(b)){
    String c = b.replace("A");
    System.out.println(c);
    
    }
    else{
    System.out.println(b);
    
    }
    

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