4

So I am making a small game in C++ and I have run across a problem. I have a class called player inside my player.h file, and inside this class I have a public function called getPotion(). I also have a private static variable called potion. I have the exact same thing for the players health, and the getHealth() function returns the private static int playerHealth perfectly. But for apparently no reason, the getPotion function doesn't return the potion. I get an error instead. I've also included the header file in all my other files.

Here's the code:

(Sorry, I don't know how to insert code, so I have to write it out)

player.h (the code that I'm having trouble with):

class Player{
private:
    static int potions;

public:
    int getPotions();
}

player.cpp (again the code I have trouble with):

int Player::potions;

int Player::getPotions(){
    Player player;
    return player.potions;
}

I have probably left out some bits of code like return and such, but that's because I have a small amount of time to ask this question, so I put the parts that related to my problem.

7
  • 1
    Why do you create a new Player in the getPotions function? Whatever thought process led you to think that was something sensible to do needs to be re-examined. Oct 13 '12 at 1:39
  • 2
    Also, you almost certainly don't want potions to be declared static.
    – Robᵩ
    Oct 13 '12 at 1:40
  • @Robᵩ: Exactly. If there were two Players, each would need their own count of the number of potions they have. So it should not be static. Oct 13 '12 at 1:41
  • Ok, Ive changed it so its not static anymore, but how do I call it now?
    – CMP6LG
    Oct 13 '12 at 1:44
  • 1
    When asking about something that does not compile, you should provide the compiler error and line. Oct 13 '12 at 1:54
7

First off, you are trying to return a static member of a class as if it were instantiated member of the object. Static members are referred to by Class::member, not object.member.

Second, I don't think you want potions to be static. Static members are shared between all objects of the class. So if player A has 100 health potions, then player B would have the same 100 health potions.

Third, you declare Player::potions at the top of your .cpp file. I don't think that's what you want. The potions member was already declared in your .h file.

player.h:

class Player
{
    private:
        int potions;

    public:
        int getPotions();
};

player.cpp:

int Player::getPotions()
{
    return potions;
}

If you DID want potions to be static, then change it to:

return Player::potions;
0
1

Try changing

Player player;
return player.potions;

to simply

return potions;

You're creating a new player and returning that object's potions, not the potions of the "this" object.

2
  • potions is static. The way his class is designed, instances don't have potions. Oct 13 '12 at 1:40
  • @DavidSchwarts, yep this needs to be fixed as well. My oversight.
    – jedwards
    Oct 13 '12 at 1:43

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