I wrote this:

public static class EnumerableExtensions
{
    public static int IndexOf<T>(this IEnumerable<T> obj, T value)
    {
        return obj
            .Select((a, i) => (a.Equals(value)) ? i : -1)
            .Max();
    }

    public static int IndexOf<T>(this IEnumerable<T> obj, T value
           , IEqualityComparer<T> comparer)
    {
        return obj
            .Select((a, i) => (comparer.Equals(a, value)) ? i : -1)
            .Max();
    }
}

But I don't know if it already exists, does it?

  • 4
    The problem with a Max approach is that a: it keeps looking, and b: it returns the last index when there are duplicates (people usually expect the first index) – Marc Gravell Aug 17 '09 at 21:46
  • 1
    geekswithblogs.net compares 4 solutions and their performance. The ToList()/FindIndex() trick performs best – nixda Jan 31 '16 at 15:10

11 Answers 11

up vote 45 down vote accepted

The whole point of getting things out as IEnumerable is so you can lazily iterate over the contents. As such, there isn't really a concept of an index. What you are doing really doesn't make a lot of sense for an IEnumerable. If you need something that supports access by index, put it in an actual list or collection.

  • 5
    Currently I came accross this thread because I'm implementing a generic IList<> wrapper for the IEnumerable<> type in order to use my IEnumerable<> objects with third party components which only support datasources of type IList. I agree that trying to get an index of an element within an IEnumerable object is probably in most cases a sign of something beign done wrong there are times when finding such index once beats reproducing a large collection in memory just for the sake of finding the index of a single element when you already have an IEnumerable. – jpierson Nov 11 '09 at 17:53
  • 169
    -1 cause: There are legitimate reasons why you want to get an index out of a IEnumerable<>. I don't buy the whole "you shoul'd be doing this" dogma. – ja72 Dec 14 '10 at 18:40
  • 62
    Agree with @ja72; if you shouldn't be dealing with indexes with IEnumerable then Enumerable.ElementAt would not exist. IndexOf is simply the inverse -- any argument against it must apply equally to ElementAt. – Kirk Woll Sep 3 '11 at 20:45
  • 5
    Cleary, C# misses the concept of IIndexableEnumerable. that would just be the equivalent of an "random accessible" concept, in C++ STL terminology. – v.oddou Mar 28 '13 at 4:02
  • 8
    extensions with overloads like Select((x, i) => ...) seem to imply that these indexes should exist – Michael Mar 19 '14 at 16:05

I'd question the wisdom, but perhaps:

source.TakeWhile(x => x != value).Count();

(using EqualityComparer<T>.Default to emulate != if needed) - but you need to watch to return -1 if not found... so perhaps just do it the long way

public static int IndexOf<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, T value)
{
    int index = 0;
    var comparer = EqualityComparer<T>.Default; // or pass in as a parameter
    foreach (T item in source)
    {
        if (comparer.Equals(item, value)) return index;
        index++;
    }
    return -1;
}
  • 7
    +1 for "questioning the wisdom". 9 times out of 10 it's probably a bad idea in the first place. – Joel Coehoorn Aug 17 '09 at 21:45
  • The explicit loop solution also runs 2x faster (in the worst case) than the Select().Max() solution too. – Steve Guidi Aug 17 '09 at 21:46
  • 8
    @Kamarey - no, that does something different. TakeWhile stops when it gets a failure; Count(predicate) returns the ones that match. i.e. if the first was a miss and everything else was true, TakeWhile(pred).Count() will report 0; Count(pred) will report n-1. – Marc Gravell Nov 26 '09 at 16:27
  • 1
    You right, I should think before posting sometime:) – Kamarey Nov 27 '09 at 17:11
  • 1
    TakeWhile is clever! Bear in mind though this returns Count if element doesn't exist which is a deviation from standard behaviour. – nawfal Nov 12 '17 at 11:50

I would implement it like this:

public static class EnumerableExtensions
{
    public static int IndexOf<T>(this IEnumerable<T> obj, T value)
    {
        return obj.IndexOf(value, null);
    }

    public static int IndexOf<T>(this IEnumerable<T> obj, T value, IEqualityComparer<T> comparer)
    {
        comparer = comparer ?? EqualityComparer<T>.Default;
        var found = obj
            .Select((a, i) => new { a, i })
            .FirstOrDefault(x => comparer.Equals(x.a, value));
        return found == null ? -1 : found.i;
    }
}
  • That's actually very cute, +1! It involves extra objects, but they should be relatively cheap (GEN0), so not a huge problem. The == might need work? – Marc Gravell Aug 17 '09 at 21:48
  • 1
    Added IEqualityComparer overload, in true LINQ style. ;) – dahlbyk Aug 17 '09 at 21:55
  • 1
    I think you mean to say ... comparer.Equals(x.a, value) =) – Marc Aug 17 '09 at 21:55
  • 1
    What's that saying... read what I mean, not what I type? :( – dahlbyk Aug 17 '09 at 21:59
  • 1
    Nice implementation, though one thing I'd suggest adding is a check to see if obj implements IList<T> and if so, defer to its IndexOf method just in case it has a type-specific optimization. – Josh Sep 17 '15 at 17:34

The way I'm currently doing this is a bit shorter than those already suggested and as far as I can tell gives the desired result:

 var index = haystack.ToList().IndexOf(needle);

It's a bit clunky, but it does the job and is fairly concise.

  • 2
    Though this would work for small collections, suppose you have a million items in the "haystack". Doing a ToList() on that will iterate through all one-million elements and add them to a list. Then it will search through the list to find the matching element's index. This would be extremely inefficient as well as the possibility of throwing an exception if the list gets too big. – esteuart Feb 13 '15 at 17:59
  • 2
    @esteuart Definitely - you need to choose an approach which suits your use case. I doubt there's a one size fits all solution, which is possibly why there isn't an implementation in the core libraries. – Mark Watts Feb 16 '15 at 9:42

I think the best option is to implement like this:

public static int IndexOf<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enumerable, T element, IEqualityComparer<T> comparer = null)
{
    int i = 0;
    comparer = comparer ?? EqualityComparer<T>.Default;
    foreach (var currentElement in enumerable)
    {
        if (comparer.Equals(currentElement, element))
        {
            return i;
        }

        i++;
    }

    return -1;
}

It will also not create the anonymous object

A bit late in the game, i know... but this is what i recently did. It is slightly different than yours, but allows the programmer to dictate what the equality operation needs to be (predicate). Which i find very useful when dealing with different types, since i then have a generic way of doing it regardless of object type and <T> built in equality operator.

It also has a very very small memory footprint, and is very, very fast/efficient... if you care about that.

At worse, you'll just add this to your list of extensions.

Anyway... here it is.

 public static int IndexOf<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, Func<T, bool> predicate)
 {
     int retval = -1;
     var enumerator = source.GetEnumerator();

     while (enumerator.MoveNext())
     {
         retval += 1;
         if (predicate(enumerator.Current))
         {
             IDisposable disposable = enumerator as System.IDisposable;
             if (disposable != null) disposable.Dispose();
             return retval;
         }
     }
     IDisposable disposable = enumerator as System.IDisposable;
     if (disposable != null) disposable.Dispose();
     return -1;
 }

Hopefully this helps someone.

  • Maybe I'm missing something, but why the GetEnumerator and MoveNext rather than just a foreach? – Josh Gallagher Jan 11 '15 at 23:30
  • 1
    Short answer? Efficiency. Long answer: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/9yb8xew9.aspx – MaxOvrdrv Jan 12 '15 at 23:58
  • 1
    Looking at the IL it appears that the performance difference is that a foreach will call Dispose on the enumerator if it implements IDisposable. (See stackoverflow.com/questions/4982396/…) As the code in this answer doesn't know if the result of calling GetEnumerator is or isn't disposable it should do the same. At that point I'm still unclear that there's a perf benefit, though there was some extra IL whose purpose didn't leap out at me! – Josh Gallagher Jan 13 '15 at 10:52
  • @JoshGallagher I did a bit of research a while back regarding perf benefits between foreach and for(i), and the main benefit of using for(i) was that it ByRefs the object in-place rather than re-creating it/passing it back ByVal. I would assume the same applies to MoveNext versus foreach, but i'm not sure about that one. Maybe they both use ByVal... – MaxOvrdrv Jan 13 '15 at 19:49
  • 2
    Reading this blog (blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2010/09/30/…) it may be that the "iterator loop" to which he is referring is a foreach loop, in which case for the particular case of T being a value type it might be saving a box/unbox operation by using the while loop. However, this isn't borne out by the IL I got from a version of your answer with foreach. I do still think the conditional disposal of the iterator is important, though. Could you modify the answer to include that? – Josh Gallagher Jan 14 '15 at 14:46

A few years later, but this uses Linq, returns -1 if not found, doesn't create extra objects, and should short-circuit when found [as opposed to iterating over the entire IEnumerable]:

public static int IndexOf<T>(this IEnumerable<T> list, T item)
{
    return list.Select((x, index) => EqualityComparer<T>.Default.Equals(item, x)
                                     ? index
                                     : -1)
               .FirstOr(x => x != -1, -1);
}

Where 'FirstOr' is:

public static T FirstOr<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, T alternate)
{
    return source.DefaultIfEmpty(alternate)
                 .First();
}

public static T FirstOr<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, Func<T, bool> predicate, T alternate)
{
    return source.Where(predicate)
                 .FirstOr(alternate);
}
  • Another way of doing it can be: public static int IndexOf<T>(this IEnumerable<T> list, T item) { int e = list.Select((x, index) => EqualityComparer<T>.Default.Equals(item, x) ? x + 1 : -1) .FirstOrDefault(x => x > 0); return (e == 0) ? -1 : e - 1); } – Anu Thomas Chandy Mar 26 at 23:36

The best way to catch the position is by FindIndex This function is available only for List<>

Example

int id = listMyObject.FindIndex(x => x.Id == 15); 

If you have enumerator or array use this way

int id = myEnumerator.ToList().FindIndex(x => x.Id == 15); 

or

 int id = myArray.ToList().FindIndex(x => x.Id == 15); 

An alternative to finding the index after the fact is to wrap the Enumerable, somewhat similar to using the Linq GroupBy() method.

public static class IndexedEnumerable
{
    public static IndexedEnumerable<T> ToIndexed<T>(this IEnumerable<T> items)
    {
        return IndexedEnumerable<T>.Create(items);
    }
}

public class IndexedEnumerable<T> : IEnumerable<IndexedEnumerable<T>.IndexedItem>
{
    private readonly IEnumerable<IndexedItem> _items;

    public IndexedEnumerable(IEnumerable<IndexedItem> items)
    {
        _items = items;
    }

    public class IndexedItem
    {
        public IndexedItem(int index, T value)
        {
            Index = index;
            Value = value;
        }

        public T Value { get; private set; }
        public int Index { get; private set; }
    }

    public static IndexedEnumerable<T> Create(IEnumerable<T> items)
    {
        return new IndexedEnumerable<T>(items.Select((item, index) => new IndexedItem(index, item)));
    }

    public IEnumerator<IndexedItem> GetEnumerator()
    {
        return _items.GetEnumerator();
    }

    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return GetEnumerator();
    }
}

Which gives a use case of:

var items = new[] {1, 2, 3};
var indexedItems = items.ToIndexed();
foreach (var item in indexedItems)
{
    Console.WriteLine("items[{0}] = {1}", item.Index, item.Value);
}
  • great baseline. It is helpful to add members IsEven, IsOdd, IsFirst and IsLast as well. – JJS May 18 '17 at 20:34

Stumbled across this today in a search for answers and I thought I'd add my version to the list (No pun intended). It utlises the null conditional operator of c#6.0

IEnumerable<Item> collection = GetTheCollection();

var index = collection
.Select((item,idx) => new { Item = item, Index = idx })
//or .FirstOrDefault(_ =>  _.Item.Prop == something)
.FirstOrDefault(_ => _.Item == itemToFind)?.Index ?? -1;

I've done some 'racing of the old horses' (testing) and for large collections (~100,000), worst case scenario that item you want is at the end, this is 2x faster than doing ToList().FindIndex(). If the Item you want is in the middle its ~4x faster.

For smaller collections (~10,000) it seems to be only marginally faster

Heres how I tested it https://gist.github.com/insulind/16310945247fcf13ba186a45734f254e

This can get really cool with an extension (functioning as a proxy), for example:

collection.SelectWithIndex(); 
// vs. 
collection.Select((item, index) => item);

Which will automagically assign indexes to the collection accessible via this Index property.

Interface:

public interface IIndexable
{
    int Index { get; set; }
}

Custom extension (probably most useful for working with EF and DbContext):

public static class EnumerableXtensions
{
    public static IEnumerable<TModel> SelectWithIndex<TModel>(
        this IEnumerable<TModel> collection) where TModel : class, IIndexable
    {
        return collection.Select((item, index) =>
        {
            item.Index = index;
            return item;
        });
    }
}

public class SomeModelDTO : IIndexable
{
    public Guid Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public decimal Price { get; set; }

    public int Index { get; set; }
}

// In a method
var items = from a in db.SomeTable
            where a.Id == someValue
            select new SomeModelDTO
            {
                Id = a.Id,
                Name = a.Name,
                Price = a.Price
            };

return items.SelectWithIndex()
            .OrderBy(m => m.Name)
            .Skip(pageStart)
            .Take(pageSize)
            .ToList();

protected by Tats_innit Apr 1 '14 at 23:16

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