I have very little knowledge about Ruby and cant find a way to create 2d array. Can anyone provide me some snippets or information to get me started?

  • Take a look at this : stackoverflow.com/questions/1720932/… I think use Hash is a good idea – Ta Duy Anh Oct 13 '12 at 17:26
  • Thanks to all. I read about zipping(like python`s one),hash but in the end i create the array just like @JunaidKirkire suggested – Alex Oct 14 '12 at 9:02
up vote 11 down vote accepted
irb(main):001:0> a = []
=> []
irb(main):002:0> a1 = [1, 2]
=> [1, 2]
irb(main):003:0> a2 = [3, 4]
=> [3, 4]
irb(main):004:0> a.push a1             
=> [[1, 2]]
irb(main):005:0> a.push a2
=> [[1, 2], [3, 4]]
irb(main):006:0> a
=> [[1, 2], [3, 4]]
irb(main):007:0> a[0]
=> [1, 2]
irb(main):008:0> a[0][1]
=> 2
  • 1
    Good explanation of creating a 2D array but I does not seem to answer the second part of the question about iterating the 2D array. Currently, the full answer means you should read both this and simonmenke answers - which may be confusing. :) – not a patch Sep 2 '15 at 15:37
a = [[1, 2], [3, 4]]
a.each do |sub|
  sub.each do |int|
    puts int
  end
end
# Output:
#   1
#   2
#   3
#   4

or:

a = [[1, 2], [3, 4]]
a.each do |(x, y)|
  puts x + y
end
# Output:
#   3
#   7
  • 2
    That second form is very nice. Where is it documented? – FelipeC May 9 '14 at 6:28

The easiest way to create a 2d array is by the following:

arr1 = Array.new(3) { Array.new(3)}

The code above creates a 2D array with three rows and three columns.

Cheers.

  • This is the best answer for this question (for the creation part anyway) – Dylanthepiguy Aug 26 '17 at 5:38

Ruby doesn't have the concept of 2-dimensional arrays like C does. Arrays in Ruby are dynamic -- meaning you can resize them a will. They can contain any object or value in each "slot" - including another Array!

In the examples given by @JunaidKirkire and @simonmenke, you have an array which has arrays for its values. You can access the values using the syntax similar to C - but you could also have the case where one slot is an Array and another is just a number, or a String, or a Hash...

You may want to work through a Ruby tutorial to get a better idea of how it works. I like RubyMonk but there are other good ones out there as well.

Addition to the array would follow the following format [row]x[col]:

arr1 = Array.new(3) { Array.new(3)}
arr1[0][0] = 4
arr1[0][1] = 5
arr1[1][0] = 6
arr1[1][1] = 7
p arr1
=> [[4, 5, nil], [6, 7, nil], [nil, nil, nil]]

The second constraint is completely arbitrary since without it you can have jagged arrays. Depends on need.

arr1 = Array.new(5) {Array.new()}
arr1[0][0] = 4
arr1[0][1] = 5
arr1[1][0] = 6
arr1[1][1] = 7
p arr1 
=> [[4, 5], [6, 7], [], [], []]

arr1 = Array.new(5) {Array.new()}
arr1[0][0] = 4
arr1[0][1] = 5
arr1[1][0] = 6
arr1[1][1] = 7
arr1[1][2] = 8
arr1[1][5] = 9
p arr1
=> [[4, 5], [6, 7, 8, nil, nil, 9], [], [], []]

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