This question is about the unit testing framework xUnit.net.

I need to run some code before any test is executed, and also some code after all tests are done. I thought there should be some kind of attribute or marker interface to indicate the global initialization and termination code, but couldn't find them.

Alternatively, if I invoke xUnit programmatically, I can also achieve what I want with the following code:

static void Main()
{
    try
    {
        MyGlobalSetup();
        RunAllTests();  // What goes into this method?
    }
    finally
    {
        MyGlobalTeardown();
    }
}

Can anyone provide me a hint about how to declaratively or programmatically run some global setup/teardown code?

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up vote 61 down vote accepted

As far as I know, xUnit does not have a global initialization/teardown extension point. However, it is easy to create one. Just create a base test class that implements IDisposable and do your initialization in the constructor and your teardown in the IDisposable.Dispose method. This would look like this:

public abstract class TestsBase : IDisposable
{
    protected TestsBase()
    {
        // Do "global" initialization here; Called before every test method.
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        // Do "global" teardown here; Called after every test method.
    }
}

public class DummyTests : TestsBase
{
    // Add test methods
}

However, the base class setup and teardown code will be executed for each call. This might not be what you want, as it is not very efficient. A more optimized version would use the IClassFixture<T> interface to ensure that the global initialization/teardown functionality is only called once. For this version, you don't extends a base class from your test class but implement the IClassFixture<T> interface where T refers to your fixture class:

using Xunit;

public class TestsFixture : IDisposable
{
    public TestsFixture ()
    {
        // Do "global" initialization here; Only called once.
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        // Do "global" teardown here; Only called once.
    }
}

public class DummyTests : IClassFixture<TestsFixture>
{
    public void SetFixture(TestsFixture data)
    {
    }
}

This will result in the constructor of TestsFixture only being run once for every class under test. It thus depends on what you want exactly to choose between the two methods.

  • 3
    It seems that IUseFixture no longer exists, having been replaced by IClassFixture. – GaTechThomas Jul 14 '15 at 21:00
  • 1
    While this works, I think CollectionFixture in the answer from Geir Sagberg is a better fit for this scenario as it was specifically designed for this purpose. You also don't have to inherit your test classes, you simply mark them with the [Collection("<name>")] attribute – MichelZ Jul 30 '16 at 6:35
  • 2
    Is there any way to do async setup and teardown? – Andrii Sep 3 '17 at 21:22
  • It seems like MS have implemented the IClassFixture solution as well. docs.microsoft.com/en-us/aspnet/core/test/… – lbrahim Jul 19 at 12:39

I was looking for the same answer, and at this time the xUnit documentation is very helpful in regards to how to implement Class Fixtures and Collection Fixtures that give developers a wide range of setup/teardown functionality at the class or group of classes level. This is in line with the answer from Geir Sagberg, and gives good skeleton implementation to illustrate what it should look like.

https://xunit.github.io/docs/shared-context.html

Collection Fixtures When to use: when you want to create a single test context and share it among tests in several test classes, and have it cleaned up after all the tests in the test classes have finished.

Sometimes you will want to share a fixture object among multiple test classes. The database example used for class fixtures is a great example: you may want to initialize a database with a set of test data, and then leave that test data in place for use by multiple test classes. You can use the collection fixture feature of xUnit.net to share a single object instance among tests in several test class.

To use collection fixtures, you need to take the following steps:

Create the fixture class, and put the the startup code in the fixture class constructor. If the fixture class needs to perform cleanup, implement IDisposable on the fixture class, and put the cleanup code in the Dispose() method. Create the collection definition class, decorating it with the [CollectionDefinition] attribute, giving it a unique name that will identify the test collection. Add ICollectionFixture<> to the collection definition class. Add the [Collection] attribute to all the test classes that will be part of the collection, using the unique name you provided to the test collection definition class's [CollectionDefinition] attribute. If the test classes need access to the fixture instance, add it as a constructor argument, and it will be provided automatically. Here is a simple example:

public class DatabaseFixture : IDisposable
{
    public DatabaseFixture()
    {
        Db = new SqlConnection("MyConnectionString");

        // ... initialize data in the test database ...
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        // ... clean up test data from the database ...
    }

    public SqlConnection Db { get; private set; }
}

[CollectionDefinition("Database collection")]
public class DatabaseCollection : ICollectionFixture<DatabaseFixture>
{
    // This class has no code, and is never created. Its purpose is simply
    // to be the place to apply [CollectionDefinition] and all the
    // ICollectionFixture<> interfaces.
}

[Collection("Database collection")]
public class DatabaseTestClass1
{
    DatabaseFixture fixture;

    public DatabaseTestClass1(DatabaseFixture fixture)
    {
        this.fixture = fixture;
    }
}

[Collection("Database collection")]
public class DatabaseTestClass2
{
    // ...
}

xUnit.net treats collection fixtures in much the same way as class fixtures, except that the lifetime of a collection fixture object is longer: it is created before any tests are run in any of the test classes in the collection, and will not be cleaned up until all test classes in the collection have finished running.

Test collections can also be decorated with IClassFixture<>. xUnit.net treats this as though each individual test class in the test collection were decorated with the class fixture.

Test collections also influence the way xUnit.net runs tests when running them in parallel. For more information, see Running Tests in Parallel.

Important note: Fixtures must be in the same assembly as the test that uses them.

  • "Test collections can also be decorated with IClassFixture<>. xUnit.net treats this as though each individual test class in the test collection were decorated with the class fixture." Any chance I could get an example of that? I don't quite understand it. – Tanner Faulkner Sep 19 '17 at 20:35
  • @TannerFaulkner The class fixture was a way to have a CLASS level setup and teardown, like you get with a traditional .net Unit Test Project when you have a Test Initialize method: [TestInitialize] public void Initialize() { – Larry Smith Sep 20 '17 at 22:18
  • Errr.... :-/ I should have said [ClassInitialze] in my comment above. – Larry Smith Nov 14 '17 at 21:16

There is an easy easy solution. Use the Fody.ModuleInit plugin

https://github.com/Fody/ModuleInit

It's a nuget package and when you install it it adds a new file called ModuleInitializer.cs to the project. There is one static method in here that gets weaved into the assembly after build and is run as soon as the assembly is loaded and before anything is run.

I use this to unlock the software license to a library that I have purchased. I was always forgetting to unlock the license in each test and even forgetting to derive the test from a base class which would unlock it. The bright sparks that wrote this library, instead of telling you it was license locked introduced subtle numerical errors which causes tests to fail or pass when they shouldn't. You would never know if you had correctly unlocked the library or not. So now my module init looks like

/// <summary>
/// Used by the ModuleInit. All code inside the Initialize method is ran as soon as the assembly is loaded.
/// </summary>
public static class ModuleInitializer
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Initializes the module.
    /// </summary>
    public static void Initialize()
    {
            SomeLibrary.LicenceUtility.Unlock("XXXX-XXXX-XXXX-XXXX-XXXX");
    }
}

and all tests that are placed into this assembly will have the license unlocked correctly for them.

  • 2
    Solid idea; unfortunately it doesn't appear to work yet with DNX unit tests. – Jeff Dunlop Oct 3 '15 at 1:07

To share SetUp/TearDown-code between multiple classes, you can use xUnit's CollectionFixture.

Quote:

To use collection fixtures, you need to take the following steps:

  • Create the fixture class, and put the the startup code in the fixture class constructor.
  • If the fixture class needs to perform cleanup, implement IDisposable on the fixture class, and put the cleanup code in the Dispose() method.
  • Create the collection definition class, decorating it with the [CollectionDefinition] attribute, giving it a unique name that will identify the test collection.
  • Add ICollectionFixture<> to the collection definition class.
  • Add the [Collection] attribute to all the test classes that will be part of the collection, using the unique name you provided to the test collection definition class's [CollectionDefinition] attribute.
  • If the test classes need access to the fixture instance, add it as a constructor argument, and it will be provided automatically.

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