153

I want to do something like this:

myList = [10, 20, 30]
yourList = myList.append(40)

Unfortunately, list append does not return the modified list.

So, how can I allow append to return the new list?


See also: Why do these list operations (methods) return None, rather than the resulting list?

9 Answers 9

244

Don't use append but concatenation instead:

yourList = myList + [40]

This returns a new list; myList will not be affected. If you need to have myList affected as well either use .append() anyway, then assign yourList separately from (a copy of) myList.

12
  • 4
    what would have been the rationale behind append() returning None instead of the same list ? Which zen principle would it violate ? May 12, 2017 at 18:54
  • 4
    @CiprianTomoiaga: see en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Command%E2%80%93query_separation; list.append is a command, not a query.
    – Martijn Pieters
    May 12, 2017 at 19:11
  • 2
    @CiprianTomoiaga: also see this email from the Python BDFL.
    – Martijn Pieters
    May 12, 2017 at 19:13
  • 2
    @Dieblitzen: right, so OCaml uses linked lists and connects those. Python lists are not immutable so you can't do that with those, and moreover, everything else can be mutable. While an OCaml list contains immutable objects, in Python the contents of immutable objects such as tuples can still be mutable, so you can't share the contents with other containers when concatenating.
    – Martijn Pieters
    Dec 21, 2018 at 11:49
  • 2
    @Dieblitzen: which is why in Python, for a concatenation operation to be valid, you must create a shallow copy, and pay the O(N) time. I should have been more explicit, sorry.
    – Martijn Pieters
    Dec 21, 2018 at 11:49
62

In python 3 you may create new list by unpacking old one and adding new element:

a = [1,2,3]
b = [*a,4] # b = [1,2,3,4] 

when you do:

myList + [40]

You actually have 3 lists.

1
  • 2
    And it's a bit faster
    – aerobiomat
    Jan 23, 2019 at 9:59
10

Unfortunately, none of the answers here solve exactly what was asked. Here is a simple approach:

lst = [1, 2, 3]
lst.append(4) or lst  # the returned value here would be the OP's `yourList`
# [1, 2, 3, 4]

One may ask the real need of doing this, like when someone needs to improve RAM usage, do micro-benchmarks etc. that are, usually, useless. However, sometimes someone is really "asking what was asked" (I don't know if this is the case here) and the reality is more diverse than we can know of. So here is a (contrived because out-of-a-context) usage... Instead of doing this:

dic = {"a": [1], "b": [2], "c": [3]}

key, val = "d", 4  # <- example
if key in dic:
    dic[key].append(val)
else:
    dic[key] = [val]
dic
#  {'a': [1], 'b': [2], 'c': [3], 'd': [4]}

key, val = "b", 5  # <- example
if key in dic:
    dic[key].append(val)
else:
    dic[key] = [val]
dic
#  {'a': [1], 'b': [2, 5], 'c': [3], 'd': [4]}

One can use the OR expression above in any place an expression is needed (instead of a statement):

key, val = "d", 4  # <- example
dic[key] = dic[key].append(val) or dic[key] if key in dic else [val]
#  {'a': [1], 'b': [2], 'c': [3], 'd': [4]}

key, val = "b", 5  # <- example
dic[key] = dic[key].append(val) or dic[key] if key in dic else [val]
#  {'a': [1], 'b': [2, 5], 'c': [3], 'd': [4]}

Or, equivalently, when there are no falsy values in the lists, one can try dic.get(key, <default value>) in some better way.

7

list.append is a built-in and therefore cannot be changed. But if you're willing to use something other than append, you could try +:

In [106]: myList = [10,20,30]

In [107]: yourList = myList + [40]

In [108]: print myList
[10, 20, 30]

In [109]: print yourList
[10, 20, 30, 40]

Of course, the downside to this is that a new list is created which takes a lot more time than append

Hope this helps

3
  • But the built-in can be subclassed and then anything goes :) Oct 15, 2012 at 20:06
  • @MarcinWyszynski: yes, but they can only be modified within the subclass. The built-in method of a built-in object/class can rarely be overwritten, if ever Oct 15, 2012 at 20:12
  • 4
    For your own sanity and that of your coworkers you should never ever do that :) Oct 15, 2012 at 20:48
4

Try using itertools.chain(myList, [40]). That will return a generator as a sequence, rather than allocating a new list. Essentially, that returns all of the elements from the first iterable until it is exhausted, then proceeds to the next iterable, until all of the iterables are exhausted.

2

Just to expand on Storstamp's answer

You only need to do myList.append(40)

It will append it to the original list,now you can return the variable containing the original list.

If you are working with very large lists this is the way to go.

1

You can subclass the built-in list type and redefine the 'append' method. Or even better, create a new one which will do what you want it to do. Below is the code for a redefined 'append' method.

#!/usr/bin/env python

class MyList(list):

  def append(self, element):
    return MyList(self + [element])


def main():
  l = MyList()
  l1 = l.append(1)
  l2 = l1.append(2)
  l3 = l2.append(3)
  print "Original list: %s, type %s" % (l, l.__class__.__name__)
  print "List 1: %s, type %s" % (l1, l1.__class__.__name__)
  print "List 2: %s, type %s" % (l2, l2.__class__.__name__)
  print "List 3: %s, type %s" % (l3, l3.__class__.__name__)


if __name__ == '__main__':
  main()

Hope that helps.

0

To have a new list returned when doing something like this

a = [1, 2, 3]
b = [4, 5]
a.append(b)
print(a)
[1, 2, 3, [4, 5]]

do this instead (notice the square brackets around b)

a = [1, 2, 3]
b = [4, 5]
c = a + [b]
print(c)
[1, 2, 3, [4, 5]]
-6

You only need to do myList.append(40)

It will append it to the original list, not return a new list.

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