27

EDIT: Sorry my question was not clear, why do books/articles prefer implementation#1 over implementation#2?

What is the actual advantage of using pointer in implementation of Singleton class vs using a static object? Why do most books prefer this

class Singleton
{
  private:

    static Singleton *p_inst;
    Singleton();

  public:

    static Singleton * instance()
    {
      if (!p_inst)
      {
        p_inst = new Singleton();
      }

      return p_inst;
    }
};

over this

class Singleton
{
  public:
    static Singleton& Instance()
    {
        static Singleton inst;
        return inst;
    }

  protected:
    Singleton(); // Prevent construction
    Singleton(const Singleton&); // Prevent construction by copying
    Singleton& operator=(const Singleton&); // Prevent assignment
    ~Singleton(); // Prevent unwanted destruction
};
14
  • 1
    The second one is inherently thread-safe, and also won't report memory leaks if a memory-leak checker is used. Oct 24, 2012 at 10:41
  • 1
    @JoachimPileborg - only guaranteed threadsafe in fully conformant C++11, AFAIK.
    – Roddy
    Oct 24, 2012 at 10:43
  • 1
    @Nawaz: It gets created exactly once, in one of those threads, and is only returned after it has been created.
    – Mankarse
    Oct 24, 2012 at 10:45
  • 1
    @Anon - which books - Can you give an example?
    – Roddy
    Oct 24, 2012 at 10:48
  • 2
    @Anon: That book was written almost twenty years ago. Both the language, and our understanding of how to use it effectively, have changed considerably since then. Oct 24, 2012 at 10:53

7 Answers 7

19

why do books/articles prefer implementation#1 over implementation#2?

Because most articles describing the Singleton anti-pattern don't fully understand all the hidden dangers when trying to implement it safely in C++. It's surprisingly difficult to get it right.

What is the actual advantage of using pointer in implementation of Singleton class vs using a static object?

Using a pointer, with new but no delete, ensures that the object will never be destroyed, so there is no danger of accessing it after its lifetime has ended. Combined with the "lazy" creation, the first time that it's accessed, this guarantees that all accesses are to a valid object. The disadvantages are that creation is not thread-safe, and that the object and any resources it acquires are not released at the end of the program.

Using a local static object, creation is thread-safe on any compiler that supports the C++11 threading model; also, the object will be destroyed at the end of the program. However, it is possible to access the object after its destruction (e.g. from the destructor of another static object), which could lead to nasty bugs.

The best option is to avoid static data, and globally-accessible data, as much as possible. In particular, never use the Singleton anti-pattern; it combines global, static data with weird instantiation restrictions that make testing unnecessarily difficult.

3
  • Accepting this answer because it explains the difference and why. But upvotes to everyone. Thanks
    – Anon
    Oct 24, 2012 at 11:06
  • 2
    +1 for calling Singleton and anti-pattern. I don't necessarily agree with "never use" but certainly "rarely use".
    – CashCow
    Oct 24, 2012 at 11:26
  • "...ensures that the object will never be destroyed" I just read the gof singleton chapter and was a bit surprised that they dont mention at all the destruction of the singleton. Is it because it really doesnt matter or did they simply forget to discuss it? Jul 13, 2017 at 15:50
9

The second version (using a local static variable) has significant advantages.

It does not require use of the free-store, and so will not be detected as a memory leak. It is thread-safe (in C++11). It is shorter and simpler.

The only downsides are that it is impossible to make it portably threadsafe (for pre-C++11 compilers), and that it does not give you the option of explicitly destroying the singleton instance.

3
  • Yes, that is the question, why do books prefer the first one over the second one? Does the first one have any advantage that the second implementation does not?
    – Anon
    Oct 24, 2012 at 10:46
  • But the disadvantage is non-deterministic destruction, so if you have many of these you cannot select the order in which they are destroyed.
    – CashCow
    Oct 24, 2012 at 10:57
  • @CashCow: Indeed. However, I weep for the program in which that is important.
    – Mankarse
    Oct 24, 2012 at 10:59
4

I'd always prefer the second, but the first does have a couple of potentially interesting advantages:-

  • Clarity - the checking of the pointer being null is effectively what the compiler does under the hood when constructing static objects. From a 'learning' perspective, it's instructive to understand what's happening when you use static objects in method scope.

  • Lazy Allocation - in the first case, the Singleton object is heap-allocated. If your function never runs, the object is never constructed and never consumes memory. But, in the second case, memory is assigned by the linker to hold the object before the program starts, even though 'construction' is lazy.

2
  • In the second case memory is not allocated for locally declared static objects (assuming Instance() is not called) as opposed to static member variable. It can be verified by adding a print statement in the constructor.
    – Sandeep
    May 11, 2015 at 9:35
  • 2
    @sandeep. You're confusing construction with allocation. The object will typically be statically allocated by the linker, so is consuming memory even though it hasn't been constructed yet.
    – Roddy
    May 11, 2015 at 10:04
3

The second one has non-deterministic destruction. The first one, you are in control as to when you delete the pointer, if at all.

The first construct is not thread-safe, of course, but can be made so with boost::call_once (or std::call_once if available)

The second construct was common enough that many compilers made it thread-safe even if technically by the standard it isn't (although by the standard the object should only be created once, I'm not sure about the standard's view on completion of the construction before another thread uses it).

If there is no issue with the order of destruction then you can go ahead and use the static version, as long as your compiler guarantees it as thread-safe.

3
  • 1
    The initialisation of local statics is thread safe in all versions of the language that have threads. (But the point stands that it is not threadsafe in many pre-C++11 compilers).
    – Mankarse
    Oct 24, 2012 at 10:44
  • C++11 has std::call_once and std::once_flag.
    – Nawaz
    Oct 24, 2012 at 10:46
  • static version is thread-safe with most compilers, it wasn't always. C++11 standard is that compilers must make it thread-safe. Previous standard never said anything about threads.
    – CashCow
    Oct 24, 2012 at 10:55
3

The second example is known by the name "Meyers' Singleton", because it was published first in either "Effective C++", or "More Effective C++". I'm not sure which one, but both were published after "Design Patterns" - so the Gang of Four might just as well have been unaware of the second pattern when their book was written.

Also, the first approach is much more standard for other languages - you can do the first one in Java or C#, but not the second, so people coming from different backgrounds could be another reason for the first one to be more famous.

On the technical side, with the first approach you can control when the singleton is destroyed, but this could also bring you a lot of headaches.

1

One advantage is that you do not have to check whether the singleton has already been instantiated.

Another is that you do not have to worry about de-allocating any memory.

-3

How about a non-local static? Anyone see a problem with this?

class Singleton
{
    static Singleton singleton;
    Singleton();
    // etc

public:
    static Singleton &Instance() { return singleton; }
};

Singleton Singleton::singleton;

// etc
1
  • Um, yes...there is a fundamental problem with this. For instance, where would you define the instance? How would you ensure it was instantiated before any other translation unit tried to access it? Trick questions: The problems resulting from using global statics are precisely why a function-local instance is used (in either way illustrated by the OP) as a 'guard'. Just go read about the well-known "static initialisation order fiasco" Dec 26, 2015 at 15:51

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