8

I am saving xml from .NET's XElement. I've been using the method ToString, but the formatting doesn't look how I'd like (examples below). I'd like at most two tags per line. How can I achieve that?


Saving XElement.Parse("<a><b><c>one</c><c>two</c></b><b>three<c>four</c><c>five</c></b></a>").ToString() gives me

<a>
  <b>
    <c>one</c>
    <c>two</c>
  </b>
  <b>three<c>four</c><c>five</c></b>
</a>

But for readability I would rather 'three', 'four' and 'five' were on separate lines:

<a>
  <b>
    <c>one</c>
    <c>two</c>
  </b>
  <b>three
    <c>four</c>
    <c>five</c>
  </b>
</a>

Edit: Yes I understand this is syntactically different and "not in the spirit of xml", but I'm being pragmatic. Recently I've seen megabyte-size xml files with as few as 3 lines—these are challenging to text editors, source control, and diff tools. Something needs to be done! I've tested that changing the formatting above is compatible with our application.

3
  • 2
    +1 to compensate for unexplained downvotes. However, this is not what XML is for. If you want it to be plain text/free format, then you can use something else. xmllint --format does this if you like
    – sehe
    Oct 16 '12 at 10:43
  • Hi Sehe. Xmllint is a Linux program—Is there anything that can format do this for .NET? And What do you mean 'this is not what XML is for'? Oct 16 '12 at 10:56
  • When you say you're trying to improve readability, is this just for when you (and possibly other developers) have to inspect the file for debugging purposes? If it's something that will infrequently happen relative to how often a file is saved out, would achieving the result via post-processing be acceptable or do all files need to be saved out with the extra whitespace?
    – jerry
    Apr 17 '13 at 15:50
13
+50

If you want exactly that output, you'll need to do it manually, adding whitespace around nodes as necessary.

Almost all whitespace in XML documents is significant, even if we only think of it as indenting. When we ask the serializer to indent the document for us, it is making changes to the content that can get extracted, so they try to be as conservative as possible. The elements

<tag>foo</tag>

and

<tag>
    foo
</tag>

have different content, and if an serializer changed the former into the latter, it would change what you get back from your XML API when asking for the contents of <tag>.

The usual rule of thumb is that no indenting will be applied if there's any existing non-whitespace between the elements. In this case, your three between the tags would be modified if a serializer applied the indenting you desire, so nothing will do it for you automatically.


If you have control over the XML format, it's inadvisable to mix element and text children like this, where <b> has both text (three) and element (<c>) children, as it causes issues like what you're seeing.

0
3

The formatting isn't working the way you want because of the naked "three". Is there a reason it's not in it's own tag? Should it be an attribute of "b" instead?

3

Explained reasons to colleagues - we're going to change the file format. I recommend you try to do the same. It's nigh impossible to do what I wanted, because most xml tools assume whitespace is significant.

1
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    The issue is you have mixed content node - if you can get rid of it indenting would work. Before changing format see if implementing your own XmlWriter that will always put elements on new line can solve the issues for you. Apr 20 '13 at 6:35
2

XML is an information exchange format, intended for computers. The whitespace is irrelevant (depending on location and schema, really) and as such, it would be arbitrary to use one or the other.

You could use XmlTextWriter with XElement.Save and see whether you can tweak it to your liking with the XmlWriter.Settings Property

4
  • This is wrong WRT his question - every byte of whitespace shown IS significant, even if we don't think it is at the application level. Nov 11 '12 at 19:48
  • 1
    @JasonViers With all due respect, the context specified by the OP is linq-to-xml. Whitespace is not significant in the sample as given. He just wants it pretty printed. That is a presentation thing and linq-to-xml doesn't directly support it. He could use a custom XmlWriter, though
    – sehe
    Nov 11 '12 at 19:56
  • 1
    Your statement is correct, but we're referring to different contexts. At the application level, as far as linq-to-xml is concerned, it doesn't think the whitespace is significant. The XML Serializer doesn't know linq-to-xml has that distinction (or lack thereof). It only knows of the the XML spec, and according to the spec, all the whitespace in his example XML IS significant. Nov 15 '12 at 16:27
  • 1
    It's true that in general, whitespace is significant in XML. However, sehe is right that it is insignificant in linq-to-xml. I believe this is actually the best answer and that the opener wants to use the XmlWriterSettings.Indent property.
    – jpmc26
    Apr 24 '13 at 6:46
0

I've had to do something similar before (for a client request). All I ended up doing was writing a custom .ToString() method only used for either displaying the XML in a browser(ugh, i know) or for their use in downloading an xml file of the content. Because the code did not have to be computationally efficient, it was merely a matter of checking the children of each tag and arranging the 'hanging' text as such.

Eventually we were able to convince the user that the text should be an attribute instead.

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