54

For example, I have a string, consists of "sample.zip". How do I remove the ".zip" extension using strings package or other else?

60

Edit: Go has moved on. Please see Keith's answer.

Use path/filepath.Ext to get the extension. You can then use the length of the extension to retrieve the substring minus the extension.

var filename = "hello.blah"
var extension = filepath.Ext(filename)
var name = filename[0:len(filename)-len(extension)]

Alternatively you could use strings.LastIndex to find the last period (.) but this may be a little more fragile in that there will be edge cases (e.g. no extension) that filepath.Ext handles that you may need to code for explicitly, or if Go were to be run on a theoretical O/S that uses a extension delimiter other than the period.

  • strings.TrimSuffix, underneath, does the same array math/indices :) – rogerdpack May 29 '14 at 6:58
  • 2
    @rogerdpack, yes people should use Keith's answer. TrimSuffix didn't exist in Go when I wrote this answer (it was added in Go 1.1 in February 2013). – Paul Ruane Oct 15 '14 at 10:06
  • filepath.Ext(filename) did not work for me, I needed to use path.Ext(filename) instead. Thanks tho. – Derk Jan Speelman Apr 2 at 13:04
181

Try:

basename := "hello.blah"
name := strings.TrimSuffix(basename, filepath.Ext(basename))

TrimSuffix basically tells it to strip off the trailing string which is the extension with a dot.

TrimSuffix docu here

  • 6
    Note that filepath.Ext("test.tar.gz") returns .gz which may or may not be what you want. – Charles L. Oct 4 '16 at 18:30
1

This way works too:

var filename = "hello.blah"
var extension = filepath.Ext(filename)
var name = TrimRight(filename, extension)

but maybe Paul Ruane's method is more efficient?

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