In my C#/XAML metro app, there's a button which kicks off a long-running process. So, as recommended, I'm using async/await to make sure the UI thread doesn't get blocked:

private async void Button_Click_1(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e) 
{
     await GetResults();
}

private async Task GetResults()
{ 
     // Do lot of complex stuff that takes a long time
     // (e.g. contact some web services)
  ...
}

Occasionally, the stuff happening within GetResults would require additional user input before it can continue. For simplicity, let's say the user just has to click a "continue" button.

My question is: how can I suspend the execution of GetResults in such a way that it awaits an event such as the click of another button?

Here's an ugly way to achieve what I'm looking for: the event handler for the continue" button sets a flag...

private bool _continue = false;
private void buttonContinue_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    _continue = true;
}

... and GetResults periodically polls it:

 buttonContinue.Visibility = Visibility.Visible;
 while (!_continue) await Task.Delay(100);  // poll _continue every 100ms
 buttonContinue.Visibility = Visibility.Collapsed;

The polling is clearly terrible (busy waiting / waste of cycles) and I'm looking for something event-based.

Any ideas?

Btw in this simplified example, one solution would be of course to split up GetResults() into two parts, invoke the first part from the start button and the second part from the continue button. In reality, the stuff happening in GetResults is more complex and different types of user input can be required at different points within the execution. So breaking up the logic into multiple methods would be non-trivial.

up vote 185 down vote accepted

You can use an instance of the SemaphoreSlim Class as a signal:

private SemaphoreSlim signal = new SemaphoreSlim(0, 1);

// set signal in event
signal.Release();

// wait for signal somewhere else
await signal.WaitAsync();

Alternatively, you can use an instance of the TaskCompletionSource<T> Class to create a Task<T> that represents the result of the button click:

private TaskCompletionSource<bool> tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<bool>();

// complete task in event
tcs.SetResult(true);

// wait for task somewhere else
await tcs.Task;
  • 5
    @DanielHilgarth ManualResetEvent(Slim) doesn't seem to support WaitAsync(). – svick Oct 12 '12 at 12:13
  • 3
    @DanielHilgarth No, you couldn't. async doesn't mean “runs on a different thread”, or something like that. It just means “you can use await in this method”. And in this case, blocking inside GetResults() would actually block the UI thread. – svick Oct 12 '12 at 12:24
  • 2
    @casperOne My point is that there is no code in this question that explicitly creates a Task, so all of the code will run on the UI thread. – svick Oct 12 '12 at 14:06
  • 13
    +1. I had to look this up, so just in case others are interested: SemaphoreSlim.WaitAsync does not just push the Wait onto a thread pool thread. SemaphoreSlim has a proper queue of Tasks that are used to implement WaitAsync. – Stephen Cleary Oct 12 '12 at 20:29
  • 11
    TaskCompletionSource<T> + await .Task + .SetResult() turns out to be the perfect solution for my scenario - thanks! :-) – Max Oct 16 '12 at 20:58

When you have an unusual thing you need to await on, the easiest answer is often TaskCompletionSource (or some async-enabled primitive based on TaskCompletionSource).

In this case, your need is quite simple, so you can just use TaskCompletionSource directly:

private TaskCompletionSource<object> continueClicked;

private async void Button_Click_1(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e) 
{
  // Note: You probably want to disable this button while "in progress" so the
  //  user can't click it twice.
  await GetResults();
  // And re-enable the button here, possibly in a finally block.
}

private async Task GetResults()
{ 
  // Do lot of complex stuff that takes a long time
  // (e.g. contact some web services)

  // Wait for the user to click Continue.
  continueClicked = new TaskCompletionSource<object>();
  buttonContinue.Visibility = Visibility.Visible;
  await continueClicked.Task;
  buttonContinue.Visibility = Visibility.Collapsed;

  // More work...
}

private void buttonContinue_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
  if (continueClicked != null)
    continueClicked.TrySetResult(null);
}

Logically, TaskCompletionSource is like an async ManualResetEvent, except that you can only "set" the event once and the event can have a "result" (in this case, we're not using it, so we just set the result to null).

  • 5
    Since I parse "await an event" as basically the same situation as 'wrap EAP in a task', I'd definitely prefer this approach. IMHO, it's definitely simpler / easier-to-reason-about code. – James Manning Oct 12 '12 at 15:38

Ideally, you don't. While you certainly can block the async thread, that's a waste of resources, and not ideal.

Consider the canonical example where the user goes to lunch while the button is waiting to be clicked.

If you have halted your asynchronous code while waiting for the input from the user, then it's just wasting resources while that thread is paused.

That said, it's better if in your asynchronous operation, you set the state that you need to maintain to the point where the button is enabled and you're "waiting" on a click. At that point, your GetResults method stops.

Then, when the button is clicked, based on the state that you have stored, you start another asynchronous task to continue the work.

Because the SynchronizationContext will be captured in the event handler that calls GetResults (the compiler will do this as a result of using the await keyword being used, and the fact that SynchronizationContext.Current should be non-null, given you are in a UI application), you can use async/await like so:

private async void Button_Click_1(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e) 
{
     await GetResults();

     // Show dialog/UI element.  This code has been marshaled
     // back to the UI thread because the SynchronizationContext
     // was captured behind the scenes when
     // await was called on the previous line.
     ...

     // Check continue, if true, then continue with another async task.
     if (_continue) await ContinueToGetResultsAsync();
}

private bool _continue = false;
private void buttonContinue_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    _continue = true;
}

private async Task GetResults()
{ 
     // Do lot of complex stuff that takes a long time
     // (e.g. contact some web services)
  ...
}

ContinueToGetResultsAsync is the method that continues to get the results in the event that your button is pushed. If your button is not pushed, then your event handler does nothing.

  • What async thread? There is no code that will not run on the UI thread, both in the original question and in your answer. – svick Oct 12 '12 at 13:53
  • @svick Not true. GetResults returns a Task. await simply says "run the task, and when the task is done, continue the code after this". Given that there is a synchronization context, the call is marshaled back to the UI thread, as it's captured on the await. await is not the same as Task.Wait(), not in the least. – casperOne Oct 12 '12 at 13:59
  • I didn't say anything about Wait(). But the code in GetResults() will run on the UI thread here, there is no other thread. In other words, yes, await basically does run the task, like you say, but here, that task also runs on the UI thread. – svick Oct 12 '12 at 14:01
  • @svick There's no reason to make the assumption that the task runs on the UI thread, why do you make that assumption? It's possible, but unlikely. And the call is two separate UI calls, technically, one up to the await and then the code after await, there is no blocking. The rest of the code is marshaled back in a continuation and scheduled through the SynchronizationContext. – casperOne Oct 12 '12 at 14:03
  • 1
    For others who want to see more, see here: chat.stackoverflow.com/rooms/17937 - @svick and I basically misunderstood each other, but were saying the same thing. – casperOne Oct 12 '12 at 14:27

Here is a utility class that I use:

public class AsyncEventListener
{
    private readonly Func<bool> _predicate;

    public AsyncEventListener() : this(() => true)
    {

    }

    public AsyncEventListener(Func<bool> predicate)
    {
        _predicate = predicate;
        Successfully = new Task(() => { });
    }

    public void Listen(object sender, EventArgs eventArgs)
    {
        if (!Successfully.IsCompleted && _predicate.Invoke())
        {
            Successfully.RunSynchronously();
        }
    }

    public Task Successfully { get; }
}

And here is how I use it:

var itChanged = new AsyncEventListener();
someObject.PropertyChanged += itChanged.Listen;

// ... make it change ...

await itChanged.Successfully;
someObject.PropertyChanged -= itChanged.Listen;

Stephen Toub published this AsyncManualResetEvent class on his blog.

public class AsyncManualResetEvent 
{ 
    private volatile TaskCompletionSource<bool> m_tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<bool>();

    public Task WaitAsync() { return m_tcs.Task; } 

    public void Set() 
    { 
        var tcs = m_tcs; 
        Task.Factory.StartNew(s => ((TaskCompletionSource<bool>)s).TrySetResult(true), 
            tcs, CancellationToken.None, TaskCreationOptions.PreferFairness, TaskScheduler.Default); 
        tcs.Task.Wait(); 
    }

    public void Reset() 
    { 
        while (true) 
        { 
            var tcs = m_tcs; 
            if (!tcs.Task.IsCompleted || 
                Interlocked.CompareExchange(ref m_tcs, new TaskCompletionSource<bool>(), tcs) == tcs) 
                return; 
        } 
    } 
}

Simple Helper Class:

public class EventAwaiter<TEventArgs>
{
    private readonly TaskCompletionSource<TEventArgs> _eventArrived = new TaskCompletionSource<TEventArgs>();

    private readonly Action<EventHandler<TEventArgs>> _unsubscribe;

    public EventAwaiter(Action<EventHandler<TEventArgs>> subscribe, Action<EventHandler<TEventArgs>> unsubscribe)
    {
        subscribe(Subscription);
        _unsubscribe = unsubscribe;
    }

    public Task<TEventArgs> Task => _eventArrived.Task;

    private EventHandler<TEventArgs> Subscription => (s, e) =>
        {
            _eventArrived.TrySetResult(e);
            _unsubscribe(Subscription);
        };
}

Usage:

var valueChangedEventAwaiter = new EventAwaiter<YourEventArgs>(
                            h => example.YourEvent += h,
                            h => example.YourEvent -= h);
await valueChangedEventAwaiter.Task;
  • 1
    How would you cleanup the subscription to example.YourEvent? – Denis P Mar 9 at 19:39
  • @DenisP perhaps pass the event into constructor for EventAwaiter? – CJBrew Mar 19 at 14:06
  • @DenisP I improved the version and run a short test. – Felix Keil Mar 19 at 14:51
  • I could see adding IDisposable as well, depending on circumstances. Also, to avoid having to type in the event twice, we could also use Reflection to pass the event name, so then the usage is even simpler. Otherwise, I like the pattern, thank you. – Denis P Mar 21 at 15:35

With Reactive Extensions (Rx.Net)

var eventObservable = Observable
            .FromEventPattern<EventArgs>(
                h => example.YourEvent += h,
                h => example.YourEvent -= h);

var res = await eventObservable.FirstAsync();

You can add Rx with Nuget Package System.Reactive

Tested Sample:

    private static event EventHandler<EventArgs> _testEvent;

    private static async Task Main()
    {
        var eventObservable = Observable
            .FromEventPattern<EventArgs>(
                h => _testEvent += h,
                h => _testEvent -= h);

        Task.Delay(5000).ContinueWith(_ => _testEvent?.Invoke(null, new EventArgs()));

        var res = await eventObservable.FirstAsync();

        Console.WriteLine("Event got fired");
    }
  • Any suggestions for improvement? I think it is a good and valid answer. – Felix Keil Oct 9 at 13:58
  • I'm especially concerned by this downvote, because Rx is beautiful and the usage should be considered for every asynchronous program. – Felix Keil Oct 10 at 15:52
  • Because of the second downvote I updated the answer to show that it is working. If somebody could explain to me what is wrong with my answer? – Felix Keil Nov 6 at 13:42

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