6

I've defined a util.h file with functions that i want to use throughout several different other files. This header has an include guard, however when i use it in two different files, I get a multiple definition of... error. What am i doing wrong?

I've read this but this pertains to variable declaration/definition. This answer seems more relevant but it's not clear to me how i can fix this.

// util.h
// include lots of standard headers
#include ...

#ifndef UTIL_H
#define UTIL_H

using namespace std;
// multiple definition of `randarr(int, int, int)`
int* randarr(int size, int min, int max) {
    int *ret = new int[size];
    for (int i=0; i<size; i++)
            ret[i] = (int) (((double) rand() / RAND_MAX) * max) + min;
    return ret;
}
// no error
template<typename T> void printarr(T* v, int begin, int end) {
    for (int i=begin; i<end; i++)
    cout << v[i] << " ";
    cout << endl;
}
// multiple definition of `is_prime(int)`
bool is_prime(int n) {
    if (n == 2 || n == 3 || n == 5) return true;
    if (n <= 1 || (n&1) == 0) return false;

    for (int i = 3; i*i <= n; i += 2)
            if (n % i == 0) return false;

    return true;
}
#endif

// example.cpp
#include ...// lots of standard includes
#include "util.h"
void f() {
    randarr(...);
    printarr(...);
    is_prime(...);
    ...
}

// Main.cpp
#include "util.h"
int main() {

}
  • Do all the files you include from util.h have include guards. 2: maybe someone undefines the UTIL_H macro someplace. – bert-jan Oct 19 '12 at 20:11
  • You should make randarr() an inline function! – bert-jan Oct 19 '12 at 20:12
  • 4
    Not worth an answer, but no one has commented on the using namespace std; in a header file. As we say in Texas, "get a rope". – David Hammen Oct 19 '12 at 20:18
  • i separated prototypes and implementation, but inlining all the functions works best in this case since the functions are all very short – xst Oct 19 '12 at 20:24
8

The include guards are not the cause of the error; you're violating the One Definition Rule. Since util.h is being included in 2 source files, the translation units created after preprocessing each source file will contain a definition of each of the functions, thus leading to the multiple definition error.

To get rid of the error, mark the functions inline

inline int* randarr(int size, int min, int max) {
  // ...
}

template<typename T> 
inline void printarr(T* v, int begin, int end) {
  // ...
}

inline bool is_prime(int n) {
  // ...
}
  • 4
    Surely the guards are there to prevent the second definition, Aren't they there to allow multiple includes? What does inline even do here to fix this? – Troyseph Sep 7 '15 at 11:21
  • 2
    @Troyseph Yes, include guards prevent multiple inclusion ... within a single translation unit (roughly a .cpp file). They don't protect against anything if you include the header in multiple cpp files, in that case you will run into linker errors for multiple definitions because you've violated ODR (ODR violations are no diagnostic required, so an implementation isn't even required to detect and error out). inline tells the linker to treat multiple definitions as if they were a single definition and pick one definition, thus avoiding the error. – Praetorian Sep 7 '15 at 18:15
10

You are getting a linker error, not a compiler error. You have implemented the function randarr() in your util.h file, which means the compiler sees a copy of randarr() in each of example.cpp and Main.cpp. When the linker goes to link these together, it complains because you're not permitted to have more than one definition of the same function.

You have two choices:

  • declare randarr() as inline in the header file
  • move the definition for randarr() to a util.cpp file

Apply the same fix to is_prime().

3

You define functions in a header file. This means these functions where defined in example.cpp and in Main.cpp.

Define the functions randarr() and is_prime() in a separate util.cpp and the errors are gone.

0

Your header should only contain the prototype of your function. A prototype describes your function to other files, but do not implement it. The only exception is the template, because each template specialisation is build upon compile time.

If you implement your function in your header file, at linker time, you will find multiple times the function content, and that is why you are facing an error.

Move the implementation of randarr and is_prime to another file, and transform you util.h to :

#ifndef UTIL_H
#define UTIL_H

using namespace std;
int* randarr(int size, int min, int max);
template<typename T> void printarr(T* v, int begin, int end) {
    for (int i=begin; i<end; i++)
    cout << v[i] << " ";
    cout << endl;
}
bool is_prime(int n);
#endif
  • There's nothing wrong with defining (as opposed to just declaring) a function in a header -- so long as you qualify it as inline. BTW, function templates that are defined in a header also need to be qualified as inline. If you don't, you're still subject to those linker errors regarding violations of the One Definition Rule. – David Hammen Oct 19 '12 at 20:25
  • Declaring a function as inline changes how the compiler interprets it. And defining function in a header duplicates code over the executable anyways, which is not a good practice at all. – tomahh Oct 19 '12 at 20:31
  • But you are right about templates, I was writing with in template class in mind. – tomahh Oct 19 '12 at 20:33
  • If it's not a good practice, why then are both the C++ standard library and Boost chock full of inline definitions? If a function is short and has low fan-out, defining the function in a header is oftentimes the preferred implementation. – David Hammen Oct 19 '12 at 20:44
  • I didn't explain myself clearly enought, pardon my english. What I meant is that you can't say to someone who do not understand what a header file is to simply inline the functions he uses to make it work. When it comes to optimization, inlining function is useful, but you can not say to a beginner "Put all your utility functions in a header file and inline those" – tomahh Oct 19 '12 at 20:47

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