What are the conventions for this?

I use the folowing style, but not sure it is the preferred one since if I miss a dot at the end I can run into a lot of issue without realising that.

query = reservations_scope.for_company(current_company).joins{property.development}.
  group{property.development.id}.
  group{property.development.name}.
  group{property.number}.
  group{created_at}.
  group{price}.
  group{reservation_path}.
  group{company_id}.
  group{user_id}.
  group{fee_paid_date}.
  group{contract_exchanged_date}.
  group{deposit_paid_date}.
  group{cancelled_date}.
  select_with_reserving_agent_name_for(current_company, [
                                       "developments.id as dev_id",
                                       "developments.name as dev_name",
                                       "properties.number as prop_number",
                                       "reservations.created_at",
                                       "reservations.price",
                                       "reservations.fee_paid_date",
                                       "reservations.contract_exchanged_date",
                                       "reservations.deposit_paid_date",
                                       "reservations.cancelled_date"
  ]).reorder("developments.name")
query.to_a # ....

So what are the conventions for chaining methods over multiple lines and which one should I prefer?

NOTE: I couldn't find a good example from the Ruby coding style guide.

up vote 44 down vote accepted

There is actually a section on that in the Ruby style guide:

Adopt a consistent multi-line method chaining style. There are two popular styles in the Ruby community, both of which are considered good - leading . (Option A) and trailing . (Option B).

  • (Option A) When continuing a chained method invocation on another line keep the . on the second line.

    # bad - need to consult first line to understand second line
    one.two.three.
      four
    
    # good - it's immediately clear what's going on the second line
    one.two.three
      .four
    
  • (Option B) When continuing a chained method invocation on another line, include the . on the first line to indicate that the expression continues.

    # bad - need to read ahead to the second line to know that the chain continues
    one.two.three
      .four
    
    # good - it's immediately clear that the expression continues beyond the first line
    one.two.three.
      four
    

A discussion on the merits of both alternative styles can be found here.

  • They must have updated it. I don't remember seeing that. Thanks. – Dmytrii Nagirniak May 29 '13 at 3:11
  • 1
    @Bozhidar-Batsov, is there a rubocop setting for this one? – justingordon Apr 9 '15 at 2:58

In Ruby 1.9+ it's possible to write like this:

query = reservations_scope
  .for_company(current_company)
  .joins{property.development}
  .group{property.development.id}
  .group{property.development.name}
  .group{property.number}
  .group{created_at}
  .group{price}
  .group{reservation_path}
  .group{company_id}
  .group{user_id}

Much more readable, I think.

  • Nice, I didn't know about that! – Michael Pearson Oct 16 '12 at 1:06
  • I opted out of "dots in the beginning" for some reason. Don't remember why, but I guess there were some ambiguities. – Dmytrii Nagirniak Oct 16 '12 at 1:10
  • 2
    In ruby 1.8 I think you need to put the dots at the end of the line, otherwise it won't parse. So if your code needs to be run on ruby 1.8.x, you will need to put the dots at the end... – Aaron Qian Jul 28 '13 at 5:06

Here is a complete list of pros and cons of four options. Two of the options have not been mentioned in any other answer.

Pros and cons can be broken into unique ones and shared ones. Shared pros are the inverses of a unique con of another option. Similarly, shared cons are the inverses of a unique pro of another option. There are also some points that are pros for two options and cons for the other two.

To avoid repeating explanations, I describe each option’s shared pros and cons with just a summary of that point. Full details about a shared pro or con are available in the description of their inverse con or pro in another option’s unique section. For the points that are pros of two options and cons of the other two, I arbitrarily chose to put the full explanations in the set that starts with “. at line beginning”.

For a shorter list that leaves the shared pros and cons implicit instead of repeating them, see this old version of this answer.


. at line end

items.get.lazy.
  take(10).
  force

Pros

Shared with only one other option:
  • Continuing lines can be commented out freely, and comments can be added between lines
  • Pastable into IRB/Pry
  • Supported in Ruby 1.8
Shared with two other options:
  • When you read the initial line, it is clear that the expression continues
  • Plenty of horizontal space for continuing lines
  • Doesn’t require manual alignment of characters into columns
  • Looks fine when viewed in a proportional font
  • Has a minimum of punctuation, reducing typing and visual noise

Cons

Unique:
  • Continuing lines look strange on their own. You must read the preceding line to understand that they are a continuation.
    • Indentation is not a reliable indicator that a line continues from the previous line – it could merely mean the start of a block.
Shared with only one other option:
  • When editing the code, it is harder to comment out or reorder the last line

. at line beginning

items.get.lazy
  .take(10)
  .force

Pros

Shared with only one other option:
  • When editing the code, it is easier to comment out or change the order of the last line – no need to delete and add . or \.
Shared with two other options:
  • Continuing lines can be understood when seen on their own
  • Plenty of horizontal space for continuing lines
  • Doesn’t require manual alignment of characters into columns
  • Looks fine when viewed in a proportional font
  • Has a minimum of punctuation, reducing typing and visual noise

Cons

Unique:
  • When you read the initial line, it’s not immediately clear that the expression continues
    • If you use this in your codebase, then when you read a line, you must always check the line after to make sure that it doesn’t affect the initial line’s meaning.
Shared with only one other option:
  • The code silently breaks if you # comment out a continuing line, or add a comment between lines
  • You can’t paste this code into IRB/Pry without it being misinterpreted
  • Not supported in Ruby 1.8 and below

. at line beginning, indented to the previous .

items.get.lazy
         .take(10)
         .force

Pros

Shared with only one other option:
  • When editing the code, it is easier to comment out or change the order of the last line – no need to delete and add . or \.
Shared with two other options:
  • When you read the initial line, it is clear that the expression continues
  • Continuing lines can be understood when seen on their own
  • Has a minimum of punctuation, reducing typing and visual noise

Cons

Unique:
  • Each line’s code must fit into less horizontal space
  • Requires manual alignment of the .s into columns
    • It is easier if you have an editor plugin for aligning text, but still more work than using default indentation rules.
    • Even if your editing setup includes a plugin for alignment, your coworkers’ setups may not.
  • The code will look misaligned when viewed in a proportional font
Shared with only one other option:
  • The code silently breaks if you # comment out a continuing line, or add a comment between lines
  • You can’t paste this code into IRB/Pry without it being misinterpreted
  • Not supported in Ruby 1.8 and below
Shared with two other options:
  • When editing the code, it is harder to comment out or reorder the last line

\ at line end, . at next line’s beginning

items.get.lazy \
  .take(10) \
  .force

Pros

Shared with only one other option:
  • Continuing lines can be commented out freely, and comments can be added between lines
  • Pastable into IRB/Pry
  • Supported in Ruby 1.8
Shared with two other options:
  • When you read the initial line, it is clear that the expression continues
  • Continuing lines can be understood when seen on their own
  • Plenty of horizontal space for continuing lines
  • Doesn’t require manual alignment of characters into columns
  • Looks fine when viewed in a proportional font

Cons

Unique:
  • Requires more typing
  • Creates more visual noise
Shared with only one other option:
  • When editing the code, it is harder to comment out or reorder the last line
  • 1
    > Unique pros: (none – all pros are shared with another option) Doesn't make sense. If the pro is shared, then it is not unique for any, but since not all have the same pros, without listing all pros explicitly it is unclear which apply to which when Unique pros: (none...) is all we are given. If what you meant was "All pros listed for any other option are also true here", that is similar to, but not logically equivalent to "Unique pros: (none – all pros are shared with another option)" – Peter H. Boling Apr 29 '16 at 7:36
  • @PeterH.Boling When I write that there are no unique pros, the shared pros I’m referring to are the inverses of the cons of all other options. For example, the inverse of “con: not supported in Ruby 1.8”, which applies to the option “. at line beginning”, is “pro: supported in Ruby 1.8”, which applies to every other top-level option. I didn’t write out those implied pros because they would double the length and apparent complexity of this list while just duplicating information. – Rory O'Kane Sep 13 '16 at 3:07
  • This is an important answer though. I got here from links via the "official Ruby Style Guide", so I think it makes sense to err on the side of clarity. I use this post to try to win arguments about dot placement, and verbosity may be warranted. 'No unique pros because they are all shared" still doesn't make logical sense. Your understanding of it as a reflection of "cons" is not self-evident. Ref: github.com/bbatsov/ruby-style-guide/pull/176 – Peter H. Boling Sep 22 '16 at 20:58
  • 1
    @PeterH.Boling To avoid confusion, I changed the format to repeat the shared pros and cons for every option. I hope people find this format easier to compare options with. – Rory O'Kane Apr 29 at 4:29

The reason why I choose the dot in the end of the line is that it will allow you to paste code in an IRB session. Also, you can't comment lines in the middle of the multi-line code if you use the dots in the beginning of the lines. Here's a good discussion to read: https://github.com/bbatsov/ruby-style-guide/pull/176

  • 2
    True with the interleaved comment lines. It would be great if one could do that and still use the dot-at-the-beginning syntax. – Cristian Mar 31 '15 at 7:46

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