73

Considering that TEST_SCRIPT is a CLOB why when I run this simple query from SQL*PLUS on Oracle, I get the error:

ORA-00932: inconsistent datatypes: expected - got CLOB

I have been reading a lot of questions about the same error but none of those is running a direct query from SQLPLUS

    UPDATE IMS_TEST 
       SET TEST_Category  = 'just testing'  
     WHERE TEST_SCRIPT    = 'something'
       AND ID             = '10000239' 

Full example:

SQL> create table ims_test(
  2  test_category varchar2(30),
  3  test_script clob,
  4  id varchar2(30)
  5  );

Table created.

SQL> insert into ims_test values ('test1','something','10000239');

1 row created.

SQL> UPDATE IMS_TEST
  2  SET TEST_Category  = 'just testing'
  3  WHERE TEST_SCRIPT    = 'something'
  4  AND ID             = '10000239';
WHERE TEST_SCRIPT    = 'something'
      *
ERROR at line 3:
ORA-00932: inconsistent datatypes: expected - got CLOB
7
  • Does your actual script have the Microsoft curly quotes that were present in your question? Or was that merely an artifact of creating the question? In the actual script, is the string 'something' actually longer than 4000 characters? Oct 19 '12 at 18:14
  • sorry, what do you mean by curly quotes? Are you suggesting the quotes are not the right quotes ? and the string s=in this example is just that. I might have larger strins in the real product but I am just trying to see if this simple query works. Oct 19 '12 at 18:19
  • @user1298925, this query will work but it will fail if you are trying to insert more than 4000 characters in clob field
    – rs.
    Oct 19 '12 at 18:20
  • 1
    @user1298925 - In the question you posted, the quotes around the string just testing were Microsoft curly quotes rather than normal single quotes '. I corrected that in my edit but I'm not sure whether that is something that affects your original script or something that was introduced in the process of creating and posting your question. Are you saying that in the example scripts the strings are really only 10-ish characters long? Oct 19 '12 at 18:25
  • yes they are really only 10-ish character and I made sure my single quotes are correctly typed too. Oct 19 '12 at 18:33
73

You can't put a CLOB in the WHERE clause. From the documentation:

Large objects (LOBs) are not supported in comparison conditions. However, you can use PL/SQL programs for comparisons on CLOB data.

If your values are always less than 4k, you can use:

UPDATE IMS_TEST 
   SET TEST_Category           = 'just testing'  
 WHERE to_char(TEST_SCRIPT)    = 'something'
   AND ID                      = '10000239';

It is strange to search by a CLOB anyways.. could you not just search by the ID column?

5
  • 1
    CLOB field can not be used in MINUS operation as well.
    – Bor
    Jun 3 '15 at 13:35
  • 8
    If your values might be over 4K, you can use where dbms_lob.compare(testscript,:var2) = 0 see stackoverflow.com/a/12590223/1845672
    – Roland
    Jan 11 '16 at 13:03
  • @Jewels : I got a 404 too, then tried the linked again and it worked - weird Aug 6 '18 at 13:11
  • just another oracle's weird error message. there is nothing related among usage of clob on where clause and 'expected - got CLOB'. thank you by the way.
    – yılmaz
    Aug 16 '18 at 16:18
  • 1
    "Comparison Conditions" also include SELECT DISTINCT and GROUP BY
    – mike
    May 29 '19 at 3:50
42

The same error occurs also when doing SELECT DISTINCT ..., <CLOB_column>, ....

If this CLOB column contains values shorter than limit for VARCHAR2 in all the applicable rows you may use to_char(<CLOB_column>) or concatenate results of multiple calls to DBMS_LOB.SUBSTR(<CLOB_column>, ...).

1
  • 1
    also applies to CLOB in GROUP BY clause. Same reason. :-)
    – mike
    May 29 '19 at 3:49
12

Take a substr of the CLOB and then convert it to a char:

UPDATE IMS_TEST 
  SET TEST_Category           = 'just testing' 
WHERE to_char(substr(TEST_SCRIPT, 1, 9))    = 'something'
  AND ID                      = '10000239';
0
2

I just ran over this one and I found by accident that CLOBs can be used in a like query:

   UPDATE IMS_TEST 
   SET TEST_Category  = 'just testing'  
 WHERE TEST_SCRIPT    LIKE '%something%'
   AND ID             = '10000239' 

This worked also for CLOBs greater than 4K

The Performance won't be great but that was no problem in my case.

1
  • You can use LIKE without % wildcards. This makes sure you only match exact values (and should be faster but I don't know if it actually is in practice). WHERE TEST_SCRIPT LIKE 'something'
    – Scar
    Jun 17 at 11:44
1

The problem may lie in selected null values ​​in combination with a CLOB-type column.

select valueVarchar c1 ,
       valueClob c2 ,
       valueVarchar c3 ,
       valueVvarchar c4
of Table_1
union
select valueVarchar c1 ,
       valueClob c2 ,
       valueVarchar c3 ,
       null c4
of table_2

I reworked the cursor. The first cursor is composed of four non-null columns. The second cursor selects three non-null columns. The null values ​​were injected into the cursorForLoop .

1

I found that selecting a clob column in CTE caused this explosion. ie

with cte as (
    select
        mytable1.myIntCol,
        mytable2.myClobCol
    from mytable1
    join mytable2 on ...
)
select myIntCol, myClobCol
from cte
where ...

presumably because oracle can't handle a clob in a temporary table.

Because my values were longer than 4K, I couldn't use to_char().
My work around was to select it from the final select, ie

with cte as (
    select
        mytable1.myIntCol
    from mytable1
)
select myIntCol, myClobCol
from cte
join mytable2 on ...
where ...

Too bad if this causes a performance problem.

0

In my case I was using EntityFramework and the column I was trying to use was called value - i.e. a reserved keyword by oracle.

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