457

I am working with images, and I ran across a problem with aspect ratios.

<img src="big_image.jpg" width="900" height="600" alt="" />

As you can see, height and width are already specified. I added CSS rule for images:

img {
  max-width:500px;
}

But for big_image.jpg, I receive width=500 and height=600. How I can set images to be re-sized, while keeping their aspect ratios.

17 Answers 17

649

img {
  display: block;
  max-width:230px;
  max-height:95px;
  width: auto;
  height: auto;
}
<p>This image is originally 400x400 pixels, but should get resized by the CSS:</p>
<img width="400" height="400" src="http://i.stack.imgur.com/aEEkn.png">

This will make image shrink if it's too big for specified area (as downside, it will not enlarge image).

  • 7
    Is there a version of this that will enlarge images to fit their container also? I've tried the max-width/max-height as numbers with width/height as auto, but as setec said above, it will not enlarge the image. I've tried using min-width/min-height also. I just can't get the combination right. I simply want that whatever image I have to put into this container, it will display at it's maximum size possible without changing aspect ratio regardless of whether that involves shrinking or growing the image to achieve that. – Dee2000 Apr 14 '14 at 21:10
  • 6
    Seems that display: block is no more needed. – actimel Jun 26 '14 at 9:18
  • 3
    Note that the question was about an <img> that itself includes a width and height and I think that means you need to use !important to circumvent the tag width/height info. – Alexis Wilke Jul 18 '14 at 1:28
  • 17
    @AlexisWilke CSS rules override html attributes. !important is not needed. – Jargs Nov 12 '14 at 23:45
  • 3
    Using it on Chrome, not working for me, even with !important – Ray Jan 2 '16 at 21:30
200

The solutions below will allow scaling up and scaling down of the image, depending on the parent box width.

All images have a parent container with a fixed width for demonstration purposes only. In production, this will be the width of the parent box.

Best Practice (2018):

This solution tells the browser to render the image with max available width and adjust the height as a percentage of that width.

.parent {
  width: 100px;
}

img {
  display: block;
  width: 100%;
  height: auto;
}
<p>This image is originally 400x400 pixels, but should get resized by the CSS:</p>
<div class="parent">
  <img width="400" height="400" src="https://placehold.it/400x400">
</div>

Fancier Solution:

With the fancier solution, you'll be able to crop the image regardless of its size and add a background color to compensate for the cropping.

.parent {
  width: 100px;
}

.container {
  display: block;
  width: 100%;
  height: auto;
  position: relative;
  overflow: hidden;
  padding: 34.37% 0 0 0; /* 34.37% = 100 / (w / h) = 100 / (640 / 220) */
}

.container img {
  display: block;
  max-width: 100%;
  max-height: 100%;
  position: absolute;
  top: 0;
  bottom: 0;
  left: 0;
  right: 0;
}
<p>This image is originally 640x220, but should get resized by the CSS:</p>
<div class="parent">
  <div class="container">
    <img width="640" height="220" src="https://placehold.it/640x220">
  </div>
</div>

For the line specifying padding, you need to calculate the aspect ratio of the image, for example:

640px (w) = 100%
220px (h) = ?

640/220 = 2.909
100/2.909 = 34.37%

So, top padding = 34.37%.

  • It working, but should be max-width:100% instead of width in most of uses. – Dudeist Sep 1 '14 at 23:33
  • I don't think !important is needed here. – Flimm Mar 2 '16 at 14:27
  • 1
    With the parent set to 100px. How will this work responsively? – Remi Mar 22 '16 at 12:20
  • @Remi that's for demonstration purposes. I've added a clarification to the top of the answer. – Aternus Dec 4 '16 at 16:04
  • @Flimm it was used previously for compatibility issues, in 2016 this is no longer needed. – Aternus Dec 5 '16 at 8:25
174

I've struggled with this problem quite hard, and eventually arrived at this simple solution:

object-fit: cover;
width: 100%;
height: 250px;

You can adjust the width and height to fit your needs, and the object-fit property will do the cropping for you.

Cheers.

  • 26
    object-fit is fantastic, great tip! There are some fine polyfill libraries if anyone is wondering about IE compatibility. – sofly Oct 11 '16 at 5:57
  • 3
    Lovely, bear in mind this does not work for IE though – guival Oct 25 '17 at 11:04
  • 1
    Not viable on SAMSUNG Signage Display WebApps. – Mär Aug 1 '18 at 8:50
  • 1
    Best solution available – Cynthia Sanchez Aug 10 '18 at 13:32
  • 1
    You can also use object-fit: contain and specify a width or height! – Broper Dec 2 '18 at 20:25
61

The background-size property is ie>=9 only, but if that is fine with you, you can use a div with background-image and set background-size: contain:

div.image{
    background-image: url("your/url/here");
    background-size: contain;
    background-repeat: no-repeat;
    background-position: center;
}

Now you can just set your div size to whatever you want and not only will the image keep its aspect ratio it will also be centralized both vertically and horizontally within the div. Just don't forget to set the sizes on the css since divs don't have the width/height attribute on the tag itself.

This approach is different than setecs answer, using this the image area will be constant and defined by you (leaving empty spaces either horizontally or vertically depending on the div size and image aspect ratio), while setecs answer will get you a box that exactly the size of the scaled image (without empty spaces).

Edit: According to the MDN background-size documentation you can simulate the background-size property in IE8 using a proprietary filter declaration:

Though Internet Explorer 8 doesn't support the background-size property, it is possible to emulate some of its functionality using the non-standard -ms-filter function:

-ms-filter: "progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.AlphaImageLoader(src='path_relative_to_the_HTML_file', sizingMethod='scale')";
  • 2
    finally a CSS only solution to maximize a image while keeping its aspect ratio, thank you. Lucky that IE prior to 9 is increasingly unimportant. – humanityANDpeace Sep 22 '13 at 5:27
  • Great solution, thanks! Also note that you can replace 'contain' by 'cover' if you want to fill the div completely and crop extra pixels that doesn't fit the ratio – mbritto Nov 2 '15 at 9:31
  • This should be the correct answer. I love this solution. It keeps your proportions and is easy to understand. – skolind Dec 27 '17 at 8:32
  • While this is a correct answer programmatically, if an image "matters" this way you have no img attributes so you are killing SEO. – fat_mike Oct 11 '18 at 14:57
29

Very similar to some answers here, but in my case I had images that sometimes were taller, sometimes larger.

This style worked like a charm to make sure that all images use all available space, keep the ratio and not cuts:

.img {
   object-fit: contain;
   max-width: 100%;
   max-height: 100%;
   width: auto;
   height: auto;
}
17

Remove the "height" property.

<img src="big_image.jpg" width="900" alt=""/>

By specifying both you are changing the aspect ratio of the image. Just setting one will resize but preserve the aspect ratio.

Optionally, to restrict oversizings:

<img src="big_image.jpg" width="900" alt="" style="max-width:500px; height:auto; max-height:600px;"/>
  • i can't do it to all images - there are many images already placed in many html files – moonvader Oct 20 '12 at 18:32
  • 2
    Ok. try img {max-width:500px; height:auto; max-height:600px;} – el Dude Oct 20 '12 at 18:40
  • 1
    Useful information like that comment should be added to your post. That way we can immediately see what you've come up with. – Bram Vanroy May 30 '13 at 13:52
  • The downside of omitting the height attribute in the img tag is that the browser cannot calculate how much space the image will take up before downloading the image. This make the page slower to render and it can lead to more "jumping". – Flimm Mar 2 '16 at 14:03
10

Just add this to your css, It will automaticly shrink and expand with keeping the original ratio.

img {
    display: block;
    max-width: 100%;
    max-height: 100%;
    width: auto;
    height: auto;
}
  • This is the same answer as setec's answer, except using 100% instead of a specific pixel value. – Flimm Mar 2 '16 at 14:29
  • 2
    display: block; is unnecessary. – Flimm Mar 2 '16 at 14:34
  • That's perfect and works with images of any size and proportion – Le Droid Aug 30 '16 at 17:21
7

There is no standard way to preserve aspect ratio for images with width, height and max-width specified together.

So we are forced either to specify width and height to prevent page “jumps” during loading images, or to use max-width and not specify dimensions for images.

Specifying just width (without height) typically makes not much sense, but you can try to override the height HTML-attribute by adding a rule like IMG {height: auto; } into your stylesheet.

See also the related Firefox bug 392261.

  • thank you it works in modern versions of IE, Opera, FF and Chrome. i need some time to test it with other browsers. – moonvader Oct 20 '12 at 18:39
  • 6
    Don't use !important in CSS. It is a hack that will eventually come back to haunt you. – Automatico Apr 28 '13 at 8:05
  • 1
    You don't even need !important here. – Flimm Mar 2 '16 at 14:28
5

Set the CSS class of your image container tag to image-class:

<div class="image-full"></div>

and add this you your CSS stylesheet.

.image-full {
    background: url(...some image...) no-repeat;
    background-size: cover;
    background-position: center center;
}
5

To maintain a responsive image while still enforcing the image to have a certain aspect ratio you can do the following:

HTML:

<div class="ratio2-1">
   <img src="../image.png" alt="image">
</div>

And SCSS:

.ratio2-1 {
  overflow: hidden;
  position: relative;

  &:before {
    content: '';
    display: block;
    padding-top: 50%; // ratio 2:1
  }

  img {
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    left: 0;
    bottom: 0;
    right: 0;
  }
}

This can be used to enforce a certain aspect ratio, regardless of the size of the image that authors upload.

Thanks to @Kseso at http://codepen.io/Kseso/pen/bfdhg. Check this URL for more ratios and a working example.

  • I like this as it works with circles / border-radius. But unfortunately, it crops the image and doesn't do so well with making a border for the image in the div as far as I've tried. – Jake Apr 8 at 12:56
5

https://jsfiddle.net/sot2qgj6/3/

Here is the answer if you want to put image with fixed percentage of width, but not fixed pixel of width.

And this will be useful when dealing with different size of screen.

The tricks are

  1. Using padding-top to set the height from width.
  2. Using position: absolute to put image in the padding space.
  3. Using max-height and max-width to make sure the image will not over the parent element.
  4. using display:block and margin: auto to center the image.

I've also comment most of the tricks inside the fiddle.


I also find some other ways to make this happen. There will be no real image in html, so I personly perfer the top answer when I need "img" element in html.

simple css by using background http://jsfiddle.net/4660s79h/2/

background-image with word on top http://jsfiddle.net/4660s79h/1/

the concept to use position absolute is from here http://www.w3schools.com/howto/howto_css_aspect_ratio.asp

4

To force image that fit in a exact size, you don't need to write too many codes. It's so simple

img{
    width: 200px;
    height: auto;
    object-fit: contain; /* Fit logo in the image size */
        -o-object-fit: contain; /* Fit logo fro opera browser */
    object-position: top; /* Set logo position */
        -o-object-position: top; /* Logo position for opera browser */
    }
<img src="http://cdn.sstatic.net/Sites/stackoverflow/company/img/logos/so/so-logo.png" alt="Logo">

2

You can create a div like this:

<div class="image" style="background-image:url('/to/your/image')"></div>

And use this css to style it:

height: 100%;
width: 100%;
background-position: center center;
background-repeat: no-repeat;
background-size: contain; // this can also be cover
  • This will stretch the div to 100% width of it's parent, but not maintain the aspect ratio of the image. – David Ball Mar 8 '15 at 14:36
  • Did you try it? I got it work jsfiddle.net/zuysj22w. Can you show your case? @DavidBall – Chun Yang Mar 10 '15 at 0:54
  • This is a similar solution to Hoffmann's answer. – Flimm Mar 2 '16 at 14:32
2

You can use this:

img { 
    width: 500px; 
    height: 600px; 
    object-fit: contain; 
    position: relative; 
    top: 50%; 
    transform: translateY(-50%); 
}
1

This will make image shrink if it's too big for specified area (as downside, it will not enlarge image).

The solution by setec is fine for "Shrink to Fit" in auto mode. But, to optimally EXPAND to fit in 'auto' mode, you need to first put the received image into a temp id, Check if it can be expanded in height or in width (depending upon its aspect ration v/s the aspect ratio of your display block),

$(".temp_image").attr("src","str.jpg" ).load(function() { 
    // callback to get actual size of received image 

    // define to expand image in Height 
    if(($(".temp_image").height() / $(".temp_image").width()) > display_aspect_ratio ) {
        $(".image").css('height', max_height_of_box);
        $(".image").css('width',' auto');
    } else { 
        // define to expand image in Width
        $(".image").css('width' ,max_width_of_box);
        $(".image").css('height','auto');
    }
    //Finally put the image to Completely Fill the display area while maintaining aspect ratio.
    $(".image").attr("src","str.jpg");
});

This approach is useful when received images are smaller than display box. You must save them on your server in Original Small size rather than their expanded version to fill your Bigger display Box to save on size and bandwidth.

  • Although the question post didn't spell it out, I think OP strongly implied he/she was looking for a CSS-only solution. – Flimm Mar 2 '16 at 14:31
0

img {
  max-width: 80px; /* Also works with percentage value like 100% */
  height: auto;
}
<p>This image is originally 400x400 pixels, but should get resized by the CSS:</p>
<img width="400" height="400" src="https://i.stack.imgur.com/aEEkn.png">

<p>Let's say the author of the HTML deliberately wants
  the height to be half the value of the width,
  this CSS will ignore the HTML author's wishes, which may or may not be what you want:
</p>
<img width="400" height="200" src="https://i.stack.imgur.com/aEEkn.png">

0

How about using a pseudo element for vertical alignment? This less code is for a carousel but i guess it works on every fixed size container. It will keep the aspect ratio and insert @gray-dark bars on top/bottom or left/write for the shortest dimension. In the meanwhile the image is centered horizontally by the text-align and vertically by the pseudo element.

    > li {
      float: left;
      overflow: hidden;
      background-color: @gray-dark;
      text-align: center;

      > a img,
      > img {
        display: inline-block;
        max-height: 100%;
        max-width: 100%;
        width: auto;
        height: auto;
        margin: auto;
        text-align: center;
      }

      // Add pseudo element for vertical alignment of inline (img)
      &:before {
        content: "";
        height: 100%;
        display: inline-block;
        vertical-align: middle;
      }
    }

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