10

So I'm trying to append a char to a char*.

For example I have char *word = " "; I also have char ch = 'x';

I do append(word, ch); Using this method..

void append(char* s, char c)
{

    int len = strlen(s);
    s[len] = c;
    s[len+1] = '\0';
}

It gives me a segmentation fault, and I understand why I suppose. Because s[len] is out of bounds. How do I make it so it works? I need to clear the char* a lot as well, if I were to use something like char word[500]; How would I clear that once it has some characters appended to it? Would the strlen of it always be 500? Thanks in advance.

5
  • 2
    "Because s[len] is out of bounds." <- Very well spotted for a beginner! Congrats. However, you still have another error - a string literal is readonly, you can't modify its contents.
    – user529758
    Oct 17, 2012 at 16:56
  • 2
    @H2CO3 s[len + 1] is out of bounds. s[len] is the null byte, which is not counted by strlen.
    – pmr
    Oct 17, 2012 at 16:57
  • @pmr yep, technically right. I should have written sizeof(s) instead.
    – user529758
    Oct 17, 2012 at 17:01
  • shouldn't the const nature of the string litteral trigger a compiler warning whan passed to the function ?
    – Offirmo
    Oct 17, 2012 at 17:05
  • @H2CO3 definitely not, that's probably 4 or 8 and reflects the size of the pointer.
    – djechlin
    Apr 22, 2013 at 11:45

6 Answers 6

11

Typical C practice would be like:

//returns 1 if failed, 0 if succeeded 
int  append(char*s, size_t size, char c) {
     if(strlen(s) + 1 >= size) {
          return 1;
     }
     int len = strlen(s);
     s[len] = c;
     s[len+1] = '\0';
     return 0;
}

When passing a function an array to modify the function has no idea at compile time how much space it has. Usual practice in C is to also pass the length of the array, and the function will trust this bound and fail if it can't do its work in the space it has. Another option is to reallocate and return the new array, you would need to return char* or take char** as an input but you must think carefully of how to manage heap memory in this situation. But without reallocating, yes, your function must somehow fail if it is asked to append when there is no space left, it's up for you for how to fail.

3
  • This is bad answer because you don't know if *s contains string literals. They are usually stored in read only memory and that may result in access violation if you to modify them. Your code may work but it is considered as undefined behavior. Apr 6, 2017 at 3:16
  • @user1888162 it's also UB if you pass in a large number for size.
    – djechlin
    Apr 6, 2017 at 17:26
  • I get: ‘append’ makes integer from pointer without a cast [-Werror=int-conversion] name, strlen(nickname), " ");
    – bomben
    Dec 17, 2021 at 12:53
5

It is hard to append to a string in-place in C. Try something like this:

char *append(const char *s, char c) {
    int len = strlen(s);
    char buf[len+2];
    strcpy(buf, s);
    buf[len] = c;
    buf[len + 1] = 0;
    return strdup(buf);
}

Be sure to deallocate the returned string when done with it.

FYI: It segfaults probably because the string you are passing is stored in read-only memory. But you're right, you are also writing off of the end (the [len+1] write, not the [len] one).

1
  • char buf[len+2] might not compile, depending on the version of his compiler
    – Tom Tanner
    Oct 17, 2012 at 17:04
3

If you're passing in

append("foo", 'X');

it will crash, because foo is normally put in readonly storage. Even if it isn't it will overwrite something bad probably! In this case the compiler if it's kind should warn you of conversion from const char * to char * which would be a clue.

0

Yes, the assumption you made is - almost - correct - the crash may be because you're trying to write past the bounds of the string (actually only s[strlen(s) + 1] is out of bounds, because s[strlen(s)] is still a valid location - the terminating NUL byte is stored there). But you also can't modify a string literal, because it's usually in some readonly part of the process memory. Both of these actions lead to invocation of undefined behavior, which have the potential of crashing. You can solve this problem by copying the string to a dynamically allocated storage then modifying the copy. Also, you're supposed to use const char * in the argument of your function, because char * suggests that read-only strings can't be passed in.

char *append(const char *orig, char c)
{
    size_t sz = strlen(orig);
    char *str = malloc(sz + 2);
    strcpy(str, orig);
    str[sz] = c;
    str[sz + 1] = '\0';
    return str;
}

Also, don't forget to free() the returned string when it's not needed anymore.

0

You can't really safely append to an arbitrary string, because firstly, string constants tend to be in read-only memory, so trying to write to them is likely to result in a segmentation fault, and secondly, you have no guarantee that if they've passed you a buffer that you haven't shot over the end of it.

In particular, if you do char x[500];

there's no guarantee that strlen(x) will return you 500. It will return you how many characters it has to count forward from the start of x before it reaches a null. It could return you 0, 1 ... 500, 501 ..., depending on what is in x.

Really your only options are to call append with the size of the buffer you are appending to (so you can do something appropriate if the buffer is full), or to make append allocate a new buffer every time it is called, in which case you will need to free the buffer again of course.

0

Appending is best done with snprintf

Include the stdio.h header

#include <stdio.h>

then

void append(char* s, char c)
{

    int len1 = strlen(s);
    int len2 = strlen(c);
    int len = len1 + len2;

    snprintf(s, len, "%s%s", s, c);
}

With this append(" ", "x") will give you " x" and append("", "x") will give you "x"

If you want a delimiter between the word you can do

void append(char* s, char c)
{
     int len1 = strlen(s);
     int len2 = strlen(c);
     int len = len1 + len2;

     snprint(s, len, "%s_%s", s, c);
} 

With this append("ab", "x") will give you "ab_x" and append("", "x") will give you "_x"

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