160

As I understand it, in Linq the method FirstOrDefault() can return a Default value of something other than null. What I haven't worked out is what kind of things other than null can be returned by this (and similar) method when there are no items in the query result. Is there any particular way that this can be set up so that if there is no value for a particular query some predefined value is returned as the default value?

4
  • 165
    Instead of YourCollection.FirstOrDefault(), you could use YourCollection.DefaultIfEmpty(YourDefault).First() for example.
    – sloth
    Oct 19 '12 at 10:38
  • 7
    I've been looking for something like the above comment for quite a while, it helped immensely. This should be the accepted answer.
    – Brandon
    Jan 10 '14 at 16:28
  • The above comment is the best answer. May 19 '14 at 14:45
  • In my case @sloth answer did not work when the value returned is nullable and assigned to a non nullable. I used MyCollection.Last().GetValueOrDefault(0) for that. Otherwise @Jon Skeet answer below is IMO correct.
    – Jnr
    Apr 2 '19 at 7:12

13 Answers 13

218

As I understand it, in Linq the method FirstOrDefault() can return a Default value of something other than null.

No. Or rather, it always returns the default value for the element type... which is either a null reference, the null value of a nullable value type, or the natural "all zeroes" value for a non-nullable value type.

Is there any particular way that this can be set up so that if there is no value for a particular query some predefined value is returned as the default value?

For reference types, you can just use:

var result = query.FirstOrDefault() ?? otherDefaultValue;

Of course this will also give you the "other default value" if the first value is present, but is a null reference...

5
  • I know the question asks for reference type but your solution doesn't work for when elements are value types like int. I much prefer the use of DefaultIfEmpty: src.Where(filter).DefaultIfEmpty(defaultValue).First(). Works for both value type and reference type.
    – KFL
    Feb 16 '18 at 21:41
  • @KFL: For non-nullable value types I'd probably use that too - but it's more long-winded for nullable cases.
    – Jon Skeet
    Feb 16 '18 at 21:43
  • Awesome control over return types when default is null .. :) Feb 17 '18 at 9:53
  • "No. Or rather, it always returns the default value for the element type... " - This did it for me, actually.. as I also misundestood the meaning of the function name by assuming you could provide any default value when required Mar 13 '19 at 12:45
  • I really liked this approach, but I did change the "T alternate" with "Func<T> alternate", and then "return alternate();" that way I don't generate the extra object unless I need to. Especially useful if the function is called many times in a row, the constructor is slow or the alternate instance of the type takes a lot of memory.
    – user12601977
    Dec 26 '19 at 15:37
78

You can use DefaultIfEmpty followed by First:

T customDefault = ...;
IEnumerable<T> mySequence = ...;
mySequence.DefaultIfEmpty(customDefault).First();
2
  • I love the idea of DefaultIfEmpty - it works with ALL APIs that need a default to be specified: First(), Last(), etc. As a user, you don't need to remember which APIs allow to specify default which don't. Very elegant!
    – KFL
    Feb 16 '18 at 21:45
  • This is very much the nest answer. Dec 23 '18 at 1:03
53

General case, not just for value types:

static class ExtensionsThatWillAppearOnEverything
{
    public static T IfDefaultGiveMe<T>(this T value, T alternate)
    {
        if (value.Equals(default(T))) return alternate;
        return value;
    }
}

var result = query.FirstOrDefault().IfDefaultGiveMe(otherDefaultValue);

Again, this can't really tell if there was anything in your sequence, or if the first value was the default.

If you care about this, you could do something like

static class ExtensionsThatWillAppearOnIEnumerables
{
    public static T FirstOr<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, T alternate)
    {
        foreach(T t in source)
            return t;
        return alternate;
    }
}

and use as

var result = query.FirstOr(otherDefaultValue);

although as Mr. Steak points out this could be done just as well by .DefaultIfEmpty(...).First().

3
  • Your generic methods need <T> in their names, but more serious is that value == default(T) doesn't work (because who knows if T can be compared for equality?)
    – AakashM
    Oct 19 '12 at 10:54
  • Thanks for pointing that out, @AakashM; I've actually tried this now and I think it should be OK (although I don't like the boxing for value types).
    – Rawling
    Oct 19 '12 at 10:57
  • 3
    @Rawling Use EqualityComparer<T>.Default.Equals(value, default(T)) to avoid the boxing and avoid an exception if value is null
    – Lukazoid
    May 2 '14 at 15:08
20

From the documentation for FirstOrDefault

[Returns] default(TSource) if source is empty;

From the documentation for default(T):

the default keyword, which will return null for reference types and zero for numeric value types. For structs, it will return each member of the struct initialized to zero or null depending on whether they are value or reference types. For nullable value types, default returns a System.Nullable, which is initialized like any struct.

Therefore, the default value can be null or 0 depending on whether the type is a reference or value type, but you cannot control the default behaviour.

0
7

Copied over from comment by @sloth

Instead of YourCollection.FirstOrDefault(), you could use YourCollection.DefaultIfEmpty(YourDefault).First() for example.

Example:

var viewModel = new CustomerDetailsViewModel
    {
            MainResidenceAddressSection = (MainResidenceAddressSection)addresses.DefaultIfEmpty(new MainResidenceAddressSection()).FirstOrDefault( o => o is MainResidenceAddressSection),
            RiskAddressSection = addresses.DefaultIfEmpty(new RiskAddressSection()).FirstOrDefault(o => !(o is MainResidenceAddressSection)),
    };
1
  • 2
    Note that DefaultIfEmpty returns the default IF the collection is empty (has 0 items). If you use First WITH a matching expression like in your example and that condition doesn't find any item your return value will be empty.
    – OriolBG
    Mar 10 '17 at 12:17
5

You can also do this

    Band[] objects = { new Band { Name = "Iron Maiden" } };
    first = objects.Where(o => o.Name == "Slayer")
        .DefaultIfEmpty(new Band { Name = "Black Sabbath" })
        .FirstOrDefault();   // returns "Black Sabbath" 

This uses only linq - yipee!

1
5

Actually, I use two approaches to avoid NullReferenceException when I'm working with collections:

public class Foo
{
    public string Bar{get; set;}
}
void Main()
{
    var list = new List<Foo>();
    //before C# 6.0
    string barCSharp5 = list.DefaultIfEmpty(new Foo()).FirstOrDefault().Bar;
    //C# 6.0 or later
    var barCSharp6 = list.FirstOrDefault()?.Bar;
}

For C# 6.0 or later:

Use ?. or ?[ to test if is null before perform a member access Null-conditional Operators documentation

Example: var barCSharp6 = list.FirstOrDefault()?.Bar;

C# older version:

Use DefaultIfEmpty() to retrieve a default value if the sequence is empty.MSDN Documentation

Example: string barCSharp5 = list.DefaultIfEmpty(new Foo()).FirstOrDefault().Bar;

1
  • 1
    The null propagation operator is not allowed in expression tree lamba's.
    – Lars335
    Oct 23 '17 at 1:20
3

Instead of YourCollection.FirstOrDefault(), you could use YourCollection.DefaultIfEmpty(YourDefault).First() for example.

1
  • When you think that it was helpful, you can upvote. This is not an answer.
    – jannagy02
    Apr 6 '17 at 9:19
2

I just had a similar situation and was looking for a solution that allows me to return an alternative default value without taking care of it at the caller side every time I need it. What we usually do in case Linq does not support what we want, is to write a new extension that takes care of it. That´s what I did. Here is what I came up with (not tested though):

public static class EnumerableExtensions
{
    public static T FirstOrDefault<T>(this IEnumerable<T> items, T defaultValue)
    {
        foreach (var item in items)
        {
            return item;
        }
        return defaultValue;
    }

    public static T FirstOrDefault<T>(this IEnumerable<T> items, Func<T, bool> predicate, T defaultValue)
    {
        return items.Where(predicate).FirstOrDefault(defaultValue);
    }

    public static T LastOrDefault<T>(this IEnumerable<T> items, T defaultValue)
    {
        return items.Reverse().FirstOrDefault(defaultValue);
    }

    public static T LastOrDefault<T>(this IEnumerable<T> items, Func<T, bool> predicate, T defaultValue)
    {
        return items.Where(predicate).LastOrDefault(defaultValue);
    }
}
1

This worked for us

int valueOrDefault = myList.Find(x => x.Id == 1)?.Value ?? -1;
0

I know its been a while but Ill add to this, based on the most popular answer but with a little extension Id like to share the below:

static class ExtensionsThatWillAppearOnIEnumerables
{
    public static T FirstOr<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, Func<T, bool> predicate, Func<T> alternate)
    {
        var thing = source.FirstOrDefault(predicate);
        if (thing != null)
            return thing;
        return alternate();
    }
}

This allows me to call it inline as such with my own example I was having issues with:

_controlDataResolvers.FirstOr(x => x.AppliesTo(item.Key), () => newDefaultResolver()).GetDataAsync(conn, item.ToList())

So for me I just wanted a default resolver to be used inline, I can do my usual check and then pass in a function so a class isn't instantiated even if unused, its a function to execute when required instead!

0

If the list of items is not a nullable type consider casting to a nullable type then firstordefault and null coalescing operator with what ever default value you want.

Example:

static class MyClass
{
    public enum Level { Low, Medium, High }

    public static void Dosomething()
    {
        var levels = Enum.GetValues<Level>();

        var myLevel = levels.Select(x => (Level?)x).FirstOrDefault() ?? Level.Medium; // The Default value other than null
    }
}
-2

Use DefaultIfEmpty() instead of FirstOrDefault().

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