120

Out of curiosity, considering the example below, why does having the margin on the #container div cause a vertical scrollbar to appear in the browser? The container is much smaller in height than the body height which is set to 100%.

I have set the padding and margins to 0 for all elements except the #container. Note that I have deliberately omitted absolute positioning on the #container div. In this case how is the browser calculating the height of the body and how is the margin affecting it?

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<style type="text/css">
* { padding:0; margin:0;}
html, body { height:100%; }
#container
{
  padding:10px;
  margin:50px;
  border:1px solid black;
  width: 200px;
  height: 100px;
}
</style>
</head>
<body>
  <div id='container'>
  </div>
</body>
</html>

Example also on JSFiddle

1

16 Answers 16

83

If you paint the backgrounds of html and body (giving each its own color), you'll quickly notice that body is being shifted down along with #container, and #container itself isn't offset from the top of body at all. This is a side effect of margin collapse, which I cover in detail here (although that answer describes a slightly different setup).

It's this behavior that's causing the scrollbar to appear, since you've declared body to have 100% the height of html. Note that the actual height of body is unaffected, as margins are never included in height calculations.

11
  • Does this mean the heights of elements on a page are calculated starting with the window, then the body, then elements inside/or above the body? Are all percentages converted into px or pt or em values?
    – TMB
    Oct 20, 2012 at 15:51
  • 6
    @TMB: A 100% height on html makes it 100% of the viewport (a browser's viewing area), and a 100% height on body makes it 100% of its parent, which is html. Any percentages that follow are always that of an element's ancestor(s). If you don't set 100% height on html or body then they behave like any other block element. See w3.org/TR/CSS21/syndata.html#percentage-units for details. %s and ems will eventually all have to be converted to some absolute value during rendering, in order for a browser to know exactly how large or small to measure and render things on screen.
    – BoltClock
    Oct 20, 2012 at 15:53
  • 1
    @neodymium: That's right. Both html and body behave like any other block-level element as well.
    – BoltClock
    Oct 21, 2012 at 8:49
  • 10
    So how should be fixed? By floating the container as Michel suggests? Apr 6, 2015 at 10:05
  • 1
    @Daniel Albuschat: I'm honored!
    – BoltClock
    Oct 27, 2019 at 13:32
30

Based upon @BoltClock♦'s answer, I fixed it by zeroing the margin...
so

html,body, #st-full-pg {
   height: 100%;
   margin: 0;
}

works where id "st-full-pg" is assigned to a panel div (which further contained panel-heading and panel-body)

24

A bit late, but maybe it helps someone.

Adding float: left; to #container removes the scrollbar, as W3C says:

•Margins between a floated box and any other box do not collapse (not even between a float and its in-flow children).

11
html,body {
   height: 100%;
   margin: 0;
   overflow: hidden;
}

This worked for me

1
  • 3
    if you have a footer it removes it
    – Alexander
    Aug 6, 2018 at 18:49
4

adding float:left; is nice, but will interfere with central horizontal positioning using margin:auto;

if you know how big your margin is, you can account for that in your height percentage using calc:

height: calc(100% - 50px);

browser support is good, but only IE11+ https://caniuse.com/#feat=calc

3
  • Why 50px? Magic number. Jul 12, 2018 at 20:53
  • "if you know how big your margin is." I believe is what OP is referring to with the 50px
    – Clay
    Feb 15, 2019 at 23:20
  • Not good if you're supporting mobile devices
    – Eesa
    Sep 15, 2021 at 19:32
3
/*removes default margin & padding*/
html, body{
    padding: 0px !important;
    margin: 0px !important;
}

/*sets body height to max; and allows scrollbar as page content grows*/
body{
    min-height: 100vh;
}
1
  • 100vh on body will show a scrollbar when you get overflow in x direction. So it is better to set html and body to 100% height and do not use 100vh at all
    – juliushuck
    May 25, 2022 at 22:54
2

For those who are coming here for an easier to understand answer that even includes code samples, this answer (copied from here) is for you.

No JavaScript or definite pixel values (such as 100px) are required, just, pure CSS and percentages.

If your div is just sitting there on its own, height: 50% will mean 50% the height of the body. Normally, the height of the body is zero without any visible content, so 50% of that is just, well, zero.

This is the solution (based on this) (uncomment the background lines to get a visualisation of the padding):

/* Makes <html> take up the full page without requiring content to stretch it to that height. */

html
{
  height: 100%;
  
  /* background: green; */
}

body
{
  /*
    100% the height of <html> minus 1 multiple of the total extra height from the padding of <html>.
    This prevents an unnecessary vertical scrollbar from appearing.
  */
  height: calc(100% - 1em);
  
  /* background: blue; */
}

/* In most cases it's better to use stylesheets instead of inline-CSS. */
div
{
  width: 50%;
  height: 50%;
  
  background: red;
}
<div></div>

The above was written so that there would still be the usual padding. You could set the dimensions of the red div to 100% and still see padding on each side/end. If you don't want this padding, use this (although it doesn't look nice, I recommend you stick with the first example):

/* Makes <html> take up the full page without requiring content to stretch it to that height. */

html, body
{
  height: 100%;
}

/* You can uncomment it but you wouldn't be able to see it anyway. */

/*
html
{
  background: green;
}
*/

body
{
  margin: 0;
  
 /* background: blue; */
}

/* In most cases it's better to use stylesheets instead of inline-CSS */
div
{
  width: 50%;
  height: 50%;
  
  background: red;
}
<div></div>

1

I have found a solution: add padding: 1px 0; to body prevents vertical scrollbars to appear

1

I have the same issue. The reason was in the style

border: 1px solid red;

Once I removed it the problem disappeared

0

I saw this problem fixed before where you put all the contents of body in a div called wrap. Wrap's style should be set to position: relative; min-height: 100%;. To position #container div 50px from the top and left put a div inside wrap with a padding set to 50px. Margins will not work with wrap and the div we just made, but they will work in #container and everything inside it.

here's my fix on jsfiddle.

0

you can add non-breaking space into the body tag.

<body> &nbsp; <othertags>...</body>
-1
html, body {
    height: 100%;
    overflow: hidden;
}

If you want to remove the body scrolling add the following style:

body {
    height: 100%;
    overflow: hidden;
}
1
  • This fixed my issue where I was having 2 vertical scroll bars. Setting html to have overflow: hidden and leaving body alone fixed that. Both my body and html have height: 100%.
    – Karai17
    Oct 19, 2017 at 18:03
-1

Inspired by @BoltClock, I tried this and it worked, even when zoom out and in.

Browser: Chrome 51

html{
  height: 100%;
}
body{
  height: 100%;
  margin: 0px;
  position: relative;
  top: -20px;
}

I guess body was shifted down 20px.

-1

It works for me:

html,
body {
    height: 100%;
    height: -webkit-fill-available; // Chrome
}

// Firefox
@-moz-document url-prefix() {
    body {
        box-sizing: border-box; 
        margin: 0;
        padding: 1px;
    }
}
-3

Add overflow: hidden; to html and body.

html, body {
  height: 100%;
  overflow: hidden;
}
2
  • 43
    this solution removes scrollbar completely. even on the pages where scroll is needed
    – Vildan
    Jan 13, 2016 at 21:17
  • Also in mobile devices this may create problems, the page will be scrolled when filling forms and everything will be moved from some px.
    – user3672754
    May 4, 2021 at 12:44
-10

I found a quick solution: try set height to 99.99% instead of 100%

1
  • There are many reasons why this is a terrible idea, including arbitrary height differences per user window, and that internal rounding methods differ by browser. Oct 9, 2015 at 3:22

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