1

According to http://www.w3.org/TR/2001/CR-css3-selectors-20011113/ the selector E ~ F matches "an F element preceded by an E element". I'm confused as to whether this means only a single F, or any F preceded by E.

For example, should the selector:

E ~ F.blah

match only the first F which is both preceded by E and has class "blah", or all such elements?

  • 2
    Selectors level 3 is already a recommendation, and has changed substantially since the 2001 CR (in particular, ::selection and :contains() are gone). You'll want to refer to w3.org/TR/css3-selectors which is the latest recommendation. – BoltClock Oct 20 '12 at 8:49
3

It matches any and all such elements as long as they're under the same parent.

Unlike the adjacent sibling combinator +, the general sibling combinator ~ doesn't require an element to immediately follow another element. Since there is no such positional restriction, ~ doesn't carry any first-match semantics. (In fact, neither does +, but it's still more restricted in that sense; see below.)

This also means if an element matches E + F.blah, it must also by definition match E ~ F.blah. Conversely, not every element matching E ~ F.blah will also match E + F.blah.

An illustration:

<E></E>
<D>
    <F class="blah"></F> <!-- Not selected [1] -->
    <E></E>
    <F class="blah"></F> <!-- E + F.blah, E ~ F.blah [2] -->
    <F class="blah"></F> <!-- E ~ F.blah only [3] -->
    <F></F>
    <F class="blah"></F> <!-- E ~ F.blah only [3] -->
    <E></E>
    <F class="blah"></F> <!-- E + F.blah, E ~ F.blah [4] -->
</D>
<D>
    <F class="blah"></F> <!-- Not selected [5] -->
</D>

What's selected and what's not:

  1. Not selected
    This F element has class "blah", but it is not preceded by an E element in its parent D.

    Note that the topmost E is a preceding sibling of D, not F, so it isn't counted.

  2. Selected by E + F.blah and E ~ F.blah
    This F element is preceded by an E element in its parent D, and it has class "blah", so it matches the selector E ~ F.blah.

    Since the E element lies immediately before this F element, it also matches E + F.blah.

  3. Selected by E ~ F.blah only
    This F element is preceded by an E element in its parent D, and it has class "blah". However, the E in this case is no longer the immediately-preceding sibling, this element won't match E + F.blah.

  4. Selected by E + F.blah and E ~ F.blah
    Although the first E element doesn't lie immediately before this F element, there is a second E element which does occur immediately before it, so it also matches E + F.blah.

    By the way, this element will match the selector E:first-of-type ~ F.blah but not the selector E:first-of-type + F.blah, since its preceding sibling E is not the first of its type, but the second.

  5. Not selected
    This F element has class "blah", but it is not preceded by any E elements in its parent D, because it's in a different parent D from all the E elements in the example (as well as being its only child).

For what it's worth, it's not possible to select only the first element that matches E ~ F.blah (unless it also matches E + F.blah, in which case you can just use that instead). However, if you're applying CSS rules, it can be achieved using an override — just repeat the sibling combinator:

E ~ F.blah {
    /* Styles for first and following E ~ F.blah */
}

E ~ F.blah ~ F.blah {
    /* Styles for only F.blah following the first E ~ F.blah */
}
  • it's a shame ~ doesn't carry any first-match semantics, it's exactly what I need right now! – danjah Dec 15 '14 at 21:52

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