25

I have a line segment (great circle part) on earth. The line segment is defined by the coordinates of its ends. Obviously, two points define two line segments, so assume I am interested in the shorter one.

I am given a third point, and I am looking for the (shortest) distance between the line and the point.

All the coordinates are given in longitude\latitude (WGS 84).

How do I calculate the distance?

A solution in any reasonable programming language will do.

  • 2
    Bare in mind that the Earth, and WGS84 system designed to approximate it, is not a sphere - so calculations based on that assumption my in inaccurate – John Sibly Aug 19 '09 at 12:40
  • 7
    I don't know why anyone would assume homework...I deal with points on a spherical approximation of the Earth at work. In fact, it was a previous mini-project of mine... – Thomas Owens Aug 19 '09 at 12:45
  • 1
    I sometimes wish I were still at the homework stage. This however is entirely work. Home is still about two hours away. – daphshez Aug 19 '09 at 13:08
  • 2
    Kinda insulting comment about homework. One would need at least 2 or 3 semesters of math major curriculum from a top-notch university to handle this. Maybe Lazarus graduated from MIT by the age 20? – azheglov Aug 19 '09 at 13:59
  • For shorter distance do simplification, see: stackoverflow.com/questions/20231258/… – Martin Koubek Oct 26 '15 at 9:57
18

Here's my own solution, based on the idea in ask Dr. Math. I'd be happy to see your feedback.

Disclaimer first. This solution is correct for spheres. Earth isn't a sphere, and the coordinates system (WGS 84) doesn't assume it's a sphere. So this is just an approximation, and I can't really estimate is error. Also, for very small distances, it's probably also possible to get good approximation by assuming everything is a just a coplanar. Again I don't know how "small" the distances have to be.

Now to business. I will call the ends of the lines A,B and the third point C. Basically, the algorithm is to:

  1. convert the coordinates first to Cartesian coordinates (with the origin at the center of earth) - e.g. here.
  2. Calculate T, the point on the line AB that is nearest to C, using the following 3 vector products:

    G = A x B

    F = C x G

    T = G x F

  3. Normalize T and multiply by the radius of earth.

  4. Convert T back to longitude\latitude.
  5. Calculate the distance between T and C - e.g. here.

These steps are enough if you are looking for the distance between C and the great circle defined by A and B. If like me you are interested in the distance between C and the shorter line segment, you need to take the extra step of verifying that T is indeed on this segment. If it isn't, then necessarily the nearest point is one of the ends A or B - the easiest way is to check which one.

In general terms, the idea behind the three vector products is the following. The first one (G) gives us the the plane of the great circle of A and B (so the plane containing A,B and the origin). The second (F) gives us the great circle the goes through C and is perpendicular to the G. Then T is the intersection of the great circles defined by F and G, brought to the correct length by normalization and multiplication by R.

Here's some partial Java code for doing it.

Finding the nearest point on the great circle. The inputs and output are length-2 arrays. The intermediate arrays are of length 3.

double[] nearestPointGreatCircle(double[] a, double[] b, double c[])
{
    double[] a_ = toCartsian(a);
    double[] b_ = toCartsian(b);
    double[] c_ = toCartsian(c);

    double[] G = vectorProduct(a_, b_);
    double[] F = vectorProduct(c_, G);
    double[] t = vectorProduct(G, F);
    normalize(t);
    multiplyByScalar(t, R_EARTH);
    return fromCartsian(t);
}

Finding the nearest point on the segment:

double[] nearestPointSegment (double[] a, double[] b, double[] c)
{
   double[] t= nearestPointGreatCircle(a,b,c);
   if (onSegment(a,b,t))
     return t;
   return (distance(a,c) < distance(b,c)) ? a : c;
} 

This is a simple method of testing if point T, which we know is on the same great circle as A and B, is on the shorter segment of this great circle. However there are more efficient methods to do it:

   boolean onSegment (double[] a, double[] b, double[] t)
   {
     // should be   return distance(a,t)+distance(b,t)==distance(a,b), 
     // but due to rounding errors, we use: 
     return Math.abs(distance(a,b)-distance(a,t)-distance(b,t)) < PRECISION;
   }    
  • 1
    Looks good. I would also first normalize a_, b_ and c_, so that everything is on the unit ball instead of on earth. This way vector products still give you unit vectors, and you only have to multiply by the earth's radius to get the correctly-scaled values of t and the distance. Also, I believe it easier to find distances in Cartesian coordinates (using Pythagoras' theorem) than finding distances between longitude-latitude points. – Yuval F Aug 20 '09 at 18:51
  • Thanks, exactly what I needed. The T is on Minor Arc segment code was what I was missing. Dave. – daveD Aug 16 '12 at 9:56
  • 3
    It appears to me that the line "return (distance(a,c) < distance(b,c)) ? a : c;" should be "return (distance(a,c) < distance(b,c)) ? a : b;" – aez Aug 26 '12 at 1:54
  • 2
    i wish there are example with simple numbers – Azam Nov 26 '13 at 23:31
  • An alternative approach to determine whether T is on the path from A to B: Assume A,B,T are 3d vectors and they all lie in a plane(This is guaranteed by the construction of T). T is between A and B if and only if (AT > AB and BT > AB). Here * is the dot-product. Motivation: AT is the cosine of the angle between A and T. The angle between A and T needs to be smaller than the angle between A and B. Since the cosine is monotonically decreasing from 0 to Pi this translates to AT > AB. The relation BT > A*B is motivated similarly. – thomasfermi May 9 '18 at 16:48
3

Try Distance from a Point to a Great Circle, from Ask Dr. Math. You still need to transform the longitude/latitude to spherical coordinates and scale for the earth's radius, but this seems like a good direction.

1

This is complete code for accepted answer as ideone fiddle (found here):

import java.util.*;
import java.lang.*;
import java.io.*;

/* Name of the class has to be "Main" only if the class is public. */
class Ideone
{



    private static final double _eQuatorialEarthRadius = 6378.1370D;
    private static final double _d2r = (Math.PI / 180D);
    private static double PRECISION = 0.1;





    // Haversine Algorithm
    // source: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/365826/calculate-distance-between-2-gps-coordinates

    private static double HaversineInM(double lat1, double long1, double lat2, double long2) {
        return  (1000D * HaversineInKM(lat1, long1, lat2, long2));
    }

    private static double HaversineInKM(double lat1, double long1, double lat2, double long2) {
        double dlong = (long2 - long1) * _d2r;
        double dlat = (lat2 - lat1) * _d2r;
        double a = Math.pow(Math.sin(dlat / 2D), 2D) + Math.cos(lat1 * _d2r) * Math.cos(lat2 * _d2r)
                * Math.pow(Math.sin(dlong / 2D), 2D);
        double c = 2D * Math.atan2(Math.sqrt(a), Math.sqrt(1D - a));
        double d = _eQuatorialEarthRadius * c;
        return d;
    }

    // Distance between a point and a line

    public static void pointLineDistanceTest() {

        //line
        //double [] a = {50.174315,19.054743};
        //double [] b = {50.176019,19.065042};
        double [] a = {52.00118, 17.53933};
        double [] b = {52.00278, 17.54008};

        //point
        //double [] c = {50.184373,19.054657};
        double [] c = {52.008308, 17.542927};
        double[] nearestNode = nearestPointGreatCircle(a, b, c);
        System.out.println("nearest node: " + Double.toString(nearestNode[0]) + "," + Double.toString(nearestNode[1]));
        double result =  HaversineInM(c[0], c[1], nearestNode[0], nearestNode[1]);
        System.out.println("result: " + Double.toString(result));
    }

    // source: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1299567/how-to-calculate-distance-from-a-point-to-a-line-segment-on-a-sphere
    private static double[] nearestPointGreatCircle(double[] a, double[] b, double c[])
    {
        double[] a_ = toCartsian(a);
        double[] b_ = toCartsian(b);
        double[] c_ = toCartsian(c);

        double[] G = vectorProduct(a_, b_);
        double[] F = vectorProduct(c_, G);
        double[] t = vectorProduct(G, F);

        return fromCartsian(multiplyByScalar(normalize(t), _eQuatorialEarthRadius));
    }

    @SuppressWarnings("unused")
    private static double[] nearestPointSegment (double[] a, double[] b, double[] c)
    {
       double[] t= nearestPointGreatCircle(a,b,c);
       if (onSegment(a,b,t))
         return t;
       return (HaversineInKM(a[0], a[1], c[0], c[1]) < HaversineInKM(b[0], b[1], c[0], c[1])) ? a : b;
    }

     private static boolean onSegment (double[] a, double[] b, double[] t)
       {
         // should be   return distance(a,t)+distance(b,t)==distance(a,b), 
         // but due to rounding errors, we use: 
         return Math.abs(HaversineInKM(a[0], a[1], b[0], b[1])-HaversineInKM(a[0], a[1], t[0], t[1])-HaversineInKM(b[0], b[1], t[0], t[1])) < PRECISION;
       }


    // source: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1185408/converting-from-longitude-latitude-to-cartesian-coordinates
    private static double[] toCartsian(double[] coord) {
        double[] result = new double[3];
        result[0] = _eQuatorialEarthRadius * Math.cos(Math.toRadians(coord[0])) * Math.cos(Math.toRadians(coord[1]));
        result[1] = _eQuatorialEarthRadius * Math.cos(Math.toRadians(coord[0])) * Math.sin(Math.toRadians(coord[1]));
        result[2] = _eQuatorialEarthRadius * Math.sin(Math.toRadians(coord[0]));
        return result;
    }

    private static double[] fromCartsian(double[] coord){
        double[] result = new double[2];
        result[0] = Math.toDegrees(Math.asin(coord[2] / _eQuatorialEarthRadius));
        result[1] = Math.toDegrees(Math.atan2(coord[1], coord[0]));

        return result;
    }


    // Basic functions
    private static double[] vectorProduct (double[] a, double[] b){
        double[] result = new double[3];
        result[0] = a[1] * b[2] - a[2] * b[1];
        result[1] = a[2] * b[0] - a[0] * b[2];
        result[2] = a[0] * b[1] - a[1] * b[0];

        return result;
    }

    private static double[] normalize(double[] t) {
        double length = Math.sqrt((t[0] * t[0]) + (t[1] * t[1]) + (t[2] * t[2]));
        double[] result = new double[3];
        result[0] = t[0]/length;
        result[1] = t[1]/length;
        result[2] = t[2]/length;
        return result;
    }

    private static double[] multiplyByScalar(double[] normalize, double k) {
        double[] result = new double[3];
        result[0] = normalize[0]*k;
        result[1] = normalize[1]*k;
        result[2] = normalize[2]*k;
        return result;
    }

     public static void main(String []args){
        System.out.println("Hello World");
        Ideone.pointLineDistanceTest();

     }



}

It works fine for commented data:

//line
double [] a = {50.174315,19.054743};
double [] b = {50.176019,19.065042};
//point
double [] c = {50.184373,19.054657};

Nearest node is: 50.17493121381319,19.05846668493702

But I have problem with this data:

double [] a = {52.00118, 17.53933};
double [] b = {52.00278, 17.54008};
//point
double [] c = {52.008308, 17.542927};

Nearest node is: 52.00834987257176,17.542691313436357 which is wrong.

I think that line specified by two points is not a closed segment.

1

If someone needs it this is loleksy answer ported to c#

        private static double _eQuatorialEarthRadius = 6378.1370D;
        private static double _d2r = (Math.PI / 180D);
        private static double PRECISION = 0.1;

        // Haversine Algorithm
        // source: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/365826/calculate-distance-between-2-gps-coordinates

        private static double HaversineInM(double lat1, double long1, double lat2, double long2) {
            return  (1000D * HaversineInKM(lat1, long1, lat2, long2));
        }

        private static double HaversineInKM(double lat1, double long1, double lat2, double long2) {
            double dlong = (long2 - long1) * _d2r;
            double dlat = (lat2 - lat1) * _d2r;
            double a = Math.Pow(Math.Sin(dlat / 2D), 2D) + Math.Cos(lat1 * _d2r) * Math.Cos(lat2 * _d2r)
                    * Math.Pow(Math.Sin(dlong / 2D), 2D);
            double c = 2D * Math.Atan2(Math.Sqrt(a), Math.Sqrt(1D - a));
            double d = _eQuatorialEarthRadius * c;
            return d;
        }

        // Distance between a point and a line
        static double pointLineDistanceGEO(double[] a, double[] b, double[] c)
        {

            double[] nearestNode = nearestPointGreatCircle(a, b, c);
            double result = HaversineInKM(c[0], c[1], nearestNode[0], nearestNode[1]);

            return result;
        }

        // source: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1299567/how-to-calculate-distance-from-a-point-to-a-line-segment-on-a-sphere
        private static double[] nearestPointGreatCircle(double[] a, double[] b, double [] c)
        {
            double[] a_ = toCartsian(a);
            double[] b_ = toCartsian(b);
            double[] c_ = toCartsian(c);

            double[] G = vectorProduct(a_, b_);
            double[] F = vectorProduct(c_, G);
            double[] t = vectorProduct(G, F);

            return fromCartsian(multiplyByScalar(normalize(t), _eQuatorialEarthRadius));
        }

        private static double[] nearestPointSegment (double[] a, double[] b, double[] c)
        {
           double[] t= nearestPointGreatCircle(a,b,c);
           if (onSegment(a,b,t))
             return t;
           return (HaversineInKM(a[0], a[1], c[0], c[1]) < HaversineInKM(b[0], b[1], c[0], c[1])) ? a : b;
        }

         private static bool onSegment (double[] a, double[] b, double[] t)
           {
             // should be   return distance(a,t)+distance(b,t)==distance(a,b), 
             // but due to rounding errors, we use: 
             return Math.Abs(HaversineInKM(a[0], a[1], b[0], b[1])-HaversineInKM(a[0], a[1], t[0], t[1])-HaversineInKM(b[0], b[1], t[0], t[1])) < PRECISION;
           }


        // source: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1185408/converting-from-longitude-latitude-to-cartesian-coordinates
        private static double[] toCartsian(double[] coord) {
            double[] result = new double[3];
            result[0] = _eQuatorialEarthRadius * Math.Cos(deg2rad(coord[0])) * Math.Cos(deg2rad(coord[1]));
            result[1] = _eQuatorialEarthRadius * Math.Cos(deg2rad(coord[0])) * Math.Sin(deg2rad(coord[1]));
            result[2] = _eQuatorialEarthRadius * Math.Sin(deg2rad(coord[0]));
            return result;
        }

        private static double[] fromCartsian(double[] coord){
            double[] result = new double[2];
            result[0] = rad2deg(Math.Asin(coord[2] / _eQuatorialEarthRadius));
            result[1] = rad2deg(Math.Atan2(coord[1], coord[0]));

            return result;
        }


        // Basic functions
        private static double[] vectorProduct (double[] a, double[] b){
            double[] result = new double[3];
            result[0] = a[1] * b[2] - a[2] * b[1];
            result[1] = a[2] * b[0] - a[0] * b[2];
            result[2] = a[0] * b[1] - a[1] * b[0];

            return result;
        }

        private static double[] normalize(double[] t) {
            double length = Math.Sqrt((t[0] * t[0]) + (t[1] * t[1]) + (t[2] * t[2]));
            double[] result = new double[3];
            result[0] = t[0]/length;
            result[1] = t[1]/length;
            result[2] = t[2]/length;
            return result;
        }

        private static double[] multiplyByScalar(double[] normalize, double k) {
            double[] result = new double[3];
            result[0] = normalize[0]*k;
            result[1] = normalize[1]*k;
            result[2] = normalize[2]*k;
            return result;
        }
1

For distance up to a few thousands meters I would simplify the issue from sphere to plane. Then, the issue is pretty simply as a easy triangle calculation can be used:

We have points A and B and look for a distance X to line AB. Then:

Location a;
Location b;
Location x;

double ax = a.distanceTo(x);
double alfa = (Math.abs(a.bearingTo(b) - a.bearingTo(x))) / 180
            * Math.PI;
double distance = Math.sin(alfa) * ax;
0

The shortest distance between two points on a sphere is the smaller side of the great circle passing through the two points. I'm sure you know this already. There is a similar question here http://www.physicsforums.com/archive/index.php/t-178252.html that may help you model it mathmatically.

I'm not sure how likely you are to get a coded example of this, to be honest.

  • but the OP doesn't know the 2nd point. Point P1 = a point not on the great circle defined by the line segment, known. Point P2 = the nearest point to P1 on that great circle, not known. – Jason S Aug 19 '09 at 12:54
  • I understand that. I simply put the definition of the shortest distance between two points on a sphere, along with a link to somewhere asking the same question from a mathmatical point of view. I'm not suggesting an answer to the question :) – Jimmeh Aug 19 '09 at 13:02
0

I'm basically looking for the same thing right now, except that I strictly speaking don't care about having a segment of a great circle, but rather just want the distance to any point on the full circle.

Two links I am currently investigating:

This page mentions "Cross-track distance", which basically seems to be what you are looking for.

Also, in the following thread on the PostGIS mailing list, the attempt seems to (1) determine the closest point on the great circle with the same formula used for line-distance on a 2D-plane (with PostGIS' line_locate_point), and then (2) calculating the distance between that and the third point on a spheroid. I have no idea if mathematically step (1) is correct, but I would be surprised.

http://postgis.refractions.net/pipermail/postgis-users/2009-July/023903.html

Finally, I just saw that the following linked under "Related":

Distance from Point To Line great circle function not working right.

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