238

What's the simplest (and hopefully not too slow) way to calculate the median with MySQL? I've used AVG(x) for finding the mean, but I'm having a hard time finding a simple way of calculating the median. For now, I'm returning all the rows to PHP, doing a sort, and then picking the middle row, but surely there must be some simple way of doing it in a single MySQL query.

Example data:

id | val
--------
 1    4
 2    7
 3    2
 4    2
 5    9
 6    8
 7    3

Sorting on val gives 2 2 3 4 7 8 9, so the median should be 4, versus SELECT AVG(val) which == 5.

1

47 Answers 47

253

In MariaDB / MySQL:

SELECT AVG(dd.val) as median_val
FROM (
SELECT d.val, @rownum:=@rownum+1 as `row_number`, @total_rows:=@rownum
  FROM data d, (SELECT @rownum:=0) r
  WHERE d.val is NOT NULL
  -- put some where clause here
  ORDER BY d.val
) as dd
WHERE dd.row_number IN ( FLOOR((@total_rows+1)/2), FLOOR((@total_rows+2)/2) );

Steve Cohen points out, that after the first pass, @rownum will contain the total number of rows. This can be used to determine the median, so no second pass or join is needed.

Also AVG(dd.val) and dd.row_number IN(...) is used to correctly produce a median when there are an even number of records. Reasoning:

SELECT FLOOR((3+1)/2),FLOOR((3+2)/2); -- when total_rows is 3, avg rows 2 and 2
SELECT FLOOR((4+1)/2),FLOOR((4+2)/2); -- when total_rows is 4, avg rows 2 and 3

Finally, MariaDB 10.3.3+ contains a MEDIAN function

9
  • 4
    any way to make it to show group values? like: place / median for that place... like select place, median_value from table... any way? thanks
    – saulob
    Jan 18, 2014 at 4:45
  • 2
    @rowNum will have the 'total count' at the end of the execution. So you can use that if you want to avoid having to do a 'count all' again (which was my case because my query wasn't so simple)
    – Ahmed-Anas
    Oct 15, 2016 at 12:33
  • The logic of having one statement: ( floor((total_rows+1)/2), floor((total_rows+2)/2) ) calculate the rows needed for the median is awesome! Not sure how you thought of that, but it is brilliant. The part I don't follow is the (SELECT @rownum:=0) r -- what purpose does this serve? Jun 1, 2017 at 16:40
  • 1
    My value came from a two-table join, so I had to add another subquery in order to make sure the row ordering was correct after the join! The structure was sort of select avg(value) from (select value, row_number from (select a - b as value from a_table join b_table order by value)) Jul 11, 2019 at 3:04
  • 1
    I know this is very old but for some reason this produces very different results than just moving set @rn:=-1 to the outer select instead of instantiating at 0 inside the inner select. For some reason I could not get the results to match
    – davzaman
    Nov 5, 2019 at 6:44
71

I just found another answer online in the comments:

For medians in almost any SQL:

SELECT x.val from data x, data y
GROUP BY x.val
HAVING SUM(SIGN(1-SIGN(y.val-x.val))) = (COUNT(*)+1)/2

Make sure your columns are well indexed and the index is used for filtering and sorting. Verify with the explain plans.

select count(*) from table --find the number of rows

Calculate the "median" row number. Maybe use: median_row = floor(count / 2).

Then pick it out of the list:

select val from table order by val asc limit median_row,1

This should return you one row with just the value you want.

4
  • 6
    @rob can you help edit please? Or should I just bow down to the velcrow solution? (not actually sure how to defer to another solution) Thanks, Jacob Jun 18, 2012 at 23:50
  • 1
    Note that it does a "cross join", which is very slow for large tables.
    – Rick James
    Feb 1, 2016 at 0:53
  • 2
    This answer returns nothing for even number of rows.
    – kuttumiah
    Aug 16, 2018 at 19:51
  • This answer doesn't work at all for some data sets, e.g., the trivial data set with values 0.1, 0.1, 0.1, 2 -- it will work if all the values are distinct, but only works if the values
    – Kem Mason
    Jan 9, 2019 at 19:41
35

I found the accepted solution didn't work on my MySQL install, returning an empty set, but this query worked for me in all situations that I tested it on:

SELECT x.val from data x, data y
GROUP BY x.val
HAVING SUM(SIGN(1-SIGN(y.val-x.val)))/COUNT(*) > .5
LIMIT 1
8
  • 1
    absolutely correct, works perfectly and very speedy on my indexed tables
    – Rob
    Jun 13, 2012 at 13:49
  • 2
    this seems to be the fastest solution on mysql out of all the answers here, 200ms with just short of a million records in the table
    – Rob
    Jun 13, 2012 at 14:01
  • 3
    @FrankConijn: It selects from one table twice. The table's name is data and it is being used with two names, x and y.
    – Brian
    Jun 26, 2014 at 21:24
  • 3
    just saying i stalled my mysqld with this exact query on a table with 33k rows...
    – Xenonite
    Feb 4, 2016 at 9:40
  • 3
    This query returns wrong answer for even number of rows.
    – kuttumiah
    Aug 16, 2018 at 19:43
28

Unfortunately, neither TheJacobTaylor's nor velcrow's answers return accurate results for current versions of MySQL.

Velcro's answer from above is close, but it does not calculate correctly for result sets with an even number of rows. Medians are defined as either 1) the middle number on odd numbered sets, or 2) the average of the two middle numbers on even number sets.

So, here's velcro's solution patched to handle both odd and even number sets:

SELECT AVG(middle_values) AS 'median' FROM (
  SELECT t1.median_column AS 'middle_values' FROM
    (
      SELECT @row:=@row+1 as `row`, x.median_column
      FROM median_table AS x, (SELECT @row:=0) AS r
      WHERE 1
      -- put some where clause here
      ORDER BY x.median_column
    ) AS t1,
    (
      SELECT COUNT(*) as 'count'
      FROM median_table x
      WHERE 1
      -- put same where clause here
    ) AS t2
    -- the following condition will return 1 record for odd number sets, or 2 records for even number sets.
    WHERE t1.row >= t2.count/2 and t1.row <= ((t2.count/2) +1)) AS t3;

To use this, follow these 3 easy steps:

  1. Replace "median_table" (2 occurrences) in the above code with the name of your table
  2. Replace "median_column" (3 occurrences) with the column name you'd like to find a median for
  3. If you have a WHERE condition, replace "WHERE 1" (2 occurrences) with your where condition
1
  • And, what do you do for the Median of string values?
    – Rick James
    Jan 17, 2020 at 23:30
13

I propose a faster way.

Get the row count:

SELECT CEIL(COUNT(*)/2) FROM data;

Then take the middle value in a sorted subquery:

SELECT max(val) FROM (SELECT val FROM data ORDER BY val limit @middlevalue) x;

I tested this with a 5x10e6 dataset of random numbers and it will find the median in under 10 seconds.

7
  • 3
    Why not: SELECT val FROM data ORDER BY val limit @middlevalue, 1
    – Bryan
    Jul 13, 2011 at 0:57
  • 1
    How do you pull the variable output of your first code block into your second code block?
    – Trip
    Dec 20, 2012 at 22:55
  • 3
    As in, where does @middlevalue come from?
    – Trip
    Dec 20, 2012 at 23:01
  • @Bryan - I agree with you, that makes much more sense to me. Did you ever find a reason not to do it that way?
    – Shane N
    Feb 24, 2014 at 19:45
  • 9
    This does not work as a variable cannot be used in limit clause.
    – codepk
    Jun 28, 2017 at 5:41
12

Install and use this mysql statistical functions: http://www.xarg.org/2012/07/statistical-functions-in-mysql/

After that, calculate median is easy:

SELECT median(val) FROM data;
1
  • 1
    I just tried this myself, and for what it's worth, installing it was super fast / easy, and it worked as advertised, including grouping, e.g. "select name, median(x) FROM t1 group by name" -- github source here: github.com/infusion/udf_infusion
    – Kem Mason
    Jan 11, 2019 at 19:11
8

A comment on this page in the MySQL documentation has the following suggestion:

-- (mostly) High Performance scaling MEDIAN function per group
-- Median defined in http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Median
--
-- by Peter Hlavac
-- 06.11.2008
--
-- Example Table:

DROP table if exists table_median;
CREATE TABLE table_median (id INTEGER(11),val INTEGER(11));
COMMIT;


INSERT INTO table_median (id, val) VALUES
(1, 7), (1, 4), (1, 5), (1, 1), (1, 8), (1, 3), (1, 6),
(2, 4),
(3, 5), (3, 2),
(4, 5), (4, 12), (4, 1), (4, 7);



-- Calculating the MEDIAN
SELECT @a := 0;
SELECT
id,
AVG(val) AS MEDIAN
FROM (
SELECT
id,
val
FROM (
SELECT
-- Create an index n for every id
@a := (@a + 1) mod o.c AS shifted_n,
IF(@a mod o.c=0, o.c, @a) AS n,
o.id,
o.val,
-- the number of elements for every id
o.c
FROM (
SELECT
t_o.id,
val,
c
FROM
table_median t_o INNER JOIN
(SELECT
id,
COUNT(1) AS c
FROM
table_median
GROUP BY
id
) t2
ON (t2.id = t_o.id)
ORDER BY
t_o.id,val
) o
) a
WHERE
IF(
-- if there is an even number of elements
-- take the lower and the upper median
-- and use AVG(lower,upper)
c MOD 2 = 0,
n = c DIV 2 OR n = (c DIV 2)+1,

-- if its an odd number of elements
-- take the first if its only one element
-- or take the one in the middle
IF(
c = 1,
n = 1,
n = c DIV 2 + 1
)
)
) a
GROUP BY
id;

-- Explanation:
-- The Statement creates a helper table like
--
-- n id val count
-- ----------------
-- 1, 1, 1, 7
-- 2, 1, 3, 7
-- 3, 1, 4, 7
-- 4, 1, 5, 7
-- 5, 1, 6, 7
-- 6, 1, 7, 7
-- 7, 1, 8, 7
--
-- 1, 2, 4, 1

-- 1, 3, 2, 2
-- 2, 3, 5, 2
--
-- 1, 4, 1, 4
-- 2, 4, 5, 4
-- 3, 4, 7, 4
-- 4, 4, 12, 4


-- from there we can select the n-th element on the position: count div 2 + 1 
2
  • IMHO, this one is clearly the best for situations where you need the median from a complicated subset(s) (I needed to calculate separate medians of a large number of data subsets) Mar 19, 2012 at 20:57
  • Works fine for me. 5.6.14 MySQL Community Server. Table with 11M records (about 20Gb on disk), has two not primary indexes (model_id, price). In table (after filtration) we have 500K records to calculate median for. In result we have 30K records (model_id, median_price). Query duration is 1.5-2 seconds. Speed is Fast for me.
    – Mikl
    Jul 3, 2014 at 17:57
7

I have this below code which I found on HackerRank and it is pretty simple and works in each and every case.

SELECT M.MEDIAN_COL FROM MEDIAN_TABLE M WHERE  
  (SELECT COUNT(MEDIAN_COL) FROM MEDIAN_TABLE WHERE MEDIAN_COL < M.MEDIAN_COL ) = 
  (SELECT COUNT(MEDIAN_COL) FROM MEDIAN_TABLE WHERE MEDIAN_COL > M.MEDIAN_COL );
2
  • 4
    I believe this only works with a table that has the number of entries is odd. For even number of entries, this may have a problem.
    – Y. Chang
    Aug 14, 2018 at 20:22
  • @Y.Chang you are right. This returns nothing for even number of rows
    – Ma'ruf
    Dec 14, 2020 at 12:48
6

If MySQL has ROW_NUMBER, then the MEDIAN is (be inspired by this SQL Server query):

WITH Numbered AS 
(
SELECT *, COUNT(*) OVER () AS Cnt,
    ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY val) AS RowNum
FROM yourtable
)
SELECT id, val
FROM Numbered
WHERE RowNum IN ((Cnt+1)/2, (Cnt+2)/2)
;

The IN is used in case you have an even number of entries.

If you want to find the median per group, then just PARTITION BY group in your OVER clauses.

Rob

2
  • 1
    Nope, no ROW_NUMBER OVER, no PARTITION BY, none of that; this is MySql, not a real DB engine like PostgreSQL, IBM DB2, MS SQL Server, and so forth;-). Aug 20, 2009 at 17:44
  • 1
    MySQL has window functions now, so this basically works. The only change you need is that you have to take the average of your results in the end.
    – GuyStalks
    Aug 7, 2020 at 20:05
6

Most of the solutions above work only for one field of the table, you might need to get the median (50th percentile) for many fields on the query.

I use this:

SELECT CAST(SUBSTRING_INDEX(SUBSTRING_INDEX(
 GROUP_CONCAT(field_name ORDER BY field_name SEPARATOR ','),
  ',', 50/100 * COUNT(*) + 1), ',', -1) AS DECIMAL) AS `Median`
FROM table_name;

You can replace the "50" in example above to any percentile, is very efficient.

Just make sure you have enough memory for the GROUP_CONCAT, you can change it with:

SET group_concat_max_len = 10485760; #10MB max length

More details: http://web.performancerasta.com/metrics-tips-calculating-95th-99th-or-any-percentile-with-single-mysql-query/

1
  • Be aware: For even number of values it takes the higher of the two middle values. For odds number of values it takes the next higher value after the median.
    – giordano
    Sep 24, 2013 at 6:43
4

You could use the user-defined function that's found here.

2
  • 3
    This looks the most useful, but I don't want to install unstable alpha software that may cause mysql to crash onto my production server :(
    – davr
    Aug 20, 2009 at 17:40
  • 6
    So study their sources for the function of interest, fix them or modify them as needed, and install "your own" stable and non-alpha version once you've made it -- how's that any worse than similarly tweaking less-proven code suggestions you get on SO?-) Aug 20, 2009 at 17:42
4

Building off of velcro's answer, for those of you having to do a median off of something that is grouped by another parameter:

SELECT grp_field, t1.val FROM (
   SELECT grp_field, @rownum:=IF(@s = grp_field, @rownum + 1, 0) AS row_number,
   @s:=IF(@s = grp_field, @s, grp_field) AS sec, d.val
  FROM data d,  (SELECT @rownum:=0, @s:=0) r
  ORDER BY grp_field, d.val
) as t1 JOIN (
  SELECT grp_field, count(*) as total_rows
  FROM data d
  GROUP BY grp_field
) as t2
ON t1.grp_field = t2.grp_field
WHERE t1.row_number=floor(total_rows/2)+1;

0
3

Takes care about an odd value count - gives the avg of the two values in the middle in that case.

SELECT AVG(val) FROM
  ( SELECT x.id, x.val from data x, data y
      GROUP BY x.id, x.val
      HAVING SUM(SIGN(1-SIGN(IF(y.val-x.val=0 AND x.id != y.id, SIGN(x.id-y.id), y.val-x.val)))) IN (ROUND((COUNT(*))/2), ROUND((COUNT(*)+1)/2))
  ) sq
3

My code, efficient without tables or additional variables:

SELECT
((SUBSTRING_INDEX(SUBSTRING_INDEX(group_concat(val order by val), ',', floor(1+((count(val)-1) / 2))), ',', -1))
+
(SUBSTRING_INDEX(SUBSTRING_INDEX(group_concat(val order by val), ',', ceiling(1+((count(val)-1) / 2))), ',', -1)))/2
as median
FROM table;
1
  • 4
    This will fail on any substantial amount of data because GROUP_CONCAT is limited to 1023 characters, even when used inside another function like this. Jun 7, 2013 at 23:43
3

Single query to archive the perfect median:

SELECT 
COUNT(*) as total_rows, 
IF(count(*)%2 = 1, CAST(SUBSTRING_INDEX(SUBSTRING_INDEX( GROUP_CONCAT(val ORDER BY val SEPARATOR ','), ',', 50/100 * COUNT(*)), ',', -1) AS DECIMAL), ROUND((CAST(SUBSTRING_INDEX(SUBSTRING_INDEX( GROUP_CONCAT(val ORDER BY val SEPARATOR ','), ',', 50/100 * COUNT(*) + 1), ',', -1) AS DECIMAL) + CAST(SUBSTRING_INDEX(SUBSTRING_INDEX( GROUP_CONCAT(val ORDER BY val SEPARATOR ','), ',', 50/100 * COUNT(*)), ',', -1) AS DECIMAL)) / 2)) as median, 
AVG(val) as average 
FROM 
data
2

Optionally, you could also do this in a stored procedure:

DROP PROCEDURE IF EXISTS median;
DELIMITER //
CREATE PROCEDURE median (table_name VARCHAR(255), column_name VARCHAR(255), where_clause VARCHAR(255))
BEGIN
  -- Set default parameters
  IF where_clause IS NULL OR where_clause = '' THEN
    SET where_clause = 1;
  END IF;

  -- Prepare statement
  SET @sql = CONCAT(
    "SELECT AVG(middle_values) AS 'median' FROM (
      SELECT t1.", column_name, " AS 'middle_values' FROM
        (
          SELECT @row:=@row+1 as `row`, x.", column_name, "
          FROM ", table_name," AS x, (SELECT @row:=0) AS r
          WHERE ", where_clause, " ORDER BY x.", column_name, "
        ) AS t1,
        (
          SELECT COUNT(*) as 'count'
          FROM ", table_name, " x
          WHERE ", where_clause, "
        ) AS t2
        -- the following condition will return 1 record for odd number sets, or 2 records for even number sets.
        WHERE t1.row >= t2.count/2
          AND t1.row <= ((t2.count/2)+1)) AS t3
    ");

  -- Execute statement
  PREPARE stmt FROM @sql;
  EXECUTE stmt;
END//
DELIMITER ;


-- Sample usage:
-- median(table_name, column_name, where_condition);
CALL median('products', 'price', NULL);
3
  • Thanks for this! The user should be aware that missing values (NULL) are considered as values. to avoid this problem add 'x IS NOT NULL where condition.
    – giordano
    Sep 24, 2013 at 7:32
  • 1
    @giordano In which line of the code x IS NOT NULL should be added? May 13, 2015 at 7:43
  • 1
    @PrzemyslawRemin Sorry, I was not clear in my statement and I realized now that the SP does already consider the case of missing values. The SP should be called in this way: CALL median("table","x","x IS NOT NULL").
    – giordano
    May 14, 2015 at 13:28
2

My solution presented below works in just one query without creation of table, variable or even sub-query. Plus, it allows you to get median for each group in group-by queries (this is what i needed !):

SELECT `columnA`, 
SUBSTRING_INDEX(SUBSTRING_INDEX(GROUP_CONCAT(`columnB` ORDER BY `columnB`), ',', CEILING((COUNT(`columnB`)/2))), ',', -1) medianOfColumnB
FROM `tableC`
-- some where clause if you want
GROUP BY `columnA`;

It works because of a smart use of group_concat and substring_index.

But, to allow big group_concat, you have to set group_concat_max_len to a higher value (1024 char by default). You can set it like that (for current sql session) :

SET SESSION group_concat_max_len = 10000; 
-- up to 4294967295 in 32-bits platform.

More infos for group_concat_max_len: https://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/server-system-variables.html#sysvar_group_concat_max_len

0
2

Another riff on Velcrow's answer, but uses a single intermediate table and takes advantage of the variable used for row numbering to get the count, rather than performing an extra query to calculate it. Also starts the count so that the first row is row 0 to allow simply using Floor and Ceil to select the median row(s).

SELECT Avg(tmp.val) as median_val
    FROM (SELECT inTab.val, @rows := @rows + 1 as rowNum
              FROM data as inTab,  (SELECT @rows := -1) as init
              -- Replace with better where clause or delete
              WHERE 2 > 1
              ORDER BY inTab.val) as tmp
    WHERE tmp.rowNum in (Floor(@rows / 2), Ceil(@rows / 2));
2

Knowing exact row count you can use this query:

SELECT <value> AS VAL FROM <table> ORDER BY VAL LIMIT 1 OFFSET <half>

Where <half> = ceiling(<size> / 2.0) - 1

2
SELECT 
    SUBSTRING_INDEX(
        SUBSTRING_INDEX(
            GROUP_CONCAT(field ORDER BY field),
            ',',
            ((
                ROUND(
                    LENGTH(GROUP_CONCAT(field)) - 
                    LENGTH(
                        REPLACE(
                            GROUP_CONCAT(field),
                            ',',
                            ''
                        )
                    )
                ) / 2) + 1
            )),
            ',',
            -1
        )
FROM
    table

The above seems to work for me.

1
  • It is not returning the correct median for even number of values, For example , the median of {98,102,102,98} is 100 but your code gives 102. It worked fine for odd numbers.
    – Nomiluks
    Apr 28, 2017 at 10:36
1

I used a two query approach:

  • first one to get count, min, max and avg
  • second one (prepared statement) with a "LIMIT @count/2, 1" and "ORDER BY .." clauses to get the median value

These are wrapped in a function defn, so all values can be returned from one call.

If your ranges are static and your data does not change often, it might be more efficient to precompute/store these values and use the stored values instead of querying from scratch every time.

1

as i just needed a median AND percentile solution, I made a simple and quite flexible function based on the findings in this thread. I know that I am happy myself if I find "readymade" functions that are easy to include in my projects, so I decided to quickly share:

function mysql_percentile($table, $column, $where, $percentile = 0.5) {

    $sql = "
            SELECT `t1`.`".$column."` as `percentile` FROM (
            SELECT @rownum:=@rownum+1 as `row_number`, `d`.`".$column."`
              FROM `".$table."` `d`,  (SELECT @rownum:=0) `r`
              ".$where."
              ORDER BY `d`.`".$column."`
            ) as `t1`, 
            (
              SELECT count(*) as `total_rows`
              FROM `".$table."` `d`
              ".$where."
            ) as `t2`
            WHERE 1
            AND `t1`.`row_number`=floor(`total_rows` * ".$percentile.")+1;
        ";

    $result = sql($sql, 1);

    if (!empty($result)) {
        return $result['percentile'];       
    } else {
        return 0;
    }

}

Usage is very easy, example from my current project:

...
$table = DBPRE."zip_".$slug;
$column = 'seconds';
$where = "WHERE `reached` = '1' AND `time` >= '".$start_time."'";

    $reaching['median'] = mysql_percentile($table, $column, $where, 0.5);
    $reaching['percentile25'] = mysql_percentile($table, $column, $where, 0.25);
    $reaching['percentile75'] = mysql_percentile($table, $column, $where, 0.75);
...
1

Here is my way . Of course, you could put it into a procedure :-)

SET @median_counter = (SELECT FLOOR(COUNT(*)/2) - 1 AS `median_counter` FROM `data`);

SET @median = CONCAT('SELECT `val` FROM `data` ORDER BY `val` LIMIT ', @median_counter, ', 1');

PREPARE median FROM @median;

EXECUTE median;

You could avoid the variable @median_counter, if you substitude it:

SET @median = CONCAT( 'SELECT `val` FROM `data` ORDER BY `val` LIMIT ',
                      (SELECT FLOOR(COUNT(*)/2) - 1 AS `median_counter` FROM `data`),
                      ', 1'
                    );

PREPARE median FROM @median;

EXECUTE median;
1

Based on @bob's answer, this generalizes the query to have the ability to return multiple medians, grouped by some criteria.

Think, e.g., median sale price for used cars in a car lot, grouped by year-month.

SELECT 
    period, 
    AVG(middle_values) AS 'median' 
FROM (
    SELECT t1.sale_price AS 'middle_values', t1.row_num, t1.period, t2.count
    FROM (
        SELECT 
            @last_period:=@period AS 'last_period',
            @period:=DATE_FORMAT(sale_date, '%Y-%m') AS 'period',
            IF (@period<>@last_period, @row:=1, @row:=@row+1) as `row_num`, 
            x.sale_price
          FROM listings AS x, (SELECT @row:=0) AS r
          WHERE 1
            -- where criteria goes here
          ORDER BY DATE_FORMAT(sale_date, '%Y%m'), x.sale_price
        ) AS t1
    LEFT JOIN (  
          SELECT COUNT(*) as 'count', DATE_FORMAT(sale_date, '%Y-%m') AS 'period'
          FROM listings x
          WHERE 1
            -- same where criteria goes here
          GROUP BY DATE_FORMAT(sale_date, '%Y%m')
        ) AS t2
        ON t1.period = t2.period
    ) AS t3
WHERE 
    row_num >= (count/2) 
    AND row_num <= ((count/2) + 1)
GROUP BY t3.period
ORDER BY t3.period;
1

Often, we may need to calculate Median not just for the whole table, but for aggregates with respect to our ID. In other words, calculate median for each ID in our table, where each ID has many records. (good performance and works in many SQL + fixes problem of even and odds, more about performance of different Median-methods https://sqlperformance.com/2012/08/t-sql-queries/median )

SELECT our_id, AVG(1.0 * our_val) as Median
FROM
( SELECT our_id, our_val, 
  COUNT(*) OVER (PARTITION BY our_id) AS cnt,
  ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY our_id ORDER BY our_val) AS rn
  FROM our_table
) AS x
WHERE rn IN ((cnt + 1)/2, (cnt + 2)/2) GROUP BY our_id;

Hope it helps

1
  • It is the best solution. However, for large data sets it will slow down because it re-counts for every item in each set. To make it faster put "COUNT(*)" to separate sub-query. Feb 28, 2018 at 16:42
1

MySQL has supported window functions since version 8.0, you can use ROW_NUMBER or DENSE_RANK (DO NOT use RANK as it assigns the same rank to same values, like in sports ranking):

SELECT AVG(t1.val) AS median_val
  FROM (SELECT val, 
               ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY val) AS rownum
          FROM data) t1,
       (SELECT COUNT(*) AS num_records FROM data) t2
 WHERE t1.row_num IN
       (FLOOR((t2.num_records + 1) / 2), 
        FLOOR((t2.num_records + 2) / 2));
1

A simple way to calculate Median in MySQL

set @ct := (select count(1) from station);
set @row := 0;

select avg(a.val) as median from 
(select * from  table order by val) a
where (select @row := @row + 1)
between @ct/2.0 and @ct/2.0 +1;
1

Simple Solution For ORACLE:

SELECT ROUND(MEDIAN(Lat_N), 4) FROM Station;

Easy Solution to Understand For MySQL:

select case MOD(count(lat_n),2) 
when 1 then (select round(S.LAT_N,4) from station S where (select count(Lat_N) from station where Lat_N < S.LAT_N ) = (select count(Lat_N) from station where Lat_N > S.LAT_N))
else (select round(AVG(S.LAT_N),4) from station S where 1 = (select count(Lat_N) from station where Lat_N < S.LAT_N ) - (select count(Lat_N) from station where Lat_N > S.LAT_N))
end from station;

Explanation

STATION is table name. LAT_N is the column name having numeric value

Suppose there are 101 records(odd number) in station table. This means that the median is 51st record if the tabled sorted either asc or desc.

In above query for every S.LAT_N of S table I am creating two tables. One for number of LAT_N values less than S.LAT_N and another for number of LAT_N values greater than S.LAT_N. Later I am comparing these two tables and if they are matched then I am selecting that S.LAT_N value. When I check for 51st records there are 50 values less than 51st record and there 50 records greater than 51st record. As you see, there are 50 records in both tables. So this is our answer. For every other record there are different number of records in two tables created for comparison. So, only 51st record meets the condition.

Now suppose there are 100 records(even number) in station table. This means that the median is average of 50th and 51st records if the tabled sorted either asc or desc.

Same as odd logic I am creating two tables. One for number of LAT_N values less than S.LAT_N and another for number of LAT_N values greater than S.LAT_N. Later I am comparing these two tables and if their difference is equal to 1 then I am selecting that S.LAT_N value and find the average. When I check for 50th records there are 49 values less than 50th record and there 51 records greater than 50th record. As you see, there is difference of 1 record in both tables. So this(50th record) is our 1st record for average. Similarly, When I check for 51st records there are 50 values less than 51st record and there 49 records greater than 51st record. As you see, there is difference of 1 record in both tables. So this(51st record) is our 2nd record for average. For every other record there are different number of records in two tables created for comparison. So, only 50th and 51st records meet the condition.

1

I am using the below table for the solution in MySQL:

CREATE TABLE transactions (
  transaction_id int , user_id int , merchant_name varchar(255), transaction_date date , amount int
);

INSERT INTO transactions (transaction_id, user_id, merchant_name, transaction_date, amount)  
VALUES (1, 1 ,'abc', '2015-08-17', 100),(2, 2, 'ced', '2015-2-17', 100),(3, 1, 'def', '2015-2-16', 121),
(4, 1 ,'ced', '2015-3-17', 110),(5, 1, 'ced', '2015-3-17', 150),(6, 2 ,'abc', '2015-4-17', 130), 
(7, 3 ,'ced', '2015-12-17', 10),(8, 3 ,'abc', '2015-8-17', 100),(9, 2 ,'abc', '2015-12-17', 140),(10, 1,'abc', '2015-9-17', 100),
(11, 1 ,'abc', '2015-08-17', 121),(12, 2 ,'ced', '2015-12-23', 130),(13, 1 ,'def', '2015-12-23', 13),(3, 4, 'abc', '2015-2-16', 120),(3, 4, 'def', '2015-2-16', 121),(3, 4, 'ced', '2015-2-16', 121);

Calculating Median for 'amount' column:

WITH Numbered AS 
(
SELECT *, COUNT(*) OVER () AS TotatRecords,
    ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY amount) AS RowNum
FROM transactions
)
SELECT Avg(amount)
FROM Numbered
WHERE RowNum IN ( FLOOR((TotatRecords+1)/2), FLOOR((TotatRecords+2)/2) )
;

TotalRecords = 16 and Median = 120.5000

This query will work for both the conditions i.e. Even and Odd records.

0

After reading all previous ones they didn't match with my actual requirement so I implemented my own one which doesn't need any procedure or complicate statements, just I GROUP_CONCAT all values from the column I wanted to obtain the MEDIAN and applying a COUNT DIV BY 2 I extract the value in from the middle of the list like the following query does :

(POS is the name of the column I want to get its median)

(query) SELECT
SUBSTRING_INDEX ( 
   SUBSTRING_INDEX ( 
       GROUP_CONCAT(pos ORDER BY CAST(pos AS SIGNED INTEGER) desc SEPARATOR ';') 
    , ';', COUNT(*)/2 ) 
, ';', -1 ) AS `pos_med`
FROM table_name
GROUP BY any_criterial

I hope this could be useful for someone in the way many of other comments were for me from this website.

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