0
#include<stdio.h>
int main()
{
unsigned short a=-1;
printf("%d",a);
return 0;
}
  1. This is giving me output 65535. why?
  2. When I increased the value of a in negative side the output is (2^16-1=)65535-a.
  3. I know the range of unsigned short int is 0 to 65535. But why is rotating in the range 0 to 65535.What is going inside?

    #include<stdio.h>
    int main()
    {
    unsigned int a=-1;
    printf("%d",a);
    return 0;
    }
    
  4. Output is -1.
  5. %d is used for signed decimal integer than why here it is not following the rule of printing the largest value of its(int) range.
  6. Why the output in this part is -1?
  7. I know %u is used for printing unsigned decimal integer.

    Why the behavioral is undefined in second code and not in first.?

    This I have compiled in gcc compiler. It's a C code On my machine sizeof short int is 2 bytes and size of int is 4 bytes.

3

In your implementation, short is 16 bits and int is 32 bits.

unsigned short a=-1;
printf("%d",a);

First, -1 is converted to unsigned short. This results in the value 65535. For the precise definition see the standard "integer conversions". To summarize: the value is taken modulo USHORT_MAX+1.

This value 65535 is assigned to a.

Then for the printf, which uses varargs, the value is promoted back to int. varargs never pass integer types smaller than int, they're always converted to int. This results in the value 65535, which is printed.

unsigned int a=-1;
printf("%d",a);

First line, same as before but modulo UINT_MAX+1. a is 4294967295.

For the printf, a is passed as an unsigned int. Since %d requires an int the behavior is undefined by the C standard. But your implementation appears to have reinterpreted the unsigned value 4294967295, which has all bits set, as as a signed integer with all-bits-set, i.e. the two's-complement value -1. This behavior is common but not guaranteed.

  • it means that in second case i may get some other value than -1 on some other compiler.The behaviour is undefined?Shouldn,t for the first case also the behaviour is undefined as in that case also printf requires int argument and not unsigned short?Shouldn't the behaviour of both the codes be same whether it is undefined or printing the maximum value. I am unable to understand why it is different. – Tapasweni Pathak Oct 22 '12 at 13:19
  • 1
    @tapasweni: It's different because the standard says that varargs arguments of type unsigned short are promoted to int if int can represent all values of the type. Which on your implementation, it can. So on your implementation, you are providing a vararg of type int as required even though your argument expression has type unsigned short. unsigned int is not promoted to int in varargs, so you are not providing a vararg of type int as required. – Steve Jessop Oct 22 '12 at 13:46
0

Variable assignment is done to the amount of memory of the type of the variable (e.g., short is 2 bytes, int is 4 bytes, in 32 bit hardware, typically). Sign of the variable is not important in the assignment. What matters here is how you are going to access it. When you assign to a 'short' (signed/unsigned) you assign the value to a '2 bytes' memory. Now if you are going to use '%d' in printf, printf will consider it 'integer' (4 bytes in your hardware) and the two MSBs will be 0 and hence you got [0|0](two MSBs) [-1] (two LSBs). Due to the new MSBs (introduced by %d in printf, migration) your sign bit is hidden in the LSBs and hence printf considers it unsigned (due to the MSBs being 0) and you see the positive value. To get a negative in this you need to use '%hd' in first case. In the second case you assigned to '4 bytes' memory and the MSB got its SIGN bit '1' (means negative) during assignment and hence you see the negative number in '%d' of printf. Hope it explains. For more clarification please comment on the answer.

NB: I used 'MSB' for a shorthand of higher-order byte(s). Please read it according to the context (e.g., 'SIGN bit' will make you read like 'Most Significant Bit'). Thanks.

  • This is not the right explanation. If it were true that only the 2 bytes of the short were considered by printf, with the top 2 bytes taken to be 0, then the result of printf("%d", (short)-1) would also be 65535. But it isn't, it's -1. – Steve Jessop Oct 22 '12 at 9:34
  • In this case compiler does the trick. When you use casting, compiler uses 'WORD' operation (using 2 bytes of registers, like movw), and hence the SIGN bit is detected correctly. Without cast it would use 'movl' (for example). For experiments please use 'gcc -S test.c -o test.s' with and without cast. Thanks. – Ayub Oct 22 '12 at 9:40
  • Sorry, but in C, experiments cannot prove correctness. They can prove incorrectness sometimes. Those are two very different things. – Alexey Frunze Oct 22 '12 at 9:46
  • Ok, my answer explains his case. I am not saying the answer in general. Thanks. – Ayub Oct 22 '12 at 9:47

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.