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Using OpenCL, I can't seem to pull more than 7MB/sec of data off of a Radeon 7970 into the main memory of my i5 Desktop.

#include <iostream>
#include <Windows.h>
#include <CL/cl.h>

int main(int argc, char ** argv)
{
    cl_platform_id platform;
    clGetPlatformIDs(1, &platform, NULL);
    cl_device_id device;
    clGetDeviceIDs(platform, CL_DEVICE_TYPE_GPU, 1, &device, NULL);
    cl_context context = clCreateContext(NULL, 1, &device, NULL, NULL, NULL);
    cl_command_queue queue = clCreateCommandQueue(context, device, 0, NULL);
    const char *source =
    "__kernel void copytest(__global short* dst) {\n"
    "    __local short buff[1024];\n"
    "    for (int i = 0; i < 1024; i++) {\n"
    "        for (int j = 0; j < 1024; j++)\n"
    "            buff[j] = j;\n"
    "        (void)async_work_group_copy(&dst[i*1024], buff, 1024, 0);\n"
    "    }\n"
    "}\n";
    cl_program program = clCreateProgramWithSource(context, 1, &source, NULL, NULL);
    clBuildProgram( program, 1, &device, NULL, NULL, NULL);
    cl_kernel kernel = clCreateKernel( program, "copytest", NULL);
    cl_mem buf = clCreateBuffer(context, CL_MEM_WRITE_ONLY, 1024 * 1024 * 2, NULL, NULL);
    const size_t global_work_size = 1;
    clSetKernelArg(kernel, 0, sizeof(buf), (void*)&buf);
    LARGE_INTEGER pcFreq = {}, pcStart = {}, pcEnd = {};
    QueryPerformanceFrequency(&pcFreq);
    QueryPerformanceCounter(&pcStart);
    clEnqueueNDRangeKernel(queue, kernel, 1, NULL, &global_work_size, NULL, 0, NULL, NULL);
    clFinish(queue);
    QueryPerformanceCounter(&pcEnd);
    std::cout << 2.0 * pcFreq.QuadPart / (pcEnd.QuadPart-pcStart.QuadPart) << "MB/sec";
}

As you can see, it's operating all just on a single work unit. I tried replacing the async_work_group_copy() with a loop distributed amongst multiple (64) work units, but that did not help.

Is there some way to pull memory off faster from the Radeon than 7MB/sec? I'm interested in the hundreds of MB/sec. Would NVidia be faster?

  • Do you need to copy it in 1kB chunks? Try experimenting with at least a pagesize (4096B), and perhaps an R600 cacheline size (3-64MB). – qdot Oct 17 '12 at 16:07
  • Changing to 2048 shorts (4096B) proved to be no different. If I increase the size of the array declaration beyond that clBuildProgram fails with "Creating kernel failed". – Michael Malak Oct 17 '12 at 16:25
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The problem is that you are only using one thread on the GPU, leaving some thousands of threads idle. There are two things that you could do to help you achieve faster speeds in this case.

Firstly, try using more threads in the work group:

__kernel void copytest(__global short* dst) {
    __local short buff[1024];
    for (int i = 0; i < 1024; i++) {
        for (int j = get_local_id(0); j < 1024; j+= get_local_size(0))
            buff[j] = j;
        barrier(CLK_LOCAL_MEM_FENCE);
        (void)async_work_group_copy(&dst[i*1024], buff, 1024, 0);
    }
}

then you can increase the size of your workgroups to something like 256 or so.

const size_t local_work_size = 256;
clEnqueueNDRangeKernel(queue, kernel, 1, NULL, &global_work_size, &local_work_size, 0, NULL, NULL);

Secondly, you're using the GPU, so you probably shouldn't be using only one work group. You could use more workgroups as in:

__kernel void copytest(__global short* dst) {
    __local short buff[1024];
    for (int i = get_group_id(0); i < 1024; i += get_num_groups(0)) {
        for (int j = get_local_id(0); j < 1024; j+= get_local_size(0))
            buff[j] = j;
        barrier(CLK_LOCAL_MEM_FENCE);
        (void)async_work_group_copy(&dst[i*1024], buff, 1024, 0);
    }
}

Then you can increase the number of workgroups:

const size_t local_work_size = 256;
const size_t global_work_size = local_work_size * 32;
clEnqueueNDRangeKernel(queue, kernel, 1, NULL, &global_work_size, &local_work_size, 0, NULL, NULL);

Hopefully, this will help speed up your application.

  • Thank you. I had not tried parallelizing the number-crunching -- only the memory transfer. Your code did speed it up by a factor of 40, and I suspect because of the way the results are distributed in memory and not because the number-crunching, which is trivial, is now distributed. My number-crunching is in reality an IIR which is by nature a serial calculation. Through some algebra, I managed to deserialize it a bit, but I didn't deserialize the memory writes. I will try deserializing both now, and report back. Thank you! – Michael Malak Oct 17 '12 at 18:17
  • Even if you can't deserialize the computation, you need to use more than one thread for the work_group_copy. You can bound the rest of your computation by if(get_local_id(0)==0) to make sure only one thread is doing the computation. – KLee1 Oct 17 '12 at 18:53
  • After some more testing, the problem is actually with the if(get_local_id(0)==0) that you most recently suggested. The solution turns out as I suggested after reading (and testing out) your original answer: the writes to buff[] must reside on separate work units to realize a speedup. So when I struggle through algebra to map my recurrence relation onto two work units, I get a nice speedup (25%). I will now have to struggle even harder to map it onto 4 or 8 work units. – Michael Malak Oct 18 '12 at 21:41
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Ensure that you allocate your buffer correctly: read the NVIDIA OpenCL programming guide (if you can find it) to look at allocating pinned memory. There is a fully fledged example that should let you achieve 6GB/s - the same principles apply to AMD. In particular, the CL_MEM_ALLOC_HOST_PTR flag.

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You don't really need your 'j' loop here. async_work_group_copy works both ways; you can copy to/from global and local spaces.

//kernel will copy 2MB of short* in memory
__kernel void copytest(__global short* dst) {
  __local short buff[1024];
  for (int i = get_group_id(0); i < 1024; i += get_num_groups(0)) {
    (void)async_work_group_copy(buff, &dst[i*1024], 1024, 0);
    (void)async_work_group_copy(&dst[i*1024], buff, 1024, 0);
  }
}

The opencl 1.0 spec says there must be 16kb or more local memory available for you to use (32kb+ with ocl v1.1 or later). Many devices actually have 32kb. I recommend polling the system and using as much as you can. Realistically, you still need to save some local memory for other purposes. see clGetDeviceInfo (CL_DEVICE_LOCAL_MEM_SIZE)

//using 16kb local memory per work group to copy 2MB...
__kernel void copytest(__global short* dst) {
  __local short buff[16384];
  for (int i = get_group_id(0); i < 64; i += get_num_groups(0)) {
    (void)async_work_group_copy(buff, &dst[i*16384], 16384, 0);
    (void)async_work_group_copy(&dst[i*16384], buff, 16384, 0);
  }
}

If there is a small enough amount of copying to do, you can get rid of your 'i' loop by using exactly the number of work groups required to complete the work. This results in fewer branches in the assembly.

//using 32kb and 16 work groups to copy 2MB...
__kernel void copytest(__global short* dst) {
  __local short buff[32768];
  int i = get_group_id(0);
  (void)async_work_group_copy(buff, &dst[i*32768], 32768, 0);
  (void)async_work_group_copy(&dst[i*32768], buff, 32768, 0);
}

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