157

In matplotlib, how do I plot error as a shaded region rather than error bars?

For example:

enter image description here

rather than

enter image description here

2
167

Ignoring the smooth interpolation between points in your example graph (that would require doing some manual interpolation, or just have a higher resolution of your data), you can use pyplot.fill_between():

from matplotlib import pyplot as plt
import numpy as np

x = np.linspace(0, 30, 30)
y = np.sin(x/6*np.pi)
error = np.random.normal(0.1, 0.02, size=y.shape)
y += np.random.normal(0, 0.1, size=y.shape)

plt.plot(x, y, 'k-')
plt.fill_between(x, y-error, y+error)
plt.show()

enter image description here

See also the matplotlib examples.

11
  • 1
    Perfect. Yeah I didn't mean to include an example with smoothed lines. – Austin Richardson Oct 18 '12 at 15:49
  • Any idea how to make this show shaded boxes instead of a shaded band? My first instinct was to abuse lw but it appears to not use the same units as the axes. – Benjamin Bannier Aug 27 '13 at 20:30
  • @BenjaminBannier I'm not fully sure what you mean. It sounds as if you'd like a box drawn at each point, its height the same as that of the error bar, while the width should be such that they connect (touch) the neighbouring boxes. Is that correct? – user707650 Aug 28 '13 at 9:13
  • 1
    @EL_DON You mean you'd like a legend with a black line + blue band, and the text would be something like "data + 1 sigma error region"? – user707650 Aug 26 '16 at 6:27
  • 1
    @Allan if the only error bars you have are horizontal, you probably should flip the axes of your actual problem (and thus the figure as well). Normally, the independent variable is the one without (or with very small) error bars. You may be able to cheat, by swapping your data variables, and in matplotlib, swap the axes as well. – user707650 Apr 27 '17 at 7:40
137

This is basically the same answer provided by Evert, but extended to show-off some cool options of fill_between

enter image description here

from matplotlib import pyplot as pl
import numpy as np

pl.clf()
pl.hold(1)

x = np.linspace(0, 30, 100)
y = np.sin(x) * 0.5
pl.plot(x, y, '-k')


x = np.linspace(0, 30, 30)
y = np.sin(x/6*np.pi)
error = np.random.normal(0.1, 0.02, size=y.shape) +.1
y += np.random.normal(0, 0.1, size=y.shape)

pl.plot(x, y, 'k', color='#CC4F1B')
pl.fill_between(x, y-error, y+error,
    alpha=0.5, edgecolor='#CC4F1B', facecolor='#FF9848')

y = np.cos(x/6*np.pi)    
error = np.random.rand(len(y)) * 0.5
y += np.random.normal(0, 0.1, size=y.shape)
pl.plot(x, y, 'k', color='#1B2ACC')
pl.fill_between(x, y-error, y+error,
    alpha=0.2, edgecolor='#1B2ACC', facecolor='#089FFF',
    linewidth=4, linestyle='dashdot', antialiased=True)



y = np.cos(x/6*np.pi)  + np.sin(x/3*np.pi)  
error = np.random.rand(len(y)) * 0.5
y += np.random.normal(0, 0.1, size=y.shape)
pl.plot(x, y, 'k', color='#3F7F4C')
pl.fill_between(x, y-error, y+error,
    alpha=1, edgecolor='#3F7F4C', facecolor='#7EFF99',
    linewidth=0)



pl.show()
1

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.