76

I'm in a tutorial which introduces files (how to read and write from\to file)

First of all, this is not a homework, this is just general help I'm seeking.

I know how to read one word at a time, but I don't know how to read one line at a time or how to read the whole text file.

What if my file contains 1000 words? It is not practical to read each word.

My text file named (Read) contains the following:

I love to play games I love reading I have 2 books

This is what I have accomplished so far:

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>

using namespace std;
int main (){

  ifstream inFile;
  inFile.open("Read.txt");

  inFile >>

Is there any possible way to read the whole file at once, instead of reading each line or each word separate?

  • 4
    There are well-defined answers here: stackoverflow.com/questions/551082/c-read-lines-from-file – sampson-chen Oct 23 '12 at 17:09
  • possible duplicate of How to read a line from a text file in c/c++? – Adrian McCarthy Oct 23 '12 at 18:20
  • Reading word by word is only marginally slower than line by line. If you actually need words, then it's better to read words. Read lines if you're dealing with line-oriented data such as CSV file. – Arkadiy Oct 23 '12 at 18:27
  • @Arkadiy that is incorrect. For an 100 MiB file, reading line by line will easily take seconds, while reading a block of 4 KiB at a time seconds less than a second. – Vallentin Jul 31 '16 at 8:46
  • @Vallentin: Given that the streams are all buffered, the actual disk reading is done block by block already. The rest is just manipulating data in memory. – Arkadiy Aug 1 '16 at 13:00
144

You can use std::getline :

#include <fstream>
#include <string>

int main() 
{ 
    std::ifstream file("Read.txt");
    std::string str; 
    while (std::getline(file, str))
    {
        // Process str
    }
}

Also note that it's better you just construct the file stream with the file names in it's constructor rather than explicitly opening (same goes for closing, just let the destructor do the work).

Further documentation about std::string::getline() can be read at CPP Reference.

Probably the easiest way to read a whole text file is just to concatenate those retrieved lines.

std::ifstream file("Read.txt");
std::string str;
std::string file_contents;
while (std::getline(file, str))
{
  file_contents += str;
  file_contents.push_back('\n');
}  
  • 8
    Although not obvious, while(getline(f, line)) { ...} really is the recommended way to do this. This is explained here: gehrcke.de/2011/06/… --- there you also find useful approaches for proper error handling. – Jan-Philip Gehrcke Jan 18 '15 at 14:19
  • 1
    The above code will not compile without #include <iostream> – Tyguy7 Aug 16 '15 at 22:28
  • @Tyguy7 Why would #include <iostream> be required? It seems to me that <fstream> and <string> are enough. If you mean std::getline, it is in <string>, not in <iostream>. – Fabio Turati Mar 8 '17 at 23:53
  • @FabioTurati I'm not sure, I just know that once I included it, everything compiled fine. – Tyguy7 May 16 '17 at 0:28
19

I know this is a really really old thread but I'd like to also point out another way which is actually really simple... This is some sample code:

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

int main() {

    ifstream file("filename.txt");
    string content;

    while(file >> content) {
        cout << content << ' ';
    }
    return 0;
}
  • 2
    Nice answer, I used this with a stringstream instead of cout to get the whole file into a giant stringstream – bjackfly Feb 6 '14 at 19:24
4

I think you could use istream .read() function. You can just loop with reasonable chunk size and read directly to memory buffer, then append it to some sort of arbitrary memory container (such as std::vector). I could write an example, but I doubt you want a complete solution; please let me know if you shall need any additional information.

  • I dont know who downvoted this answer but this is good may be i am not of your standards but I use the same thing – Javasist Oct 25 '12 at 9:16
4

Well, to do this one can also use the freopen function provided in C++ - http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/cstdio/freopen/ and read the file line by line as follows -:

#include<cstdio>
#include<iostream>

using namespace std;

int main(){
   freopen("path to file", "rb", stdin);
   string line;
   while(getline(cin, line))
       cout << line << endl;
   return 0;
}
1

Another method that has not been mentioned yet is std::vector.

std::vector<std::string> line;

while(file >> mystr)
{
   line.push_back(mystr);
}

Then you can simply iterate over the vector and modify/extract what you need/

  • 3
    The vector is an unnecessary step. You could iterate over the ifstream using std::istream_iterator<std::string>(inFile). – Joseph Mansfield Oct 23 '12 at 18:12

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