22

how do I make vim horizontally center the text of the open file?

I don't want to modify the file, just to change the way vim displays it.

To be more clear, when I open a file I currently have this situation:

|<------ textwidth=80 ------->|<-------------- padding -------------->|
|lorem ipsum dolor sit amet.. 
|dsdsda da dsa dsa 

What I'd like to have is the following:

|<--- padding/2 --->|<------ textwidth=80 ------->|<--- padding/2 --->|
|                    lorem ipsum dolor sit amet.. 
|                    dsdsda da dsa dsa 

Of course, for every value of textwidth and padding.

1
  • 1
    Take a look at how this plugin does it. IIRC it uses an empty window on either side to achieve this effect. – Randy Morris Oct 18 '12 at 10:43
12

Vim isn't meant to be a single, centered document editor (when programming, you want to fill every single pixel with relevant information), so there are only workarounds:

a) You can achieve a larger left margin by expanding the fold column. Unfortunately, this is limited to 12 character cells:

:let &foldcolumn = (&columns - &textwidth) / 2

b) You can create an empty padding window to the left (and potentially also to the right, for symmetry).

:execute 'topleft' ((&columns - &textwidth) / 2 - 1) . 'vsplit _paddding_' | wincmd p

The annoying window split can be cleared with:

:hi VertSplit guifg=bg guibg=NONE gui=NONE
3
  • The second solution has also two "bonus features": you can use the left window to take quick (or disposable) notes, always at hand, and you can use your mouse to move the split a little on the left or on the right if you wish (you need :set mouse=a or gvim). – gerlos Sep 4 '16 at 15:09
  • Is it possible to hide _paddding_ from buffer list (and do not access it with :bnext/bprev)? – paulodiovani Jan 28 '20 at 18:02
  • 1
    @paulodiovani yes, vsplit +setlocal\ nobuflisted _padding_ should do it. – Ingo Karkat Jan 28 '20 at 18:57
4

I think you could reach the point using screen. you can open three different windows tiled vertically with

CTRL+a , SHIFT+|

then move to the second one.

2
  • 1
    That doesn't answer the question at all :/ – monokrome Apr 4 '14 at 3:27
  • wow, so there was a reason why it is not marked as the correct answer. Thank you @monokrome :D! – Origama Apr 4 '14 at 11:02
4

Exist several plugins that allow you to get that look, most of them seem to be inspired by Writeroom editor for MacOS.

See for example this screenshot of the the VimRoom plugin, or just search the web for "vim writeroom plugin".

enter image description here

4

I use NERDTree for that reason. NERDTree is a file explorer for vim. You can load NERDTree at startup with any width you like:

enter image description here

This is how I run NERDTree at startup to get what you see in the image. I use vim-plug (a package manager for vim) to load NERDTree.

# Load NERDTree Plugin via vim-plug
call plug#begin()
Plug 'scrooloose/nerdtree', { 'on': 'NERDTreeToggle' }
call plug#end()

let g:NERDTreeWinSize=60  # Set NERDTree width.
NERDTreeToggle            # Open NERDTree at startup.
au VimEnter * wincmd l    # Remove focus from NERDTree window at startup.
1

I was looking for something similar and thanks to @ingo-karkat answer I managed to create a function to toggle the center content on/off.

function! WriteRoomToggle()
  let l:name = '_writeroom_'
  if bufwinnr(l:name) > 0
    wincmd o
  else
    let l:width = (&columns - &textwidth) / 5
    execute 'topleft' l:width . 'vsplit +setlocal\ nobuflisted' l:name | wincmd p
    execute 'botright' l:width . 'vsplit +setlocal\ nobuflisted' l:name | wincmd p
    endif
endfunction

Suggested options and mappings:

" hide vertical split separator
hi VertSplit guifg=bg guibg=NONE gui=NONE
" Do not resize windows on close (good if you also use NERDTree)
set noequalalways

" toggle writeroom on/off
map <silent><Leader>v :call WriteRoomToggle()<CR>

" delete buffer without closing the window
command! Bdelete if len(getbufinfo({'buflisted':1})) > 1 | bprev | bdelete# | else | bdelete | endif
noremap <Leader>x :Bdelete<CR>

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