32

I'm looking for a way to find out if there are uncommited INSERT, UPDATE or DELETE statements in the current session. One way would be to check v$lock with the current sid, but that requires read access to v$lock, which is be a problem if the DBA doesn't want to grant it. Any other ways (other than keeping track of all database commands issued by the application)?

40

you can check if your session has a row in V$TRANSACTION (obviously that requires read privilege on this view):

SQL> SELECT COUNT(*)
       FROM v$transaction t, v$session s, v$mystat m
      WHERE t.ses_addr = s.saddr
        AND s.sid = m.sid
        AND ROWNUM = 1;

  COUNT(*)
----------
         0

SQL> insert into a values (1);

1 row inserted

SQL> SELECT COUNT(*)
       FROM v$transaction t, v$session s, v$mystat m
      WHERE t.ses_addr = s.saddr
        AND s.sid = m.sid
        AND ROWNUM = 1;

  COUNT(*)
----------
         1

SQL> commit;

Commit complete

SQL> SELECT COUNT(*)
       FROM v$transaction t, v$session s, v$mystat m
      WHERE t.ses_addr = s.saddr
        AND s.sid = m.sid
        AND ROWNUM = 1;

  COUNT(*)
----------
         0
| improve this answer | |
  • There are cases where this method doesn't work, returning false positives: for example if you just select data from a remote database using a database link (select * from remotetable@databaselink) oracle will start a transaction even if you didn't alter any data. This method doesn't guarantee that you have uncommitted data. ... do you know any way to improve this query to filter out transactions of this kind? It really puzzles me. – Carlo Sirna Dec 12 '17 at 10:59
  • @CarloSirna Yes there are cases where Oracle will start a transaction even if you don't alter data. Connecting to a remote database is an example (see for example this thread on Asktom). A simple SELECT ... FOR UPDATE will also start a transaction without modifying data. The method described in my answer tells if you have a transaction pending, not if you have uncommitted data. The two are not equivalent (modifying data is sufficient, but not necessary for starting a transaction). – Vincent Malgrat Dec 13 '17 at 15:41
32

This is the query I normally use,

select s.sid
      ,s.serial#
      ,s.username
      ,s.machine
      ,s.status
      ,s.lockwait
      ,t.used_ublk
      ,t.used_urec
      ,t.start_time
from v$transaction t
inner join v$session s on t.addr = s.taddr;
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    works very well, also I needed to kill the inactive transaction after with ALTER SYSTEM KILL SESSION 'sid,serial#'; – Diizzy May 7 '15 at 13:42
9
SELECT * FROM V$TRANSACTION
WHERE STATUS='ACTIVE';

See: http://forums.oracle.com/forums/thread.jspa?threadID=691061

| improve this answer | |
5

Use the query below to find out pending transaction.

If it returns a value, it means there is a pending transaction.

Here is the query:

select dbms_transaction.step_id from dual;

References:
http://www.acehints.com/2011/07/how-to-check-pending-transaction-in.html http://www.acehints.com/p/site-map.html

| improve this answer | |
  • Do a SET TRANSACTION and then run your query. – Peter Nosko Jan 27 '18 at 18:10
  • @PeterNosko: Your suggested solution works fine, but is pretty convoluted as compared to simple select dbms_transaction.step_id from dual; as suggested by DBA. The step_id returns: NULL if no transaction, 0 if transaction exists but is empty, and non-null,non-zero value if there are any changes pending. IMHO that's much simpler than your version and tells us more about the state of the connection. Did you find any issues with step_id that made it unreliable? – quetzalcoatl Oct 29 '18 at 19:50
4

Also see...

How can I tell if I have uncommitted work in an Oracle transaction?

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    :-) Different descriptions... "uncommitted work" vs "pending transaction" – cagcowboy Aug 19 '09 at 18:33
1

Matthew Watson can be modified to be used in RAC

select t.inst_id 
       ,s.sid
      ,s.serial#
      ,s.username
      ,s.machine
      ,s.status
      ,s.lockwait
      ,t.used_ublk
      ,t.used_urec
      ,t.start_time
from gv$transaction t
inner join gv$session s on t.addr = s.taddr;
| improve this answer | |
1

The easiest and most reliable solution is to try and start a transaction and see it if succeeds. If some code already started a transaction but has not yet issued any DML, then the V$TRANSACTION view won't show anything.

In this example below, I handle the exception to raise a user-defined application error. To defer to an existing exception handler, just do a SET TRANSACTION and then immediately COMMIT to undo it.

DECLARE
    transaction_in_progress EXCEPTION;
    PRAGMA EXCEPTION_INIT(transaction_in_progress, -1453);
BEGIN
    SET TRANSACTION NAME 'CHECK_FOR_TRANSACTION_ALREADY_SET';
    COMMIT; -- end transaction
EXCEPTION
    WHEN transaction_in_progress THEN
        RAISE_APPLICATION_ERROR(-20000,'Transaction is already in progress');
END;
/
| improve this answer | |

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