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Possible Duplicate:
Compiler complains about “missing return statement” even though it is impossible to reach condition where return statement would be missing

The following method in Java compiles fine.

public String temp() {
    while(true) {
        if(true) {
            // Do something.
        }
    }
}

The method has an explicit return type which is java.lang.String with no return statement though it compiles fine. The following method however fails to compile.

public String tempNew() {
    if(true) {
        return "someString";
    }        
}

A compile-time error is issued indicating "missing return statement" even though the condition specified with the if statement is always true (it has a boolean constant that is never going to be changed neither by reflection). The method must be modified something like the following for its successful compilation.

public String tempNew() {
    if(true) {
        return "someString";
    } else {
        return "someString";
    }
}

or

public String tempNew() {
    if(true) {
        return "someString";
    }

    return "someString";
}

Regarding the first case with the while loop, the second case appears to be legal though it fails to compile.

Is there a reason in the second case beyond one of the compiler's features.

4
  • 2
    It's funny because (in the if (true) method) if you don't have an else clause it won't compile due to the missing return statement; but if you do, the compiler complains of dead code.
    – arshajii
    Oct 20, 2012 at 17:33
  • @A. R. S. - Is dead code warning issued by some IDE? I can't see with NetBeans.
    – Tiny
    Oct 20, 2012 at 18:06
  • @Tiny I received the warning in Eclipse, not sure for NetBeans though.
    – arshajii
    Oct 20, 2012 at 18:38
  • @A. R. S. - Thanks for the reply. I will try with Eclipse later.
    – Tiny
    Oct 20, 2012 at 18:51

2 Answers 2

3

Because it is dead code. The dead code analysis is done in a separate pass to the method return analysis, which does some more in-depth analysis that looks inside branch conditions.

2
  • Nice answer. It really recommend you to give some more explanation so that it will be helpful to others in future.
    – Abubakkar
    Oct 20, 2012 at 17:38
  • Is dead code warning issued by some IDE? I can't see with NetBeans.
    – Tiny
    Oct 20, 2012 at 18:05
1

From the java tutorial: You can implement an infinite loop using the while statement as follows:

while (true){
    // your code goes here
}

so the compiler knows this is infinite, and therefore may not return - ie not necessarily needing a return statement.

The if (true) line (on it's own), on the other hand will return and therefore needs to cover all returning branches.

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