72

I am trying to master async method syntax in .NET 4.5. I thought I had understood the examples exactly however no matter what the type of the async method is (ie Task<T>), I always get the same type of error error on the conversion back to T - which I understood was pretty much automatic. The following code produces the error:

Cannot implicitly convert type 'System.Threading.Tasks.Task<System.Collections.Generic.List<int>>' to 'System.Collections.Generic.List<int>'

public List<int> TestGetMethod()
{
    return GetIdList(); // compiler error on this line
}


async Task<List<int>> GetIdList()
{
    using (HttpClient proxy = new HttpClient())
    {
        string response = await proxy.GetStringAsync("www.test.com");
        List<int> idList = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<List<int>>();
        return idList;
    }
}

It fails if I explicitly cast the result as well. This:

public List<int> TestGetMethod()
{
    return (List<int>)GetIdList();  // compiler error on this line
}

somewhat predictably results in this error:

Cannot convert type 'System.Threading.Tasks.Task<System.Collections.Generic.List<int>>' to 'System.Collections.Generic.List<int>'

Any help greatly appreciated.

7
  • 4
    The 'automatic unwrapping' of Task<T> to T is the effect of await'ing the task. If you change TestGetMethod to be async then it could await GetIdList() to get the T into a local var Oct 14, 2012 at 21:47
  • 1
    Unrelated, but convention would recommend GetIdListAsync() although not a big deal for internal use, of course. :) Oct 14, 2012 at 21:48
  • 1
    Thanks for your replies James. I had previously tried that but if I change GetTestMethod() to use await, then it must also be async so then I would need to change it's type to Task<List<int>> as well. And then it's caller will have the same issue as GetTestMethod() does now?
    – PaulR
    Oct 14, 2012 at 22:01
  • OK I think I understand now - if I make GetTestMethod() void, then this does not happen. But as long as a method has a return type, it's caller must also be async and use await in the call etc.
    – PaulR
    Oct 14, 2012 at 22:22
  • 1
    When you call something that returns a Task, you don't have to use await. It really depends on what the caller is supposed to do with it. Fire and forget? Schedule a continuation on it? Block until it completes? Something else? For a test method, assuming you can use a test framework that supports async test methods, I'd use await in an async test method, but there are other options. Oct 15, 2012 at 1:31

5 Answers 5

105

The main issue with your example that you can't implicitly convert Task<T> return types to the base T type. You need to use the Task.Result property. Note that Task.Result will block async code, and should be used carefully.

Try this instead:

public List<int> TestGetMethod()  
{  
    return GetIdList().Result;  
}
2
35

You need to make TestGetMethod async too and attach await in front of GetIdList(); will unwrap the task to List<int>, So if your helper function is returning Task make sure you have await as you are calling the function async too.

public Task<List<int>> TestGetMethod()
{
    return GetIdList();
}    

async Task<List<int>> GetIdList()
{
    using (HttpClient proxy = new HttpClient())
    {
        string response = await proxy.GetStringAsync("www.test.com");
        List<int> idList = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<List<int>>();
        return idList;
    }
}

Another option

public async void TestGetMethod(List<int> results)
{
    results = await GetIdList(); // await will unwrap the List<int>
}
2
  • Note that because there's nothing else going on in this TestGetMethod, doing the unwrap+rewrap is a tad silly and it could remove the async and await and just return GetIdList() :) Oct 15, 2012 at 1:33
  • 1
    what is the need that TestGetMethod has to be async? Feb 2, 2013 at 1:25
3

Depending on what you're trying to do, you can either block with GetIdList().Result ( generally a bad idea, but it's hard to tell the context) or use a test framework that supports async test methods and have the test method do var results = await GetIdList();

1

I've just had this issue. I was trying to return a value, but it could not be implicitly cast to a type of Task. The solution was to add the missing async keyword that I forgot to add.

0

I just had the same issue pop up but the resolution was different than the others. I'm working with two async calls within an async method, this code is what was giving me the error:

var fileContents = reader.ReadToEndAsync();
if (fileContents != null)
{
     var profile = await Task.Run(() => JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<T>(fileContents));
     return profile;
}

This is the fix. I had forgotten the async on the first line:

var fileContents = await reader.ReadToEndAsync();
if (fileContents != null)
{
     var profile = await Task.Run(() => JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<T>(fileContents));
     return profile;
}

The error message was showing on "fileContents" on the line var profile = ... So it wasn't immediately obvious of where the error was.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.