11

The following client and server UDP broadcast code works on fine when both are on the same PC. However when I have them on separate PC's in the same WIFI LAN nothing happens at all. I have managed to get a multicast version working fine on the two separate PC's but not this :(. I have shut down firewalls on both and succesfully pinged each from both PC's.

The idea behind this test is so I can use this method so a client can find a server on the LAN by sending a datagram packet (peer discovery). I think I'm doing something wrong with the host name or something but after a week of googling and testing new ideas I'm officially all out of them :(.

public class Client
{
    private String hostname= "localhost";
    private int port=1234;
    private InetAddress host;
    private DatagramSocket socket;
    DatagramPacket packet;

    public void run()
    {
        try
        {
            host = InetAddress.getByName(hostname);
            socket = new DatagramSocket (null);
            packet=new DatagramPacket (new byte[100], 0,host, port);
            socket.send (packet);
            packet.setLength(100);
            socket.receive (packet);
            socket.close ();
            byte[] data = packet.getData ();
            String time=new String(data);  // convert byte array data into string
            System.out.println(time);
        }
        catch(Exception e)
        {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}



public class Server
{
    public static final int DEFAULT_PORT = 1234;
    private DatagramSocket socket;
    private DatagramPacket packet;

    public void run()
    {
        try
        {
            socket = new DatagramSocket(DEFAULT_PORT);
        }
        catch( Exception ex )
        {
            System.out.println("Problem creating socket on port: " + DEFAULT_PORT );
        }

        packet = new DatagramPacket (new byte[1], 1);

        while (true)
        {
            try
            {
                socket.receive (packet);
                System.out.println("Received from: " + packet.getAddress () + ":" +
                                   packet.getPort ());
                byte[] outBuffer = new java.util.Date ().toString ().getBytes ();
                packet.setData (outBuffer);
                packet.setLength (outBuffer.length);
                socket.send (packet);
            }
            catch (IOException ie)
            {
                ie.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    }
}

Just wondering if anyone can help?

1
  • Were you able to figure it out? – Phani Rithvij Apr 14 '20 at 16:28
11

To actually broadcast you must send the packet to all the IP on the LAN. The range of possible IP is from 0.0.0.0 to 254.254.254.254 but to select all of them you could write: 255.255.255.255. But most of the routers will block this. They will allow something like 192.168.1.255 witch broadcasts to all the 255 ip from 192.168.1.0 to 192.168.1.254 which is what you need, I think.

1
  • what about 192.168.0.0 to 192.168.0.254 ? Does this works – guru_001 Jun 18 '17 at 18:59
3

Is hostname localhost? If so, you can not reach other pc. You must change it with target IP address.

3
  • 1
    hostname is localhost, which I guessed could have been the problem. I guess a simple solution is to find the IP address of the server and change localhost to that IP address. However doesn't doing this kinda defeat the purpose of UDP broadcast? I was working on the idea that a server listens for any broadcasts on the network. A client sends a broadcast on a network and the server recieves it and replies. I'm using it so the client can discover the server but by manually giving the client the server's IP address the whole discover thing is redundant. – Paul Oct 21 '12 at 16:44
  • I think, firstly you must broadcast to your network. There is a document about this. link – chrome Oct 21 '12 at 16:56
  • 1
    Yeah thats the problem I'm having. I can multicast with no problem. There are lots of UDP broadcast client/server examples but everyone shows localhost for when client and server are on the same machine. No examples for when client and server are not on the same machine :(. Unless the client sends its packet to 192.168.0.0. Tricky... – Paul Oct 22 '12 at 8:51

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