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A lot of open source projects like spring consist of multiple modules, when adding those modules as dependencies in maven should I explicitly defined every dependency or just let the transitive dependency management do its thing. For example which of the two cases below is a best practice.

case 1: Include the highest level features that I want

    <dependency>
        <groupId>org.springframework</groupId>
        <artifactId>spring-webmvc</artifactId>
        <version>3.1.2.RELEASE</version>
    </dependency>

case 2: Include each part of the framework as an explicit dependency

    <dependency>
        <groupId>org.springframework</groupId>
        <artifactId>spring-core</artifactId>
        <version>3.1.2.RELEASE</version>
    </dependency>
    <dependency>
        <groupId>org.springframework</groupId>
        <artifactId>spring-context</artifactId>
        <version>3.1.2.RELEASE</version>
    </dependency>
            .... other dependencies that are transitively resolved by maven
    <dependency>
        <groupId>org.springframework</groupId>
        <artifactId>spring-webmvc</artifactId>
        <version>3.1.2.RELEASE</version>
    </dependency>

Which is the best practice case 1 or case 2 and why?

0

2 Answers 2

5

It depends on if you are declaring any other dependencies that use the same dependencies (in this case, Spring). If all you need is the top-level dependency, declare that. If you are using other dependencies that rely on specific versions of a transitive dependency, declare that as an explicit dependency.

Using Spring as an example: If you declare spring-webmvc and then later decide you need another spring package, say spring-security, it may be a good idea to explicitly define any shared dependencies that they both rely on, just so you know which version is being included with your project.

Basically, declare anything that you need a specific version of and let maven take care of the rest until you either need to exclude versions or declare specific versions. This is what maven is built to do, so let it manage the dependencies until it makes a wrong decision.

1
  • The wish the common open source java projects did not go crazy with their breaking of things into too many modules. Only to need to include all these modules anyway into your application, because everything needs them anyway.
    – ams
    Commented Oct 21, 2012 at 16:18
1

I think #1 is better, since from the official docs it is clear that spring-webmvc is dependent on which all spring modules.

<!--
    Spring MVC for Servlet Environments (depends on spring-core, spring-beans, spring-context, spring-web)
    Define this if you use Spring MVC with a Servlet Container such as Apache Tomcat (org.springframework.web.servlet.*)
-->
<dependency>
  <groupId>org.springframework</groupId>
  <artifactId>spring-webmvc</artifactId>
  <version>${org.springframework.version}</version>
</dependency>

You can also take a look at the pom to see that all the dependencies for spring-webmvc depend on the same version as it is on.

Therefore I don't see any need for declaring them explicitly in your pom, at least for this use case.

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