14

I'm trying to make a macro with the following formula: (a^2/(a+b))*b, and I want to make sure that the there will be no dividing by zero.

#define SUM_A( x, y ) if( x == 0 || y == 0) { 0 } else { ( ( ( x * x ) / ( ( x ) + ( y ) ) ) * ( y ) )}

and then I call the macro inside main:

float a = 40, b = 10, result; 
result = SUM_A(a, b); 
printf("%f", result);

I've tried using brackets around the if function but I keep getting syntax errors before the if statement. I've also tried using return, but I read somewhere that you're not supposed to use that in define.

22

You can not use if statement, because #define is interpret by the preprocessor, and the output would be

 result=if( x == 0 || y == 0) { 0 } else { ( ( ( x * x ) / ( ( x ) + ( y ) ) ) * ( y ) )}

which is wrong syntax.

But an alternative is to use ternary operator. Change your define to

#define SUM_A( x, y )  ((x) == 0 || (y) == 0 ? 0 : ( ( ( (x) * (x) ) / ( ( x ) + ( y ) ) ) * ( y ) ))

Remember to always put your define between parentheses, to avoid syntax error when replacing.

6

if introduces a statement, not an expression. Use the "ternary" (conditional) operator:

#define SUM_A(x, y) (((x) == 0 || (y) == 0)? 0: ((((x) * (x)) / ((x) + (y))) * (y)))

Alternatively, make this an inline function:

inline float sum_a(float x, float y)
{
    if (x == 0 || y == 0)
        return 0;
    else
        return ((x * x) / (x + y)) * y;
}

This avoids the problem of multiple evaluation of x and/or y and is much more readable, but it does fix the types of x and y. You can also drop the inline and let the compiler decide whether inlining this function is worthwhile (inline is not a guarantee that it will perform inlining).

  • The trouble with the function is that it forces you to use float as your datatype. Perhaps that's okay, but perhaps that's not. – SirGuy Oct 20 '12 at 14:29
6

Technically, it is possible to use if statements in a #define (but not in the way you'd expect). Since #defines are just text substitution, you have to be really careful about how you expand it. I found that this works...

#define SUM_A(x, y)                                        \
({                                                         \
    double answer;                                         \
    if ((x) == 0 || (y) == 0)                              \
        answer = 0;                                        \
    else                                                   \
        answer = ((double)((x)*(x)) / ((x)+(y))) * (y);    \
    (answer);                                              \
})
// Typecasting to double necessary, since int/int == int in C

This should give you the result you're looking for, and there's no reason it can't be extended to include multiple else ifs as well (though as other answers have pointed out, it's probably easier to use the ternary operator).

2

There are multiple problems with your macro:

  • it expands to a statement, so you cannot use it as an expression

  • the arguments are not properly parenthesized in the expansion: invoking this macro with anything but variable names or constants will produce problems.

  • the arguments are evaluated multiple times: if you invoke the macro with arguments that have side effects, such as SUM_A(a(), b()) or SUM_A(*p++, 2), the side effect will occur multiple times.

To avoid all these problems, use a function, possibly defined as static inline to help the compiler optimize more (this is optional and modern compilers do this automatically):

static inline int SUM_A(float x, float y) {
    if (x == 0 || y == 0)
        return 0; 
    else
        return x * x / (x + y) * y;
}

Notes:

  • this function uses floating point arithmetic, which the macro would not necessarily, depending on the actual types of its arguments.
  • the test does not prevent division by zero: SUM_A(-1, 1) still performs one.
  • division by zero is not necessarily a problem: with floating point arguments, it produces an Infinity or a NaN, not a runtime error.
1

The problem is that an if statement is not an expression, and doesn't return a value. Besides, there is no good reason to use a macro in this case. In fact, it could cause very serious performance problems (depending on what you pass as macro arguments). You should use a function instead.

0

YES you can have an if statement in a macro. You need to format it correctly. Here is an example:

#define MY_FUNCTION( x )  if( x ) { PRINT("TRUE"); } else { PRINT("FALSE"); } 
  • 1
    This solution is inappropriate because a macro invocation with a trailing ; will expand to 2 statements. Use a do / while(0) wrapper to avoid this. – chqrlie Mar 14 '18 at 23:08
0

I use macros with conditions quite a bit and they do have a legit use.

I have a few structures that are essentially blobs and everything is just a uint8_t stream.

To make internal structures more readable I have conditional macros.

Example...

#define MAX_NODES 10
#define _CVAL16(x)(((x) <= 127) ? (x) : ((((x) & 127) | 0x80) ), ((x) >> 7))  // 1 or 2 bytes emitted <= 127 = 1 otherwise 2

Now to use the macro inside an array ...

uint8_t arr_cvals[] = { _CVAL16(MAX_NODES), _CVAL16(345) };

Three bytes are emitted in the array, 1st macro emits 1 and the second 2 bytes. This is evaluated at compile time and just makes the code more readable.

I also have... for example...

#define _VAL16(x) ((x) & 255), (((x) >> 8) & 255)

For the original problem... maybe the person wants to use the results with constants, but once again really comes down to where and how it's to be used.

#define SUM_A(x, y) (!(x) || !(y)) ? 0 : ((x) * (x) / ((x) + (y)) * (y))
float arr_f[] = { SUM_A(0.5f, 0.55f), SUM_A(0.0f, -1.0f), SUM_A(1.0f, 0.0f) };

At runtime can have...

float x;
float y;

float res = SUM_A(x,y); // note ; on the end

I have a program that creates fonts that are included as code inside C programs and most values are wrapped around macros that split 32 bit values into 4 bytes, float into 4 bytes, etc.

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