10

Sometimes it's useful to have something like:

class X {
  ...
}

class Y {
  X X {
    get { ... }
    set { ... }
  }
}

because X describes both what the type is (as a class name), and the value being accessed/mutated (as the property name). So far so good. Suppose you wanted to do the same thing, but in a generic way:

class Z<T> {
  T T {
    get { ... }
    set { ... }
  }
}

For this example, the compiler complains that: The type 'Z<T>' already contains a definition for 'T'.

This happens for properties, variables and methods, and I don't quite understand why - surely the compiler knows that T is a type and can therefore figure it out the same way as in the first example?

Short version: Why does the first example work, but not the second?

EDIT: I've just discovered that if I "Refactor > Rename" the type parameter, say from T to U, the IDE changes it to:

class Z<U> {
  U T {
    get { ... }
    set { ... }
  }
}

so something in there knows what's a type and what's a member name

  • Because they programmed it that way I guess. Perhaps there's a corner case condition (perhaps with subclassing?) that can be avoided by not allowing this case? EDIT: Could even be a bug/oversight. – Chris Sinclair Oct 19 '12 at 10:23
  • 1
    Regarding your refactoring, the refactoring (I think) is a function of Visual Studio whereas the error is a function of the compiler. It's possible Visual Studio has a better sense of this case than the compiler does. – Chris Sinclair Oct 19 '12 at 10:26
  • @ChrisSinclair I thought that might be the case, but it does seem to show that the compiler should in theory be able to sort it out too? – Philip C Oct 19 '12 at 10:27
  • in theory sure. I'm just speculating that this is such a corner case that it's plausible it's a bug. I'd be curious to know what the Mono compiler does (don't have one with me right now) – Chris Sinclair Oct 19 '12 at 10:31
  • 2
    I'd guess the want to use the same full name Y.T, whereas in other cases the full names are different. I suspect that you can't have a nested class Y.T together with a property Y.T either. – CodesInChaos Oct 19 '12 at 10:48
3

Another possibility I think lay in the error message:

The type 'Z' already contains a definition for 'T'.

Any single type can possibly only define a uniquely named identifier once (overloaded methods aside as they have parameters too).

In the first example X (type) is not defined by class Y; it's defined outside. Whereas X (property) is defined by class Y.

In your second example for Z<T>, T (type) is defined by class Z and T (property) is also defined by the class Z. Compiler recognizes that it's creating two identifiers of the same name for a single class, throws its hands up and says, "Nope! Nope! Nope!"

(Then as @Rawling points out, the VS IDE team got stuck with the bad news.)

4

Possible answer:

When you're writing the non-generic version, you probably can't control the name of class X, and people might expect your property to be called X, so you might not have a choice.

When you're writing the generic version, nobody really cares what you called the type parameter, so you can work around this by just choosing another name.

Ergo, when writing the new generic compiler stuff, the team went "We could make our compiler able to figure out when he means type-parameter-T and when he means property-T, but it's not really necessary as he can work around it, so let's spend our time on something more productive instead."

(And the VS team then went "Damn, the compiler team have saddled us with this, now we need to figure out how to let the user refactor this when he finds out it can't compile"...)

  • Another possibility I think lay in the error message: The type 'Z<T>' already contains a definition for 'T'. Any single type can possibly only define a uniquely named identifier once (overloaded methods aside as they have parameters too). In the first example X (type) is not defined by Y; it's defined outside. Whereas X (property) is defined by Y. In Z<T>, T (type) is defined by Z and T (property) is defined by Z. Compiler throws its hands up and says, "Nope! Nope! Nope!" +1 for your thoughts on how this might have gone down at Microsoft HQ. Damn – Chris Sinclair Oct 19 '12 at 10:43
  • @Chris, I think you've nailed it. If you move the definition of X inside Y, you get the same error message. Make an answer out of it :p (As an edge case, if this wasn't an error, make the propery static, then you can't tell what Y.X refers to. But you don't have this issue in the generic case.) – Rawling Oct 19 '12 at 10:47
  • @Rawling choosing another name is nice, but question is about why compiler does not allow to use generic parameter name as a member name – Sergey Berezovskiy Oct 19 '12 at 10:55
  • 1
    @lazy "The compiler team didn't think it was worth their time" is quite a common answer to "why can't the compiler do this" - go read some Eric Lippert :) – Rawling Oct 19 '12 at 10:59
  • @Rawling :) Yes, but let's wait until HE tells that :)) – Sergey Berezovskiy Oct 19 '12 at 11:01
0

There's a difference between a type and a name. How would you write a call to the function T when you didn't know (at the time or writing the code) what it was called?

EDIT: the above answer was incorrectly assuming that the intended behaviour was that the property name would vary with the type of T.

  • 2
    I think the property name T is supposed to be constant, not vary based on the type parameter T. – Rawling Oct 19 '12 at 10:23
  • It would be called like z.T() where z is a Z<SomeType> – Philip C Oct 19 '12 at 10:23
  • 1
    Sorry, I misunderstood your question. I thought you wanted the name to vary with the type. – Mark Pattison Oct 19 '12 at 10:37

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