31

I am trying to understand Adapter pattern and its use in real world. After going through various articles on internet and www.dofactory.com, I created this sample code. I just want to know whether my understanding is correct. In the example below I have created MSDAO object in the Adaptor class. Later I changed it to OracleDAO.

class Client
{
  static void Main(string[] args)
  {
    ITarget objAdapter = new Adapter();
    object dummyObject = objAdapter.GetData();
  }
}

Interface ITarget
{
  public void GetData();
}

//Decision to use MSDAO

class Adapter : ITarget
{
  public void GetData()
  {
    MSDAO objmsdao = new MSDAO();
    objmsdao.GetData();
  }
}

//After a month, the decision to use OracaleDAO was taken, so the code change

class Adapter : ITarget
{
  public void GetData()
  {
    OracleDAO objoracledao = new OracleDAO();
    objoracledao.GetData();
  }
}
1
  • tnx to Ian Boyd for his real example, another great example is DbContext in ef6,it implement IObjectContextAdapter interface to provide access to the underlying ObjectContext.
    – AminM
    Jul 19, 2021 at 10:51

5 Answers 5

87

Generally the adapter pattern transforms one interface into another, but it can simply wrap the behavior to isolate your class from the underlying implementation. In your case, you are using an adapter, but you could just as easily have defined the DAO objects to simply implement the interface and programmed against the interface. The adapter pattern is usually used when you don't have control over the target class. My primary use of the adapter pattern would be to create wrappers for a framework class that doesn't implement an interface.

Say I want to mock out a framework class which doesn't implement an interface (and doesn't have virtual methods). With many mocking apis this is hard or impossible to do. What I will do, then, is define my own interface as a subset of the signature of the class I'm targeting. I implement a wrapper class that implements this interface and simply delegates the calls to the wrapped framework class. This wrapper class works as an adapter for the framework class. My classes use this adapter instead of the framework class, but get the framework class' behavior.

 public interface IFoo
 {
     void Bar();
 }

 public class FooWrapper : IFoo
 {
      private FrameworkFoo Foo { get; set; }

      public FooWrapper( FrameworkFoo foo )
      {
           this.Foo = foo;
      }

      public void Bar()
      {
           this.Foo.Bar();
      }
 }

Consider also the case where you have a couple of different classes that have basically the same functionality, but different signatures and you want to be able to use them interchangeably. If you can't transform these (or don't want to for other reasons), you may want to write an adapter class that defines a common interface and translates between that interface's methods and the methods available on the target classes.

Framework classes:

public class TargetA
{
    public void Start() { ... }
    public void End() { ... }
}

public class TargetB
{
    public void Begin() { ... }
    public void Terminate() { ... }
}

An adapter for them

public interface ITargetAdapter
{
    void Open();
    void Close();
}

public class AdapterA : ITargetAdapter
{
     private TargetA A { get; set; }

     public AdapterA( TargetA a )
     {
           this.A = a;
     }

     public void Open() { this.A.Start(); }
     public void Close() { this.A.End(); }
}

public class AdapterB : ITargetAdapter
{
     private TargetB B { get; set; }

     public AdapterB( TargetB a )
     {
           this.B = a;
     }

     public void Open() { this.B.Begin(); }
     public void Close() { this.B.Terminate(); }
}

Then used as:

ITargetAdapter adapter = new AdapterA( new TargetA() );
adapter.Open();
adapter.Close();     
5
  • In your example, you have wrapped your framework class with a class that implements an Interface. I have understood this, but can you clarify how you have "transformed one interface to another? thanks.
    – pradeeptp
    Aug 19, 2009 at 11:18
  • In this case, the interface technically didn't exist before. It's sort of a degenerate case in that you're actually just creating an interface for a class that didn't have one. The second example (just added) demonstrates this better.
    – tvanfosson
    Aug 19, 2009 at 11:27
  • @pradeeptp, "interface" in the context of the adapter pattern doesn't necessarily imply and explicitly declared interface but rather the "definition" of the class/api you'd like to adapt/transform. Jun 18, 2014 at 7:04
  • 4
    The key word here is wrapper which helps me understand this pattern.
    – Jess
    Mar 7, 2016 at 17:52
  • Great answer in simple words. Feb 25, 2017 at 21:16
4
internal class Program
{
    private static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        // When in foreign countries, and you want to say hello
        // just say "hello" and then 
        // the appropriate non-English response comes out 

        // When in Japan:
        var translator = new JapaneseTranslator(new JapaneseSpeaker());
        EnglishMan freddie = new EnglishMan(translator);

        // Freddie greets Tokyo, though he doesn't know a word of Japanese
        Console.WriteLine(freddie.Greetings()); //  "teo torriatte!"

        // when in France:
        ITarget translator2 = new FrenchTranslator(new FrenchSpeaker());
        EnglishMan brian = new EnglishMan(translator2);

        // Brian greets the crowd in Paris, though he doesn't know a word in French
        Console.WriteLine(brian.Greetings()); 
          // "So très charmant my dear! Bonjour"

        // alternatively, the translators can also do the greeting:
        Console.WriteLine(translator.Greetings());  //  "Konichiwa, hisashiburi!"
        Console.WriteLine(translator2.Greetings()); // "Bonjour!"
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// This is the client.
    /// </summary>
    public class EnglishMan : ITarget
    {
        private ITarget target;

        public EnglishMan(ITarget target)
        {
            this.target = target;
        }

        public string Greetings()
        {
            return target.Greetings();
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// The target interface
    /// </summary>
    public interface ITarget
    {
        string Greetings();
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// This is the adaptor
    /// </summary>
    public class JapaneseTranslator : ITarget
    {
        private JapaneseSpeaker japanese;

        public JapaneseTranslator(JapaneseSpeaker japanese)
        {
            this.japanese = japanese;
        }

        public string Greetings()
        {
            return japanese.Konnichiwa();
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// This is the adaptee
    /// </summary>
    public class JapaneseSpeaker
    {
        public JapaneseSpeaker()
        {
        }

        public string Konnichiwa()
        {
            return "Konichiwa, hisashiburi!";
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// This is the adaptor
    /// </summary>
    public class FrenchTranslator : ITarget
    {
        private FrenchSpeaker french;

        public FrenchTranslator(FrenchSpeaker french)
        {
            this.french = french;
        }

        public string Greetings()
        {
            return french.Bonjour();
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// This is the adaptee
    /// </summary>
    public class FrenchSpeaker
    {
        public string Bonjour()
        {
            return "Bonjour!!";
        }
    }
}
3
  • 1
    Im just looking at this example and what I don't understand is, why does "JapaneseTranslator" or "FrenchTranslator" need to have the class they are tied to (the class they are adapting) passed in as a parameter in the constructor. If it always has a Japanese speaker reference and doesn't "Adapt" to any other type - just have an instance directly inside?
    – Rob McCabe
    Aug 26, 2018 at 10:42
  • 1
    @RobMcCabe - excellent point. In software, as a general principle, unless you had a very good reason, you would not have a "frenchTranslator" because that class would only be useful if you were translating to french. Instead you would have a generic 'translator' class. That way, it's more useful: you can translate to any language, provided you pass in the correct language you want to 'adapt'. Such a practice of passing in the things you need makes for more loosely coupled classes. the above example is purely used to explain the concept, and is not illustrative of a loosely coupled design.
    – BenKoshy
    Aug 27, 2018 at 3:03
  • @RobMcCabe I will redo this so it makes more sense. it seems to be confusing too many people.
    – BenKoshy
    Jun 13 at 23:39
3

A canonical example inside the .NET framework exists in the System.Drawing.Bitmap class.

This Bitmap has a constructor that lets you load an image from a Stream:

public Bitmap(
    Stream stream
)

what you don't know, is that internally the .NET Bitmap class is a wrapper around the GDI+ Bitmap class, and its constructor that takes an IStream:

Bitmap(
  [in]  IStream *stream,
  [in]  BOOL useIcm
);

So in the C# world, when i call:

new Bitmap(stream);

it has to turn around and call:

IStream stm;
IntPtr gpBitmap;
GdipCreateBitmapFromStream(stm, out gpBitmap);

The question is how to present a .NET Stream object to a method that expects a COM IStream interface.

Hence the internal GPStream class:

internal class GPStream : IStream
{
   GPStream(Stream stream) { ... }
}

You need to present an IStream interface to your Stream object:

IStream                                     Stream
=======================================     =====================================
int Read(IntPtr buf, int len);          --> int Read(byte[] buffer, int offset, int count)
int Write(IntPtr buf, int len);         --> void Write(byte[] buffer, int offset, int count);
long Seek(long dlibMove, int dwOrigin); --> long Seek(long offset, SeekOrigin orgin)
...                                         ...

So now you have an adapter:

enter image description here

And the code is something like:

IStream stm = new GPStream(stream); //adapter to convert Stream --> IStream
IntPtr gpBitmap;

GdipCreateBitmapFromStream(stm, out gpBitmap);
0

A very simple example...

 interface ITarget
    {
      List<string> GetProducts();
    }


    public class VendorAdaptee
    {
       public List<string> GetListOfProducts()
       {
          List<string> products = new List<string>();
          products.Add("Gaming Consoles");
          products.Add("Television");
          products.Add("Books");
          products.Add("Musical Instruments");
          return products;
       }
    }


    class VendorAdapter:ITarget
    {
       public List<string> GetProducts()
       {
          VendorAdaptee adaptee = new VendorAdaptee();
          return adaptee.GetListOfProducts();
       }
    }


    class ShoppingPortalClient
    {
       static void Main(string[] args)
       {
          ITarget adapter = new  VendorAdapter();
          foreach (string product in adapter.GetProducts())
          {
            Console.WriteLine(product);
          }
          Console.ReadLine();
       }
    }
0

I’ll keep it very simple. What if one caller wants to call the GetData method of MSDAO and other caller wants OracleDAO. Or in future other class can also be added.

In that case your solution will not work.

So I would suggest to declare the GetData method as virtual of the adaptee class. Add a new adapter class, extend the adaptee class and implement your ITarget interface and implement the GetData (declare it override) method accordingly.

Repeat the above step if you will have new class in future.

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