11

I need a multi-dimensional data structure, where each dimension is a small list which is known at design time.

At different places in my program, I'd like to be able to access the data "sliced" by different dimensions, in strongly-typed fashion.

I've put some sample code below that works for a 2D example using nested interfaces, but I imagine it would get pretty horrendous in 3D or 4D. As @kvb identified, the boilerplate code required would grow exponentially.

Does anyone have a better suggestion? By which I mean, keeping the code required simple/short/easy to understand, while still retaining the ability to do things along the following lines:

Data a = new Data(...)
...
SomeMethodThatOnlyCaresAboutRedThings(a.Red) // takes a IBySize<T>
...
SomeMethodThatOnlyCaresAboutBigThings(a.Big) // takes a IByColour<T>
...

This avoids those methods having to know about parts of the data structure that aren't relevant to them, hence making them more easily testable.

I've used colours/sizes here purely as an example, apologies for inadvertently misleading anyone that these choices were meaningful. T could be a simple data item like a float or some other simple data structure.

Tagged as F# and C# as I'd be happy with a solution in either.

public interface IByColour<T>
{
    T Green { get; }
    T Red { get; }
    T Blue { get; }
}

public interface IBySize<T>
{
    T Small { get; }
    T Big { get; }
}

internal class ByColour<T> : IByColour<T>
{
    public T Green { get; private set; }
    public T Red { get; private set; }
    public T Blue { get; private set; }

    internal ByColour(T green, T red, T blue)
    {
        Green = green;
        Red = red;
        Blue = blue;
    }
}

internal class BySize<T> : IBySize<T>
{
    public T Small { get; private set; }
    public T Big { get; private set; }

    internal BySize(T small, T big)
    {
        Small = small;
        Big = big;
    }
}

public class Data<T> : IByColour<IBySize<T>>, IBySize<IByColour<T>>
{
    public IBySize<T> Green { get; private set; }
    public IBySize<T> Red { get; private set; }
    public IBySize<T> Blue { get; private set; }

    public IByColour<T> Small { get; private set; }
    public IByColour<T> Big { get; private set; }

    public Data(IBySize<T> green, IBySize<T> red, IBySize<T> blue)
    {
        Green = green;
        Red = red;
        Blue = blue;

        Small = new ByColour<T>(Green.Small, Red.Small, Blue.Small);
        Big = new ByColour<T>(Green.Big, Red.Big, Blue.Big);
    }
}

EDIT: to clarify what I mean by "better", a desirable property my solution has, and explain how I'd like to use it.

17
  • Are you using .NET 4.0? If so, have you considered just using a Tuple? Oct 18, 2012 at 16:57
  • 1
    What does an example T even look like? I can't picture it.
    – Bobson
    Oct 18, 2012 at 16:58
  • 1
    @Bobson, I assume int and float would be logical.
    – Kirk Woll
    Oct 18, 2012 at 16:59
  • 1
    You will need to explain by what criteria "better" is supposed to be evaluated against. Performance? Ease of implementation? Ease of access? run-time flexibility? There are a lot of possibilities. Oct 18, 2012 at 17:15
  • 1
    Note that if you have k dimensions, then your approach needs something like 2<sup>k</sup>-2 logical interfaces, plus a bunch of classes. If you want the same effect, but without creating so many actual types, then an F# type provider might be a neat way to achieve a similar interface.
    – kvb
    Oct 18, 2012 at 21:23

3 Answers 3

5

This sounds like a good use of a good old fashioned DataTable. Then you can use Linq to slice and dice however you want, and any unique types created by different combinations of columns selected are generated automatically by the compiler. All the columns in a DataTable are strongly typed, as are results of queries against them. Also, the DataColumns in a DataTable can have any type at all, including complex objects or you own enumeration types.

If you want to stick with a more mathy / immutable / F# way of doing things, you could use an array or List of Tuple<Type1, Type2, .. TypeN>, which is basically the same thing as a DataTable anyway.

If you gave a little more background on what you're modeling I could provide an example. I'm not sure if the code you posted is supposed to represent clothes, images (RGB color space) or something completely different.

[An hour later] Well, no update from the OP so I'll proceed with an example where I use List<Tuple<x, y, ..n>> and assume the objects are clothing items.

// Some enums
public enum Size { Small, Medium, Large }
public enum Color { Red, Green, Blue, Purple, Brown }
public enum Segment { Men, Women, Boys, Girls, Infants }

// Fetches the actual list of items, where the object
// item is the actual shirt, sock, shoe or whatever object
static List<Tuple<Size, Color, Segment, object>> GetAllItems() {
    return new List<Tuple<Size, Color, Segment, object>> {
        Tuple.Create(Size.Small, Color.Red, Segment.Boys, (object)new { Name="I'm a sock! Just one sock." }),
        Tuple.Create(Size.Large, Color.Blue, Segment.Infants, (object)new { Name="Baby hat, so cute." }),
        Tuple.Create(Size.Large, Color.Green, Segment.Women, (object)new { Name="High heels. In GREEN." }),
    };
}

static void test() {
    var allItems = GetAllItems();

    // Lazy (non-materialized) definition of a "slice" of everything that's Small
    var smallQuery = allItems.Where(x => x.Item1 == Size.Small);

    // Lazy map where the key is the size and the value is 
    // an IEnumerable of all items that are of that size
    var sizeLookup = allItems.ToLookup(x => x.Item1, x => x);

    // Materialize the map as a dictionary the key is the size and the 
    // value is a list of all items that are of that size
    var sizeMap = sizeLookup.ToDictionary(x => x.Key, x => x.ToList());

    // Proof:
    foreach (var size in sizeMap.Keys) {
        var list = sizeMap[size];
        Console.WriteLine("Size {0}:", size);
        foreach (var item in list) {
            Console.WriteLine("  Item: {{ Size={0}, Color={1}, Segment={2}, value={3} }}",
                item.Item1, item.Item2, item.Item3, item.Item4);
        }
    }
}
6
  • Really? A DataTable? For multi-dimensional data structure support?
    – Kirk Woll
    Oct 18, 2012 at 16:58
  • @KirkWoll - As far as I can see from the question, this looks entirely like a set of properties of T. Which means one row per T, and one column per property. The query is multi-dimensional, but the data doesn't look it.
    – Bobson
    Oct 18, 2012 at 17:01
  • 1
    @KirkWoll Really! Like Bobson, I'm not yet seeing the intrinsically multidimensional nature of the data, as for a example a 4 dimensional hypercube grid of integer coordinates is intrinsically multidimensional. Then you may indeed want the cube slice at (x=1) or the planar slice at (y=4, z2=13)... Oct 18, 2012 at 17:09
  • He's right, actually. Relational DataTables are inherently multi-dimensional, so long as you include the array-indexes as key columns in the DataRow. Oct 18, 2012 at 18:45
  • @RBarryYoung, of course relational dbs support multi-dimensional modeling, but that doesn't mean they are a good fit as a substitute for a multi-dimensional data structure. To everyone else -- the OP very explicitly stated that his example was 2D but that he was trying to support arbitrary levels of depth.
    – Kirk Woll
    Oct 18, 2012 at 21:31
2

Did you consider this kind of approach:

public enum ElementSize
{
    Small,
    Big
}

public enum ElementColor
{
    Green,
    Red,
    Blue
}

public enum Temperature
{
    Hot,
    Cold
}

public class Element<T>
{
    public T Value { get; set; }
    public ElementColor Color { get; set; }
    public Temperature Temperature { get; set; }
    public ElementSize Size { get; set; }
}

public class Data<T>
{
    private readonly IList<Element<T>> list = new List<Element<T>>();

    public T Value
    {
        get
        {
            if ( list.Count == 1 )
                return list[0].Value;
            else
                throw new Exception("Throw a proper exception or consider not implementing this property at all");
        }
    }

    public Data<T> Green
    {
        get { return FilterByColor(ElementColor.Green); }
    }

    public Data<T> Red
    {
        get { return FilterByColor(ElementColor.Red); }
    }

    private Data<T> FilterByColor(ElementColor color)
    {
        return new Data<T>(from x in list where x.Color == color select x);
    }

    //etc...

    public Data<T> Small
    {
        get { return new Data<T>(from x in list where x.Size == ElementSize.Small select x); }
    }

    public Data<T> Cold
    {
        get { return new Data<T>(from x in list where x.Temperature == Temperature.Cold select x); }
    }

    public void Add(Element<T> element)
    {
        list.Add(element);
    }

    public Data(IEnumerable<Element<T>> list)
    {
        this.list = new List<Element<T>>(list);
    }
}

Sorry for the code quality. It's just to show the idea.

1
  • This is effectively just translating a flat DataTable to a flat class. It's the way I'd do it, but if the one won't work for the OP for some reason, the other won't either.
    – Bobson
    Oct 18, 2012 at 19:40
1

This is what you could do in F#:

/// Use discriminated unions which are safer than enums
type Size = Smal | Big
type Color = Red | Green | Blue

/// Use 'T to demonstrate parameterized records
type Element<'T> = {Value: 'T; Size: Size; Color: Color}

/// Query on a list of elements using pattern matching on records
let getElementsByColor color elements = 
    List.filter (fun {Color = c} -> c = color) elements

let getElementsBySize size elements = 
    List.filter (fun {Size = s} -> s = size) elements

Essentially, each property is declared as a property in the record type Element<'T>. Adding more properties to the record type will not change queries much thanks to pattern matching on records.

2
  • 1
    Note that in the original, once you index into a given dimension that dimension basically disappears from the data. Your solution does not share this (desirable) property.
    – kvb
    Oct 18, 2012 at 21:16
  • @kvb - that's exactly the desirable property I'm looking for. Thank you for expressing it so clearly. Oct 19, 2012 at 8:13

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