I am using an img tag of HTML to show a photo in our application. I have set both its height and width attribute to 64. I need to show any image resolution (e.g. 256x256, 1024x768, 500x400, 205x246, etc.) as 64x64. But by setting the height and width attributes of an img tag to 64, it's not maintaining the aspect ratio, so the image looks distorted.

For your reference my exact code is:

<img src="Runtime Path to photo" border="1" height="64" width="64">
  • possible duplicate of HTML/IE: stretch image to fit, preserve aspect ratio – Jonathon Reinhart Feb 19 '15 at 5:37
  • Chridam, It's long time when I asked this question. I have left that company where I was working for this issue. I could not try the suggested solutions because I was working on other priorities to meet deadlines that time. I could not get chance to make further progress on it. – sunil kumar Jul 22 '15 at 8:38

Don't set height AND width. Use one or the other and the correct aspect ratio will be maintained.

.widthSet {
    max-width: 100px;
}

.heightSet {
    max-height: 100px;
}
<img src="http://placehold.it/200x250" />

<img src="http://placehold.it/200x250" width="64" />

<img src="http://placehold.it/200x250" height="64" />

<img src="http://placehold.it/200x250" class="widthSet" />

<img src="http://placehold.it/200x250" class="heightSet" />

  • The images on the fiddle are broken. – theblang Nov 9 '15 at 23:07
  • 6
    ... but what if you want to fix both height and width? – fatuhoku Sep 7 '16 at 15:41
  • 1
    This makes no sense for dynamic applications. It is not known whether width or height will be at 64px, as it depends on the ratio of the image. Why is this the upvoted response? – Mär Jul 31 at 8:45
  • 1
    The size is fixed, the aspect ratio is not, as the question was specifically about any image of any resolution. Including resolutions smaller than 64x64. – Mär Jul 31 at 8:50
  • 1
    Lol, @Turnip. This solution doesn't work in all cases. There are cases where I just set the width or height and the resulting image is distorted. I definitely would like a better (or more complete response) whether here or somewhere else (not saying your answer is bad) – Otto Aug 16 at 20:08

here is the sample one

div{
   width: 200px;
   height:200px;
   border:solid
 }

img{
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
    object-fit: contain;
    }
<div>
  <img src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/meta/0/08/Wikipedia-logo-v2_1x.png">
</div>

  • does not work for firefox – Sllouyssgort Aug 2 '15 at 11:59
  • it works in firefox now – Gustavo Arias Méndez Nov 19 '15 at 17:52
  • 4
    Just a note to people who want to use this solution: object-fit is not very well supported by browsers. It is not supported by IE or Edge at all. Source: caniuse.com/#feat=object-fit – Sean Dawson Mar 2 '16 at 2:56
  • the object-fit is the one thing I was missing – Andrey Feb 6 at 15:45
<img src="Runtime Path to photo" style="border: 1px solid #000; max-width:64px; max-height:64px;">
  • 2
    This is the correct solution as it continues to be independent of the orientation of the image. 3rror404's solution requires that you know whether the image is wider than it is tall or vice versa. – devios1 Nov 5 '13 at 23:28
  • 2
    also set width and height to auto. – Mahmoodvcs Jan 5 '15 at 8:45
  • Right solution to constraint both height and width. – Pavan Kumar Jul 1 '15 at 9:18
  • An image will be properly restricted by this, but not scaled beyond its original size. Though it is not certain from the opening post which of the two the OP wanted. – Mär Jul 31 at 8:48

Set width and height of the images to auto, but limit both max-width and max-height:

img {
    max-width:64px;
    max-height:64px;
    width:auto;
    height:auto;
}

Fiddle

If you want to display images of arbitrary size in the 64x64px "frames", you can use inline-block wrappers and positioning for them, like in this fiddle.

  • 5
    You're second Fiddle example worked great for me. Thanks! – Daniel Feb 2 '14 at 5:25
  • Will not scale beyond original size, only below the original size. – Mär Jul 31 at 9:17

None of the methods listed scale the image to the largest possible size that fits in a box while retaining the desired aspect ratio.

This cannot be done with the IMG tag (at least not without a bit of JavaScript), but it can be done as follows:

 <div style="background:center no-repeat url(...);background-size:contain;width:...;height:..."></div>
  • 2
    Yes. Use style="background: url('_'); background-size: cover width:_px height:_px" for the <img> tag. – Ujjwal Singh May 22 '14 at 13:53
  • 1
    Thanks, @UjjwalSingh. Indeed, we need cover not contain in order to maximize the image size to the largest possible. contain leads to "letterboxing". – Ortwin Gentz Feb 28 '17 at 10:12

Wrap the image in a div with dimensions 64x64 and set width: inherit to the image:

<div style="width: 64px; height: 64px;">
    <img src="Runtime path" style="width: inherit" />
</div>

Why don't you use a separate CSS file to maintain the height and the width of the image you want to display? In that way, you can provide the width and height necessarily.

eg:

       image {
       width: 64px;
       height: 64px;
       }

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