137

I want to call some method on every 5 minutes. How can I do this?

public class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("*** calling MyMethod *** ");
        Console.ReadLine();
    }

    private MyMethod()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("*** Method is executed at {0} ***", DateTime.Now);
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}
2

11 Answers 11

216
var startTimeSpan = TimeSpan.Zero;
var periodTimeSpan = TimeSpan.FromMinutes(5);

var timer = new System.Threading.Timer((e) =>
{
    MyMethod();   
}, null, startTimeSpan, periodTimeSpan);

Edit - this answer is out of date. See https://stackoverflow.com/a/70887955/426894

15
  • 28
    Another way to set the interval is by passing in a timespan object. I think it's a little bit cleaner: Timespan.FromMinutes(5) Oct 22, 2012 at 20:41
  • 2
    @MichaelHaren I didn't know that, that is very nice. Thank you!
    – asawyer
    Oct 22, 2012 at 20:42
  • 4
    @asawyer Unfortunately your implementation gives a compile error. TotalMilliseconds returns a double while the timer expects integers or TimeSpan. I tried to update your answer to one that employs TimeSpan and throws out unnecessary bloat; however, you reverted it. Feb 5, 2014 at 23:09
  • 2
    @AndréChristofferAndersen Change 0 in Time constructor to TimeSpan.Zero. Code works after this.
    – RredCat
    Dec 1, 2015 at 14:07
  • 2
    Code gives an error. This is the fix new System.Threading.Timer((e) => { Func(); }, null, TimeSpan.Zero, TimeSpan.FromMinutes(1).TotalMilliseconds);
    – Asheh
    Mar 11, 2016 at 12:22
61

I based this on @asawyer's answer. He doesn't seem to get a compile error, but some of us do. Here is a version which the C# compiler in Visual Studio 2010 will accept.

var timer = new System.Threading.Timer(
    e => MyMethod(),  
    null, 
    TimeSpan.Zero, 
    TimeSpan.FromMinutes(5));
5
  • 12
    Commenting for posterity. It would stop when you called Dispose() method on the timer object. Example: timer.Dispose() using the code above as a reference. This will destroy the timer, however and prevent you from using it again. timer.Change(Timeout.Infinite, Timeout.Infinite) would be better if you want to use the timer again in the same program. Oct 17, 2016 at 14:11
  • 1
    But why does MyMethod() not run when I run it in console application
    – Izuagbala
    Jul 27, 2018 at 7:35
  • @Izuagbala It's hard to say why it doesn't work for you without knowing the particulars of how you have set it up. This solution was tested in a console application. Jul 27, 2018 at 18:03
  • What is the null? May 25, 2019 at 16:57
  • @DanielReyhanian You can add an object state instead of the null, that is as a argument when calling the callback function (i.e., the first argument). May 26, 2019 at 17:10
21

Update .NET 6

For most use cases in dotnet 6+, you should use the PeriodicTimer:

var timer = new PeriodicTimer(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(10));

while (await timer.WaitForNextTickAsync())
{
    //Business logic
}

This has several advantages, including async / await support, avoiding memory leaks from callbacks, and CancelationToken support

Further Reading

0
12

Start a timer in the constructor of your class. The interval is in milliseconds so 5*60 seconds = 300 seconds = 300000 milliseconds.

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    System.Timers.Timer timer = new System.Timers.Timer();
    timer.Interval = 300000;
    timer.Elapsed += timer_Elapsed;
    timer.Start();
}

Then call GetData() in the timer_Elapsed event like this:

static void timer_Elapsed(object sender, System.Timers.ElapsedEventArgs e)
{
    //YourCode
}
5

Example of using a Timer:

using System;
using System.Timers;

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    Timer t = new Timer(TimeSpan.FromMinutes(5).TotalMilliseconds); // Set the time (5 mins in this case)
    t.AutoReset = true;
    t.Elapsed += new System.Timers.ElapsedEventHandler(your_method);
    t.Start();
}

// This method is called every 5 mins
private static void your_method(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
{
    Console.WriteLine("..."); 
}
0
4

I've uploaded a Nuget Package that can make it so simple, you can have it from here ActionScheduler

It supports .NET Standard 2.0

And here how to start using it

using ActionScheduler;

var jobScheduler = new JobScheduler(TimeSpan.FromMinutes(8), new Action(() => {
  //What you want to execute
}));

jobScheduler.Start(); // To Start up the Scheduler

jobScheduler.Stop(); // To Stop Scheduler from Running.
1
  • Could not install package 'CrystalJobScheduler 1.0.0'. You are trying to install this package into a project that targets '.NETFramework,Version=v4.5', but the package does not contain any assembly references or content files that are compatible with that framework. For more information, contact the package author. Mar 31, 2019 at 17:20
3

Use a Timer. Timer documentation.

2

Using a DispatcherTimer:

 var _activeTimer = new DispatcherTimer {
   Interval = TimeSpan.FromMinutes(5)
 };
 _activeTimer.Tick += delegate (object sender, EventArgs e) { 
   YourMethod(); 
 };
 _activeTimer.Start();          
2
  • Just want to point out that if you want to do it every x seconds, then you can do, TimeSpan.FromSeconds(x) Apr 11 at 20:59
  • 1
    Yeah, but the OP needed it in minutes. :) Apr 12 at 19:57
0

If you need more complicated time executions such as linux cron, you can use NCrontab.

I use NCrontab in production for long time and it works perfect!

Nuget

How to use:

* * * * *
- - - - -
| | | | |
| | | | +----- day of week (0 - 6) (Sunday=0)
| | | +------- month (1 - 12)
| | +--------- day of month (1 - 31)
| +----------- hour (0 - 23)
+------------- min (0 - 59)
using NCrontab;
//...

protected override async Task ExecuteAsync(CancellationToken stoppingToken)
{
  // run every 5 minutes
  var schedule = CrontabSchedule.Parse("*/5 * * * *");
  var nextRun = schedule.GetNextOccurrence(DateTime.Now);
  logger.LogInformation("Worker running at: {time}", DateTimeOffset.Now);    
  do
  {
    if (DateTime.Now > nextRun)
    {
      logger.LogInformation("Sending notifications at: {time}", DateTimeOffset.Now);
      await DoSomethingAsync();
      nextRun = schedule.GetNextOccurrence(DateTime.Now);
    }
    await Task.Delay(1000, stoppingToken);
  } while (!stoppingToken.IsCancellationRequested);
}

Add seconds if you need:

// run every 10 secs
var schedule = CrontabSchedule.Parse("0/10 * * * * *", new CrontabSchedule.ParseOptions { IncludingSeconds = true });
0

It can be achieved by applying while loop and calling Thread.Sleep at the end of the loop.

while (true)
{
    //Your code
    Thread.Sleep(5000);
}

Make sure to include using System.Threading.

-1
while (true)
{
    Thread.Sleep(60 * 5 * 1000);
    Console.WriteLine("*** calling MyMethod *** ");
    MyMethod();
}
3
  • 1
    yup if anything use await Task.Delay(60 * 5 * 1000);
    – CMS
    Apr 20, 2018 at 18:17
  • I like this answer, much simpler than any Timer above.
    – Denny
    Jan 28, 2021 at 8:49
  • I think sleep makes the whole app freeze! Nov 17, 2021 at 8:11

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