3

I need a very basic example to create a stack chart like this example with a predefined array like this:

var data = [[ 1,  4,  2,  7],
            [21,  2,  5, 10],
            [ 1, 17, 16,  6]]

Whatever I do ends creating errors. E.g. TypeError: data is undefined. Here is my simplified code so far:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<meta charset="utf-8">
<body>
<script src="http://d3js.org/d3.v2.js?2.9.5"></script>
<script>

var margin = {top: 20, right: 30, bottom: 30, left: 40},
    width = 960 - margin.left - margin.right,
    height = 500 - margin.top - margin.bottom;

var data = [[ 1,  4,  2,  7],
            [21,  2,  5, 10],
            [ 1, 17, 16,  6]];

var x = d3.scale.linear()
    .range([0, width])
    .domain([0,3]);

var y = d3.scale.linear()
    .range([height, 0])
    .domain([0,25]);

var z = d3.scale.category20c();

var svg = d3.select("body").append("svg")
    .attr("width", width + margin.left + margin.right)
    .attr("height", height + margin.top + margin.bottom)
    .append("g")
    .attr("transform", "translate(" + margin.left + "," + margin.top + ")");

var stack = d3.layout.stack(data)
      .offset("zero")
      .values(function(d) { return d; })
      .x(function(d, i) { return i; })
      .y(function(d) { return d; });

var area = d3.svg.area()
    .x(function(d, i) { return x(i); })
    .y0(function(d) { return y(d.y0); })
    .y1(function(d) { return y(d.y0 + d.y); });

svg.selectAll(".layer")
      .data(stack)
      .enter().append("path")
      .attr("class", "layer")
      .attr("d", function(d) { return area(d.values); })
      .style("fill", function(d, i) { return colors[i]; });

</script>
5

You can see a working example at http://jsfiddle.net/DyrsK/2/.

Generally I find it easier to permute the input data a little bit to get into the default form that d3 expects. For this example I took your data and computed the x, y and y0 values and then passed that to the default stack layout.

var data = [[ 1,  4,  2,  7],
            [21,  2,  5, 10],
            [ 1, 17, 16,  6]];

// permute the data
data = data.map(function(d) { 
    return d.map(function(p, i) { 
        return {x:i, y:p, y0:0};
    });
});

I think there is an easier way to do this, but I had trouble with the out() function of d3.layout.stack() since your input data was a value but the out() function expects it to be a reference value. This meant that there wasn't a way to update the values with the computed offsets and so the data being returned by stack() was always equal to the input values.

After getting the stack function to work, the rest pretty much followed from the example you linked to:

var stack = d3.layout.stack()
      .offset("zero")

var layers = stack(data);

var area = d3.svg.area()
    .interpolate('cardinal')
    .x(function(d, i) { return x(i); })
    .y0(function(d) { return y(d.y0); })
    .y1(function(d) { return y(d.y0 + d.y); });

svg.selectAll(".layer")
      .data(layers)
      .enter().append("path")
      .attr("class", "layer")
      .attr("d", function(d) { return area(d); })
      .style("fill", function(d, i) { return colors(i); });

Hope this helps!

  • Thanks that helped a lot, my biggest mistake was to use: return area(d.values); which returned an undefined which got me of the track :-( – Fabian Oct 22 '12 at 12:47
  • 2
    I always check what d is referring to by placing a console.log(d) inside the functions like function(d) { console.log(d); return area(d); }). That way I make sure that I'm accessing the right values. – Bill Oct 22 '12 at 16:07
  • It seems that your solution only works well for three columns data. I tried four columns, it displays not as I expect. – chenzhongpu Dec 23 '15 at 3:25
  • Make sure you update the domain of the Y scale to the new sum of the four columns. – Bill Dec 24 '15 at 1:45

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