3

"Return an immutable interface to the original data. You can then change fields in the object, but the caller cannot unless he cheats by casting. You expose only the methods you want the user to have. Doing the same with classes is trickier since a subclass must expose everything its superclass does"

What does he mean you can cheat, and why is it tricky with subclasses ?

source: http://mindprod.com/jgloss/immutable.html

8

You provide an interface that has no mutation methods. Then, you provide mutable implementations that are only known to the creator.

public interface Person
{
    String getName();
}

public class MutablePerson implements Person
{
    private String name;

    public MutablePerson(String name)
    {
        this.name = name;
    }

    @Override
    public String getName()
    {
        return name;
    }

    public void setName(String name)
    {
        this.name = name;
    }
}

At this point, if you return Person objects everywhere, the only way for someone to modify the returned object is to cheat and cast it back to a MutablePerson. In effect, the mutable objects become immutable unless the code is a complete hack.

Person person = new MutablePerson("picky");
// someone is cheating:
MutablePerson mutableAgain = (MutablePerson)person;
mutableAgain.setName("Phoenix");

// person.getName().equals("Phoenix") == true

When not dealing with a bunch of younger programmers that will notice the true implementation is mutable, and thus they can cast it to change it, then you provide the safety of immutability with the benefit of being able to put it together without an endless constructor, or using a Builder (in effect, the mutable version is the Builder). A good way to avoid developers abusing the mutable version is to leave the mutable version as package private so that only the package knows about it. The negative of that idea is that this only works if it will be instantiated in the same package, which may be the case, but it obviously may not be the case in situations such as where DAO's are used with multiple package-defined implementations (e.g., MySQL, Oracle, Hibernate, Cassandra, etc., all returning the same stuff, and hopefully separated from each other to avoid cluttering their packages).

The real key here is that people should never build up from the Mutable objects except to implement further-down interfaces. If you're extending, and then returning an immutable subclass, then it's not immutable if it exposes a mutable object, by definition. For example:

public interface MyType<T>
{
    T getSomething();
}

public class MyTypeImpl<T> implements MyType<T>
{
    private T something;

    public MyTypeImpl(T something)
    {
        this.something = something;
    }

    @Override
    public T getSomething()
    {
        return something;
    }

    public void setSomething(T something)
    {
        this.something = something;
    }
}

public interface MyExtendedType<T> extends MyType<T>
{
    T getMore();
}

public class MyExtendedTypeImpl<T>
        extends MyTypeImpl<T>
        implements MyExtendedType<T>
{
    private T more;

    public MyExtendedTypeImpl(T something, T more)
    {
        super(something);

        this.more = more;
    }

    @Override
    public T getMore()
    {
        return more;
    }

    public void setMore(T more)
    {
        this.more = more;
    }
}

This is honestly the way that Collections in Java should have been implemented. A readonly interface could have taken the place of the Collections.unmodifiable implementations, thus not having people unexpectedly using immutable versions of mutable objects. In other words, you should never hide immutability, but you can hide mutability.

Then, they could sprinkle immutable instances that truly can't be modified, and that would keep developers honest. Similarly, I would likely expect to see an immutable version of the above interface somewhere (with better names):

public class MyTypeImmutable<T> implements MyType<T>
{
    private final T something;

    public MyTypeImmutable(T something)
    {
        this.something = something;
    }

    @Override
    public T getSomething()
    {
        return something;
    }
}
1
  • really complete with nice examples!! +1 – Tivie Oct 18 '12 at 1:52
2

I think that statement is not well worded, and he's touching on more than just immutability (and in fact, what that statement is not even really immutability).

The idea is that if you return an interface to the data, and not the specific class, the caller should only perform the actions on the interface. So if your interface only has getter methods, then there should be no way to manipulate the data (without downcasting).

Consider this hierarchy

interface AnInterface {
  void aGetter();
}

class MyMutableClass {
   void aGetter();
   void aSetter(...);
}

Even though MyMutableClass is mutable, by returning AnInterface, the user doesn't know it's actually a mutable object. So the object isn't actually mutable, but you would have to downcast (or use reflection to access the mutator methods) to know that.

Now let's say you had

class MyImmutableSubclass extends MyMutableClass {
   void anotherGetter();
}

Even though the subclass is "immutable" (which it's not really since its parent class is not immutable), if you return MyImmutableSubclass from the method, the caller can still call aSetter since MyMutableClass exposes it.

In general, using immutable objects is recommended to avoid "leaking" state. Anything that is truly immutable is safe from any manipulation and unintended changes.

1
  • Somewhat implied by your last sentence, but immutability also guarantees thread safety, as there is no risk of the references changing in the middle of execution. Immutability through hidden mutability provides the same benefit under the specific circumstance that it is treated as immutable during thread execution. In other words, just because one thread sees it as immutable, the creator cannot be behind the scenes modifying it. This type of mutability is realistically a convenient way to put an object together that should be "forgotten" once it's represented as immutable, and thus returned. – pickypg Oct 18 '12 at 1:56
1

You can cheat because you can change the type of the returned fields if you typecast to "something" mutable. If you "hide" your class behind a public interface and return that immutable interface, the user can cheat by typecasting your interface to your class.

With subclasses is trickier because any private members of a class are not inherited by the subclass but protected and public are. That means anything that you can access in your parent class from the outside can be accessed in the children from the outside too, so you can't really obfuscate the user as easily as you would with an interface. This is actually possible, i think, since you can override the parent methods, although I don't see much point in it.

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