I used the following line to convert float to int, but it's not as accurate as I'd like:

 float a=8.61f;
 int b;

 b=(int)a;

The result is : 8 (It should be 9)

When a = -7.65f, the result is : -7 (It should be -8)

What's the best way to do it ?

  • 13
    I should point out that just typecasting truncates the value and does not perform any rounding/flooring operations on the value. – Brian Graham Mar 19 '12 at 16:05
up vote 589 down vote accepted

Using Math.round() will round the float to the nearest integer.

  • 1
    why is the typecast needed after Math.round()? – necromancer Jun 9 '12 at 1:51
  • 77
    Math.round() returns int value so typecasting using (int) is redundant. – Solvek Jul 2 '12 at 18:13
  • 4
    use either/or... (int)foo is simpler. – yuttadhammo Jul 12 '12 at 9:39
  • 29
    Solvek's answer is right, but I'd like to point out that Math.round() can have two different output types based on the input. Math.round(double a) returns a long. Math.round(float a) returns an int. docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/lang/… – Hososugi Mar 13 '14 at 17:47
  • 2
    Math.round() is a slow operation compared to casting to (int) – darkgaze Nov 15 '16 at 10:54

Actually, there are different ways to downcast float to int, depending on the result you want to achieve: (for int i, float f)

  • round (the closest integer to given float)

    i = Math.round(f);
      f =  2.0 -> i =  2 ; f =  2.22 -> i =  2 ; f =  2.68 -> i =  3
      f = -2.0 -> i = -2 ; f = -2.22 -> i = -2 ; f = -2.68 -> i = -3
    

    note: this is, by contract, equal to (int) Math.floor(f + 0.5f)

  • truncate (i.e. drop everything after the decimal dot)

    i = (int) f;
      f =  2.0 -> i =  2 ; f =  2.22 -> i =  2 ; f =  2.68 -> i =  2
      f = -2.0 -> i = -2 ; f = -2.22 -> i = -2 ; f = -2.68 -> i = -2
    
  • ceil/floor (an integer always bigger/smaller than a given value if it has any fractional part)

    i = (int) Math.ceil(f);
      f =  2.0 -> i =  2 ; f =  2.22 -> i =  3 ; f =  2.68 -> i =  3
      f = -2.0 -> i = -2 ; f = -2.22 -> i = -2 ; f = -2.68 -> i = -2
    
    i = (int) Math.floor(f);
      f =  2.0 -> i =  2 ; f =  2.22 -> i =  2 ; f =  2.68 -> i =  2
      f = -2.0 -> i = -2 ; f = -2.22 -> i = -3 ; f = -2.68 -> i = -3
    

For rounding positive values, you can also just use (int)(f + 0.5), which works exactly as Math.Round in those cases (as per doc).

In theory you could use Math.rint(f) to do the rounding, but rint does not round 0.5 up, it rounds it up or down, whichever of the lower or higher integer is even, so it's useless in most cases.

See

http://mindprod.com/jgloss/round.html

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/lang/Math.html

for more information and some examples.

Math.round(value) round the value to the nearest whole number.

Use

1) b=(int)(Math.round(a));

2) a=Math.round(a);  
   b=(int)a;

Use Math.round(value) then after type cast it to integer.

float a = 8.61f;
int b = (int)Math.round(a);

Math.round also returns an integer value, so you don't need to typecast.

int b = Math.round(float a);
  • 11
    Other answers already say this. Please only add a new answer when you have something new to add. (Also, Math.round doesn't return int.) – Jeffrey Bosboom Mar 4 '15 at 2:04
  • 1
    He give explanation about no need typecast (to Sachithra answer). But it may be converted as comment. – Ranjith Kumar Mar 17 '17 at 4:38

As to me, easier: (int) (a +.5) // a is a Float. Return rounded value.

Not dependent on Java Math.round() types

  • 1
    This will confuse a lot developers that analyze the code. It will not be clear it is rounding. – ivan.panasiuk Feb 1 at 17:57
  • 1
    Of course it is, it s just basic mathematics, just try – Bruno L. Feb 2 at 1:03
  • 1
    "Basic mathematics" is a relative term. :) By my experience, I can bet that more than 50% of developers will not understand that it is really rounding. It is mathematically correct, but as I wrote, it is not clear and it is hard for others to understand what the code does. – ivan.panasiuk Feb 4 at 4:03
  • -(int) ( PI / 3 ): try your code with a negative a... since when -0.5 rounds to 0? – vaxquis Mar 8 at 19:19
  • you re right if the number is negative you must add -0.5 instead – Bruno L. Mar 10 at 3:16

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.