183

When using the TypeScript plugin for vs.net, how do I make one TypeScript file import modules declared in other TypeScript files?

file 1:

module moo
{
    export class foo .....
}

file 2:

//what goes here?

class bar extends moo.foo
{
}

10 Answers 10

223

From TypeScript version 1.8 you can use simple import statements just like in ES6:

import { ZipCodeValidator } from "./ZipCodeValidator";

let myValidator = new ZipCodeValidator();

https://www.typescriptlang.org/docs/handbook/modules.html

Old answer: From TypeScript version 1.5 you can use tsconfig.json: http://www.typescriptlang.org/docs/handbook/tsconfig-json.html

It completely eliminates the need of the comment style referencing.

Older answer:

You need to reference the file on the top of the current file.

You can do this like this:

/// <reference path="../typings/jquery.d.ts"/>
/// <reference path="components/someclass.ts"/>

class Foo { }

etc.

These paths are relative to the current file.

Your example:

/// <reference path="moo.ts"/>

class bar extends moo.foo
{
}
5
  • 1
    This works fine, however, when I compile the code to js. there are no "require" or any kind of link to the external files... from what I can see on other examples, I should do a "import moo = module("moo"); however, it does complain that there is no moo in the current scope Oct 17, 2012 at 8:58
  • 2
    Yes, reference doesn't generates any js code which loads that js after compile. It's just for the compiler. I don't have experience with TypeScript and AMD because I simply bundle the generated js files so everything I need is there. But I see what you need and you can read more about that here: typescriptlang.org/Content/… at page 75 (chapter 9). Btw it worth reading the whole specification, it's relatively short compared to other languages. Oct 17, 2012 at 9:10
  • 3
    You can use the --all flag with tsc on your main .ts file. The compiler figures out all the dependencies based on your reference tags and generates a single output .js file for the entire application: tsc --out app.js main.ts
    – null
    Apr 13, 2014 at 9:57
  • @PeterPorfy is there any way we can strongly type the reference links using T4MVC Jun 29, 2017 at 17:17
  • Note that if TypeScript is told to generate es2015 (or esnext) modules, specifying the file extension in the import statement is mandatory (unless you do this). TypeScript won't add the extension for you. Also, at the moment, it can't output .mjs, so that extension has to be .js. Feb 8, 2020 at 5:38
85

Typescript distinguishes two different kinds of modules: Internal modules are used to structure your code internally. At compile-time, you have to bring internal modules into scope using reference paths:

/// <reference path='moo.ts'/>

class bar extends moo.foo {
}

On the other hand, external modules are used to refernence external source files that are to be loaded at runtime using CommonJS or AMD. In your case, to use external module loading you have to do the following:

moo.ts

export class foo {
    test: number;
} 

app.ts

import moo = module('moo');
class bar extends moo.foo {
  test2: number;
}

Note the different way of brining the code into scope. With external modules, you have to use module with the name of the source file that contains the module definition. If you want to use AMD modules, you have to call the compiler as follows:

tsc --module amd app.ts

This then gets compiled to

var __extends = this.__extends || function (d, b) {
    function __() { this.constructor = d; }
    __.prototype = b.prototype;
    d.prototype = new __();
}
define(["require", "exports", 'moo'], function(require, exports, __moo__) {
    var moo = __moo__;

    var bar = (function (_super) {
        __extends(bar, _super);
        function bar() {
            _super.apply(this, arguments);

        }
        return bar;
    })(moo.foo);
})    
8
  • 7
    I feel completely lost right now, no matter what I do, the compiler generates a separate .js for each .ts file and there are no "require" code in either of them... also " import moo=module("moo"); " gives an error that the name moo does not exist in the current scope , highlighting the module("moo") part Oct 17, 2012 at 9:27
  • A few points to clarify here: Are you working in Visual Studio? Did you try to compile the code I gave in the answer using tsc directly? Did you place both files in the same directory?
    – Valentin
    Oct 17, 2012 at 9:34
  • 1
    yes, compiling from commandline , both files in the same directory. Oct 17, 2012 at 9:54
  • 2
    I have forked and sent you a pull request. Please let me know if that worked.
    – Valentin
    Oct 17, 2012 at 11:58
  • 12
    perfect :) for others reading this: modules needs to be exported too, "export module xxx" Oct 17, 2012 at 12:14
23

If you're using AMD modules, the other answers won't work in TypeScript 1.0 (the newest at the time of writing.)

You have different approaches available to you, depending upon how many things you wish to export from each .ts file.

Multiple exports

Foo.ts

export class Foo {}
export interface IFoo {}

Bar.ts

import fooModule = require("Foo");

var foo1 = new fooModule.Foo();
var foo2: fooModule.IFoo = {};

Single export

Foo.ts

class Foo
{}

export = Foo;

Bar.ts

import Foo = require("Foo");

var foo = new Foo();
5
  • I like the above approach, and find that tsc.exe is generating correct dependencies in that initial call to define(), which is GREAT! The problem for me is 2 separate classes, each in their own file, each wrapped in an export module - I can do the "import", and one could use the other, but can class A inherit from B, still using the TypeScript extends somehow? Feb 13, 2014 at 20:02
  • @SamuelMeacham, sure, I don't see why not. If you're still having trouble, ask a new question and link to it here. I'll take a look. Feb 13, 2014 at 21:47
  • 1
    This got me sorted out, everything is super smooth now. Dependencies, inheritance, all of it: stackoverflow.com/questions/21179144/… Feb 26, 2014 at 19:25
  • @SamuelMeacham are you referring to this page or the link you provided, because this answer from Drew seems spot on... Dec 3, 2014 at 1:42
  • This answer is quite outdated (2014). The current syntax is described in the Modules section of the TypeScript handbook. Feb 8, 2020 at 5:40
18

If you are looking to use modules and want it to compile to a single JavaScript file you can do the following:

tsc -out _compiled/main.js Main.ts

Main.ts

///<reference path='AnotherNamespace/ClassOne.ts'/>
///<reference path='AnotherNamespace/ClassTwo.ts'/>

module MyNamespace
{
    import ClassOne = AnotherNamespace.ClassOne;
    import ClassTwo = AnotherNamespace.ClassTwo;

    export class Main
    {
        private _classOne:ClassOne;
        private _classTwo:ClassTwo;

        constructor()
        {
            this._classOne = new ClassOne();
            this._classTwo = new ClassTwo();
        }
    }
}

ClassOne.ts

///<reference path='CommonComponent.ts'/>

module AnotherNamespace
{
    export class ClassOne
    {
        private _component:CommonComponent;

        constructor()
        {
            this._component = new CommonComponent();
        }
    }
}

CommonComponent.ts

module AnotherNamespace
{
    export class CommonComponent
    {
        constructor()
        {
        }
    }
}

You can read more here: http://www.codebelt.com/typescript/javascript-namespacing-with-typescript-internal-modules/

0
12

I would avoid now using /// <reference path='moo.ts'/>but for external libraries where the definition file is not included into the package.

The reference path solves errors in the editor, but it does not really means the file needs to be imported. Therefore if you are using a gulp workflow or JSPM, those might try to compile separately each file instead of tsc -out to one file.

From Typescript 1.5

Just prefix what you want to export at the file level (root scope)

aLib.ts

{
export class AClass(){} // exported i.e. will be available for import
export valueZero = 0; // will be available for import
}

You can also add later in the end of the file what you want to export

{
class AClass(){} // not exported yet
valueZero = 0; // not exported yet
valueOne = 1; // not exported (and will not in this example)

export {AClass, valueZero} // pick the one you want to export
}

Or even mix both together

{
class AClass(){} // not exported yet
export valueZero = 0; // will be available for import
export {AClass} // add AClass to the export list
}

For the import you have 2 options, first you pick again what you want (one by one)

anotherFile.ts

{
import {AClass} from "./aLib.ts"; // you import only AClass
var test = new AClass();
}

Or the whole exports

{
import * as lib from "./aLib.ts"; // you import all the exported values within a "lib" object
var test = new lib.AClass();
}

Note regarding the exports: exporting twice the same value will raise an error { export valueZero = 0; export {valueZero}; // valueZero is already exported… }

1
  • I was missing the curly braces around the imported type, so this line fixed it for me: import {AClass} from "./aLib.ts"; Dec 8, 2016 at 22:51
11

Since TypeScript 1.8+ you can use simple simple import statement like:

import { ClassName } from '../relative/path/to/file';

or the wildcard version:

import * as YourName from 'global-or-relative';

Read more: https://www.typescriptlang.org/docs/handbook/modules.html

3
3

used a reference like "///<reference path="web.ts" /> and then in the VS2013 project properties for building "app.ts","Typescript Build"->"Combine javascript output into file:"(checked)->"app.js"

1

If you are doing something for the web you need to use the js file extension:

import { moo } from 'file.js';


If you are doing something for nodejs I don't think use the js file extension:

import { moo } from 'file';
1
  • 1
    Thanks but I asked this 8 years ago.. I've solved it now ;-) Dec 15, 2020 at 15:54
0
import {className} from 'filePath';

remember also. The class you are importing , that must be exported in the .ts file.

1
-1

Quick Easy Process in Visual Studio

Drag and Drop the file with .ts extension from solution window to editor, it will generate inline reference code like..

/// <reference path="../../components/someclass.ts"/>

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.