0
try {
  Man Fred = new Man();
} catch (exception e) {
  Print e 
}

Print Fred.getName ();

Fred is now out of scope. How should I be doing this?

5
  • 3
    I don't really see how this is valid Java syntax... ;)
    – brimborium
    Oct 23 '12 at 7:29
  • @brimborium Looks like pseudo code :P Oct 23 '12 at 7:34
  • @LewsTherin Not really, more like a mix of pseudo code and Java...
    – brimborium
    Oct 23 '12 at 7:37
  • Yep, does that make it an hybrid? Oct 23 '12 at 7:41
  • 1
    @LewsTherin No, that makes it ugly code with syntax error.
    – brimborium
    Oct 23 '12 at 8:10
4

And now in proper Java:

Man fred = null;
try {
  fred = new Man();
} catch (Exception e) {
  e.printStackTrace(); 
}

if (fred != null) {
  System.out.println(fred.getName());
}

You'll have to declare the variable inside the code block where you want to access it. In this special case: outside the "try" block.

1
  • Finally. :D Just waited for that one. :P
    – brimborium
    Oct 23 '12 at 7:31
4

You seem aware of Java syntax so in pseudo

 Man Fred = null;
    try {
      Fred = new Man();
    } catch (exception e) {
      print e 
    } finally {
       //You could do some clean up.
    }

    if(Fred != null) {
      print Fred.getName();
    }

If not..

   Man fred = null;
   try {
      fred = new Man();
    } catch (Exception e) {
      System.out.println(e.printStackTrace());
    } finally {
       //You could do some clean up.
    }

    if(fred != null) {
      System.out.println(fred.getName());
    }

The Fred variable has to be declared outside the try block. So it is visible in method or outer scope.

4
  • @LewsTherin Nope, Duncan only edited the question, but is not OP... ;)
    – brimborium
    Oct 23 '12 at 7:34
  • @brimborium Yeah my bad. I just woke up :) Oct 23 '12 at 7:35
  • Oh and you shouldn't delete comments unless neccessary. It will make discussions in the comments irritating to others (as will happen here :D). Good morning btw!
    – brimborium
    Oct 23 '12 at 7:35
  • @brimborium I actually deleted it before I saw your comment. But point taken ;) And thanks! Oct 23 '12 at 7:36
1

Fred is only available inside the try-block, since that's where you declared him. Instead, declare him outside the block, like so:

Man fred;
try {
    fred = new Man();
} catch (Exception e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
}

if (fred != null) {
    System.out.println(fred);
}

Note the extra if (fred != null); since creating fred might've thrown an Exception, in which case fred will be null, and printing him might not work.

2
  • So why move the declaration outside the try-block, when you could move the use(s) inside and avoid the test and the initialization to null?
    – user207421
    Oct 23 '12 at 9:33
  • That'd be a solution too. In a situation where you could live without fred and do some other things, you'll use the above solution. On the other hand, if you're sure you don't want to continue without fred, you'll want @EJP's solution.
    – mthmulders
    Oct 23 '12 at 9:37
0

The correct way is as follows:

try
{   
    Man fred = new Man(); 
    print(fred.getName()); 
} 
catch (Exception exc) 
{   
    exc.printStackTrace();
}  

In other words your 'try' block should be large enough to encompass all the subsequent uses of fred. Resist the temptation to make them tiny and sequential. Instead make them large and nested.

-1

See following changes:

Man Fred = null; 
Try
{   
    Fred = new Man(); 
} 
catch (exception e) 
{   
    Print e  
}  

If(Fred != null)
{
    Print Fred.getName (); 
}
2
  • If? With a capital I? Print? Without parenthesis? If the code is tagged with Java the answer should at least be Java code...
    – Matteo
    Oct 23 '12 at 7:35
  • @Matteo: it was just a pseudocode with Java programming flow not the syntax.
    – Azodious
    Oct 23 '12 at 7:39

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