5

More of a curiosity question than anything else, but is it actually possible to pass whatever goes through std::cin to a function as a parameter without defining an temporary variable just for reading from input?

Instead of using an extra temporary variable:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

string time; // extra define temporary variable for input 
// now 2 lines follow with separate operations
cin >> time; // 1) input to "time"
in_time = get_minutes (time); // 2) put "time" to function as parameter
cin >> time;  // another extra line
wake_up = get_minutes (time);
cin >> time;  // and another other extra line ....
opens = get_minutes (time);

I want to directly use std::cin in a function parameter:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

in_time = get_minutes (<use of cin here>);
wake_up = get_minutes (<use of cin here>);
opens = get_minutes (<use of cin here>);

Is this possible?

5
  • pass to where? waste a variable ?? Oct 23, 2012 at 10:46
  • 1
    You shouldnt worry about such things, as a good compiler should know when it can eliminate such variables.
    – Alex
    Oct 23, 2012 at 10:51
  • 1
    Maybe better to pass cin itself to the function. But in general no, there is no way to use cin without variables since the compiler needs to know the type of the object you are trying to read, and it gets that from the type of the variable.
    – john
    Oct 23, 2012 at 10:55
  • @john: "compiler needs to know the type of the object you are trying to read, and it gets that from the type of the variable" - except for cin.get() which always reads a character, and some less often useful functions like peek(). Oct 23, 2012 at 11:52
  • @user1749737: Syntactically a template T read<T>(cin) will do the job, but it will be very dangerous, think of f(read<int>(cin),read<string>(cin)); what comes first?
    – Arpegius
    Oct 23, 2012 at 12:12

4 Answers 4

9

You can easily define a wrapper function to do this.

template<class T>
T get(std::istream& is){
  T result;
  is >> result;
  return result;
}

Any decent compiler will use NRVO to eliminate the copy.

You can use it like this

f(get<int>(std::cin));

Make sure not to use it multiple times in one statement though. The order of the stream operations is unspecified if you do something like this.

f(get<int>(std::cin),get<int>(std::cin));

You could get the two ints in either order.

2

cin is just a stream, it doesn't have any magic. You can use the other stream methods to do whatever you want.

Check out http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/iostream/

0

The answer to your question is negative. In order to input something through a stream, you will have to "waste" a variable. You cannot pass the input data directly to a function without an intermediate variable.

1
  • "You cannot pass the input data directly to a function without an intermediate variable." - you can in trivial cases - f(cin.get());. The streaming operators that give iostreams their character definitely do require a variable. Oct 23, 2012 at 11:49
0

Sure:

f(*std::istream_iterator<T>(std::cin));

That’s probably not simpler than using a variable, though, and is undefined behavior if the stream fails to provide a T.

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